Student Disability Services
209 Alumni Hall
Phone: 607.436.2137
Fax: 607.436.3167
sds@oneonta.edu

Office Hours
Mon - Fri: 8am - 4:30pm

 

Frequently Asked Questions

FAQ
What is SDS?
What does SDS offer?
What type of adaptive technology does SDS provide?
Where is SDS located?
Who works for SDS?
What do I do when I come to campus in the fall?
What kind of issues can I present to SDS, how do I know if they can help me or not?
What if I have a problem with receiving my accommodations?
What if I have a problem with SDS?
What about confidentiality?
Will SDS really help?
Maybe I'll try it on my own, just for one semester!!!
Do I only sign up for SDS once?
How can I find out the accessibility of buildings on campus?
What do I do if I am a returning student?
What do I do if I am a new student and need more information about your services?
What is the ADA?
Who does the ADA protect?
Is there anyone I can call for general questions about the ADA?
What is a physical or mental impairment?

What is SDS? SDS is where students who are diagnosed with a disability can go to receive assistance in receiving an equitable opportunity at Oneonta.

We work with students to develop a comprehensive accommodation plan to assist in all areas of the college experience.

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What does SDS offer?

Testing Assistance Classroom Assistance Other Assistance
Extended Time Note takers Academic Advisement
Distraction Free Tutors Personal Advisement
Scribing Enlarged Overheads Elevator Keys
Oral Testing Early Handouts Transportation

This is only a partial list of some of the accommodations you may be eligible for. Each plan is individualized for specific need. If your needs are not listed, not to worry, we work closely with each student to ensure that all needs are being met.

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What type of adaptive technology does SDS provide?

At this time, SDS offers the following assistive technology equipment and software:

VTEK Image Enhancer Zoom Text Dragon Naturally Speaking
FM Systems Tape Recorders Computers
Calculators TDD

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Where is SDS located?

Currently SDS is housed in Alumni Hall (the same building admissions is in) in room 101-F. We will be moving hopefully before the fall '99 semester. Our new offices will be in 209 Alumni Hall. There is an elevator in the basement of Alumni Hall for those who may need it.

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What do I do when I come to campus in the fall?

You should meet with Craig the first week of classes (or earlier if you live locally). At this first meeting, the two of you will meet to set up your accommodation plan, go over the policies of the office, and meet the staff.

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What kind of issues can I present to SDS, how do I know if they can help me or not?

SDS encourages you to come to us with any concerns about any part of your college life. If we can't help you, we know someone who can. So if you're questioning "this may not be a disability related issue", don't worry about it, it doesn't have to be. We know how difficult being in a new situation can be and we want to make this transition as easy as possible.

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What if I have a problem with receiving my accommodations?

Fortunately, this happens very infrequently at Oneonta. The faculty and staff here are very accommodating professionals. However, if a problem should arise, you should meet with Craig immediately. Usually any problems can be resolved quickly and with all parties being satisfied.

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What if I have a problem with SDS?

Again, meet with Craig immediately. We can't resolve a problem we don't know about, and want to hear what we are doing wrong so we can make it right. If your problem does not get resolved with Craig, you should follow the grievance procedure which will be provided to you in the fall.

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What about confidentiality?

SDS makes every effort to keep all records and information completely confidential. The student signs a consent for release of information form at the beginning of each academic year to instruct SDS staff on who we can and cannot provide information to. This includes parents.

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Will SDS really help?

If we didn't, we wouldn't be here. Nation-wide statistics show that students with disabilities receive a comparable GPA to students without disabilities, WHEN they use the services that an office such as SDS offers. That same research shows that students who do not use such services get a much lower GPA, and have a much higher drop out rate.

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Maybe I'll try it on my own, just for one semester!!!

We here this statement all the time, and admit it is admirable to work independently; however, the first semester at a new college is not the time to try it. The workload is much heavier and much different than high school, and may differ dramatically from any previous colleges attended. It makes much more sense to at least register with the office and see what we have to offer. This way, if you need us we will already have a file set up for you.

We work with all students toward consistently becoming more independent. The skills you can develop while utilizing the services SDS offers will you give you a greater opportunity at higher success.

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Do I only sign up for SDS once?

We ask that all students update their accommodation plans each semester. This keeps records current and allows for any changes to be made.

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How can I find out the accessibility of buildings on campus?
Click here This link will take you to a list of the buildings and their accessibilities.

What do I do if I am a returning student?
Please check out this link to get information for returning students.

What do I do if I am a new student and need more information about your services?
Please check out this link to find out more information about being a new student with this office.

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What is the ADA?
The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a Federal civil rights law. It gives Federal civil rights protections to individuals with disabilities similar to those provided to individuals on the basis of race, color, sex, national origin, age, and religion. It guarantees equal opportunity for individuals with disabilities in State and local government services, public accommodations, employment, transportation, and telecommunications.

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Who does the ADA protect?
The ADA covers a wide range of individuals with disabilities. An individual is considered to have a "disability" if he or she has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, has a record of such an impairment, or is regarded as having such an impairment. Major life activities include such things as caring for one's self, performing manual tasks, walking, seeing, hearing, speaking, breathing, learning, and working. To be substantially limited means that such activities are restricted in the manner, condition, or duration in which they are performed in comparison with most people. The ADA also protects people who are discriminated against because of their association with a person with a disability.

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Is there anyone I can call for general questions about the ADA?
Call to obtain answers to general and technical questions about the ADA and to order technical assistance materials: 1-800-514-0301 (voice) 1-800-514-0383 (TDD) http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/ada/adahom1.htm

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What is a physical or mental impairment?
Physical-any physiological disorder, or condition, cosmetic disfigurement, or anatomical loss affecting one or more of the following body systems: neurological, musculoskeletal, special sense organs, respiratory (including speech organs), cardiovascular, reproductive, digestive, genito-urinary, hemic and lymphatic, skin, and endocrine Mental-any mental or psychological disorder, such as mental retardation, organic brain syndrome, emotional or mental illness, and specific learning disabilities. A learning disability may make it difficult for a person to receive information from his or her senses, process it, and communicate what s/he knows. The learning disability frequently causes severe difficulty in reading, writing, or mathematics.

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