Courses - Spring 2016

 

WMST 130 - GENDER, POWER & DIFFERENCE
Introduces methods and approaches of women's and genderĀ· studies from a variety of feminist perspectives. Surveys what is happening to women and men in the modern world; reviews various feminist theories, the social construction of gender, and the intersections of different social and cultural markers such as race, class and sexuality in the construction. The course also examines social movements, and issues of critical importance within the discipline - including popular culture, pornography, the family, representation and reproductive rights vs. birth control -that impact women's lives and their experiences. (LA, WS2)
  MWF
MWF
MWF
TTh
1:00-1:50
3:00-3:50
10:00-10:50
10:00-11:15
Bambi Lobdell
Bambi Lobdell
Jorge Estrada
Kathy Ashe
 
 
WMST/PHED 150 - SELF DEFENSE FOR WOMEN
Students will be informed of the numerous ways they or members of their family may be criminally threatened. Students will learn a variety of physical and non-physical techniques that can be used to avoid or respond to such situations. Judo and Karate techniques of throwing and striking an attacker and dealing with physical force will be taught.
  TTh
TTh
8:30-9:45
10:00-11:15
Diana Nicols
Diana Nicols
 
 
WMST 214- WITCHES, HARLOTS, WILD WOMEN
This class study cultural stories - various literatures, religious writings, medical arguments, laws, feminist essays, song lyrics, and others - of the past 3500 years focusing on various forms of the Archetypal Wild Women, including goddesses, teachers, wise women, healers, witches, warriors, whores, saints, mothers, green women and mad women. Readings will include biblical texts, mythologies of goddess from various cultures, the Malleus Maleficarum, and critical writings on contemporary female sexuality to trace the reoccurring pattern of containment of female sexuality that attempts to produce a sense of order and stability created only by severely restricting women. We will explore the potential results of women refusing boundaries and containment as we examine the cultural stories that define, patrol, and discipline the socially constructed functions, roles, and definitions of women. (LA, BC3) Prerequisites: SoS and 3 s.h. Humanities
  MWF 11:00 - 11:50 Jorge Estrada  
 
WMST/POLS 215- GENDER POLITICS
Examines how politics and government affect women and women's interests, as well as how women affect government and politics. Topics includepolitical culture and definitions of female roles; views of women in political theory; female political participation and protest movements; women and the law; and public policy and women. Offered every third or fourth semester. (LA) Prerequisites: SoS or 3 s.h. POLS
  MWF 10:00-10:50 Janet Day  
 
WMST/SOCL 235- THEORIES IN FAMILY STUDIES
This course covers the major theoretical frameworks and empirical works in family sociology. Changing structures and ideologies of family are covered form pre-industrial to contemporary times. Related issues of childhood, parenting, sexuality, gender relations, divorce and relationships, paid and unpaid labor, and work-family balance are covered. Impact of economy, polity and major institutions emphasized. Offered irregularly, (LA) Prerequisite: 3 s.h. SOCL
  MWF 1:00-1:50 Elizabeth Seale  
 
SOCL 236 - SOCIOLOGY OF SEXUALITY
In this course, we will look at sexual desire, behavior, romance, and identity from a sociological, perspective. We are not interested in acts but in the social, cultural, and political significance attached to the acts. Topics will include hierarchies of behavior; how different ethnic, cultural, and religious groups conceptualize sexual identity the history of heterosexual, gay/lesbian, and other sexual subcultures; the commercialization of sexual practices; and how globalization is affecting contemporary sexual behaviors. We will pay special attention to criminalized or stigmatized behaviors, such ~s sexual assault, fetishes, and prostitution. Prerequisite: SOCL 100 or SOCL 110
  TTH 10:00-11:15 Elizabeth Seale  
 
WMST/COMM 241 - GENDER COMMUNICATION
This elective for graduate 01~ undergraduate students explores the sexual biases which affect male/female communication in the rhetorical discourse of the every- day and literary market place. The distinct verbal and non-verbal vocabularies of men and women affect the way people interact in education, politics, marriage and family, business, and broadcasting. The modern attitudinal remnants of one historical pattern for male-female role playing-- the courtly love tradition--will be explored. The course will consider empirical studies which prove or disprove these and other traditional myths about male/female communication. Consideration will be given to the way that sex affects credibility or status in discussion, debate, mass media portraits, and other realms of both public and private discourse. (LA) Prerequisite: SoS or 3 s.h. COMM
  MWF 1:00-2:15 Kristen Blinne  
 
WMST/PSYC 243 - PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN
A feminist perspective is used to explore the influence of social and psychological factors in shaping women's attitudes and behavior and in shaping the attitudes and behavior of people toward women. The role played by psychology in creating scientific myths about women and, more recently, psychology's interest in correcting these misconceptions, are examined. Topic areas include sex-role stereotyping and androgyny, traditional and non-traditional roles of women, women and mental health issues, sexuality, culture and language, and health. (LA) Prerequisite: C or better in PSYC. 100
  TTh 2:30-3:45 Cynthia Miller  

WMST/PSYC 257-PSYCHOLOGY OF HUMAN SEXUALITY
An overview of human sexual behavior. Topics include sex and gender, biological factors, sexual development, interpersonal relationships, intimacy and love, communication, sexual orientation, pregnancy and bhth, contraception, abortion, sexual dysfunction, sexual diseases, sexual exploitation, legal and ethical issues. Gender differences and sex role behavior will be discussed, with special attention to the question of whether male and female behaviors differ, and how best to explain such differences. (LA) Prerequisite: C or better in PSYC 100
  TTh 2:30-3:45 Michael Brown  
 
WMST/AHIS 268- HISTORY OF WOMEN AND WOMEN'S MOVEMENTS IN THE U.S.
Survey of the changing status and role of women in American society. Main emphasis will be the origin and development of feminism from 19th century to the present, its ideology, and leadership and organization problems within the context of broader social change. (LA) Prerequisite: Sos or 3 s.h. 100-level HIST course.
  TTh 2:30-3:45 Susan Goodier  
 
ELIT 275-JANE AUSTEN
An intensive reading of novels such as Northanger Abbey, Pride and Prejudice, and Emma. Additional, related readings will cover topics such as Austen's biography, criticism, the history of the novel, and contemporary literary developments. Prerequisites: Comp 100 and LITR 100 or LITR 150.
  MWF
1:00-1:50 Bianca Tredennick  
 
WMST/PHED 280-WOMEN IN SPORTS
This course is a survey of American women's experience in sports from the 1860s to the present. History, philosophy, and gender theory will be discussed along with current issues such as title IX, women as sports professionals, the media and its influence, and governance of competitive sports. (LA) Prerequisite: Sos
  TTh 11:30-12:45 Colleen Cashman  
 
LITR 285-AUTOBIOGRAPHY, GENDER & CULTURE
This course will consider diverse life writings from a variety of cultural backgrounds, exploring the relationship between gender, culture, and the representation of the self in autobiography. We will combine close attention to how these autobiographies funct.ion as literary texts with how they challenge the generic and cultural conventions of traditional autobiography. To do so, we will pair texts to examine varying strategies of self-representation, including visual and graphic texts; postmodern and resistance nanĀ·atives. We will ask why autobiography has proved such a quintessentially "American" form of writing, while serving as an especially appealing (and enduring) form for writers from marginalized positions both within and outside the United States. We will especially address questions of generations, gender, and geme, as well as conceptions of identity, family, home, and belonging. (LA, WS2) Prerequisite: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150; or permission of instructor.
  MWF 12:00-12:50 Susan Bernardin  

WMST/ALS 291- GENDER, RACE AND SEXUALITY IN POPULAR CULTURE
This course addresses how popular culture - film, television, music, mass and digital media- reinforces conceptions of gender and sexuality, race and class. Using methodologies of gender, sexuality, and media studies, as well as critical race theory, we will examine the popular production, consumption, and reception of gendered social relations and roles. The course emphasizes critical inquiry regarding the production of normative and alternative gender and sexual identities, while noting their intersection with race, ethnicity class, and nationality. (LA) Prerequisite: None
  MWF 12:00-12:50 Jorge Estrada  
 
WMST/ELIT 294- SPTP: WOMEN AND MEDIEVAL LITERATURE
This course will survey medieval texts written by and about women in the forms of poetry, epic, romance, hagiography, fabliaux, religious writings, and histories from the Anglo-Saxon period to the high Middle Ages. Examination of texts will consider the presentations of women, gender, and sexuality, women's lives, and social and familial roles, especially as they conflicted with women's attempts to define themselves when they were denied such authority. Prerequisites: LITR 100 or LITR 150 or COMP 100 or permission of the Instructor
  MWF 2:00-2:50 Bambi Lobdell  
 
WMST/ALS 353- SEX & RACE IN SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Women & People of Color have a special, complex & Complicated relationship with science & technology. In historical moments they have been ignored & made invisible by science and technology, in others made objects without agency. Their experiences & their critique of these will be the object of this course which will seek to interrogate these histories & relationships as we consider how science & technology have treated sexed, gendered, ethno-raced, disabled individuals & groups and how they; in their turn have, & are transforming the workings of science and technology. Topics will include the politics of health & notmalcy, hormones, genes and productions of gender & identity; reflections on science & technologies as alienating or constitutive, as disconnecting or empowering, as producers of materiality & meaning, language of science& technology. Feminist and Critical Race critiques of Science & Technology, controversies over transplants, implants, conception, reproduction, surrogacy, immunity, immunization, contested illnesses & so on.
  TTh 11:30-12:45 Betty Wambui