Department of English

English Department Course Offerings Spring 2014

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

ALIT 207-01: SURVEY OF ENVIRONMENTAL LITERATURE (LA, AH2)
COURSE SUMMARY: There are two primary components to this class. The first is a survey of American environmental literature (or nature writing) that will consider such topics as American attitudes toward nature and the wilderness, the link between nature writing and literary nationalism, the spiritual aspects of nature study, the impact of nature writers on the growth of the conservation and environmental movements, and modern developments in literary environmentalism. Second, the course is a writing course that will draw from the students’ own experiences and writings about nature as well as their research and ideas about the writers and issues we will cover in class. In both cases, our considerations will primarily center on the ways in which we-both as individuals and as a society-interact with our environment. As befits a class on nature, outdoor sessions, including field trips, will be included in the curriculum.
FORMAT: Lecture/ discussion. Midterm, final, quizzes and writing assignment(s).
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150; or permission of instructor
TTh 2:30-3:45PM-PAYNE

ALIT 294-81: SpTp: LITERATURE OF ADDICTION (LA)
COURSE SUMMARY: The course will examine works that deal with addiction, specifically addiction to alcohol and/or drugs. Students will be required to engage diverse representations of addictions – their causes, effects, and the responses they engender from the afflicted. Students will also be expected to evaluate the works as specifically literary texts and not simply as sociological tracts on the evils of drugs and alcohol.
FORMAT: Students will be required to complete quizzes, in-class essay exams, an analytical essay written outside the class, under the advisement of the instructor, on a unique topic formulated in relation to one of the text.
TEXTS: Charles Bukowski, Ham on Rye ISBN# 9780061177583; Alice McDermott, Charming Billy ISBN# 9780312429423; Jack Kerouac, Dharma Bums ISBN# 9780143039600; Mary Karr, Lit ISBN# 9780061959684; Hunter Thomas, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas ISBN# 80679785897; John Fante, The Brotherhood of the Grape ISBN# 9780876857267; Charles Jackson, The Lost Weekend ISBN# 9780307948717; Bret Easton Ellis, Less Than Zero ISBN# 9780679781493
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100 and/or LITR 100
M 6-8:30PM – MEANOR

ALIT 394-01: SpTp: RACE AND THE AMERICAN SOUTH (LA)
COURSE SUMMARY: This course explores the rich literature of the American South related to race relations. Particular emphasis will be given to writers dealing with the struggle of African Americans for equality and self-determination.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: Douglass, Frederick, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (Dover, 1995), ISBN-10: 0486284999, Hurston, Zora Neale, Moses, Man of the Mountain (Harper Perrenial, 2008), ISBN-10: 0061695149, Kenan, Randall, A Visitation of Spirits (New York: Vintage, 2000), ISBN-13: 9780375703973)
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150; COMP 290 or COMP 200; LITR 250 or 6 s.h.
In 200 level ALIT, ELIT, or WLIT
MWF 2-2:50PM - HOVIS

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

COMP 150-01: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING (LA, WS2)
COURSE SUMMARY: This course provides a foundation in the basic theory and practice of fiction and poetry. By balancing workshops of student writing with discussions and analysis of published work (in contemporary world literature), students will be introduced to a range of models in these two genres that allow opportunities for students to express their own voices. Writing exercises and formal assignments will help students to develop proficiency in the technical aspects of fiction and poetry—such as structure, plot, characterization, point of view, writing dialogue, creating scenes, poetic voice, stanzaic development, rhythm, texture of sound, image and metaphor. Emphasis will also be placed on the creative writing process (including the role of revision in producing well-crafted work).
FORMAT: Reading and discussion, some lecture, formal analysis, in- and out-of-class writing, peer workshops, and conferences.
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
MWF 12-12:50PM – FERRARA

COMP 150-02: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING (LA, WS2)
COURSE SUMMARY: Workshop in imaginative writing (poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction). Open to all students. May be repeated for up to six s.h. credits.
FORMAT: Reading and discussion, in-class and take-home writing, peer workshops, private conferences.
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100.
MW 4-5:15 - FORD

COMP 150-03: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING (LA, WS2)
COURSE SUYMMARY: Workshop in imaginative writing (verse or prose). Open to all students. May be repeated for up to 6 s.h. credit.
FORMAT:TBA
TEXTS:TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100 TS: TBA
MWF 2-2:50PM - PELLETIER

COMP 150-04: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING (LA, WS2)
COURSE SUYMMARY: Workshop in imaginative writing (verse or prose). Open to all students. May be repeated for up to 6 s.h. credit.
FORMAT:TBA
TEXTS:TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100 TS: TBA
MWF 3-3:50PM – PELLETIER

COMP 150-81: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING (LA, WS2)
COURSE SUMMARY: Workshop in imaginative writing (poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction). Open to all students. May be repeated for up to six s.h. credits.
FORMAT: Reading and discussion, in-class and take-home writing, peer workshops, private conferences.
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100.
MW 5:30-6:45 - FORD

COMP 200-01: ADVANCED COMPOSITION (LA, WS2)
COURSE SUMMARY: Emphasizes advanced work in organization, style, and various rhetorical devices in expository writing. May be repeated for up to 6 s.h. credit.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: McGraw-Hill Reader, 10th ed., Joyce, Dubliners, Viking Criical Library, eds. Scholes & Litz; Strunk and White, Elements of Style, 4th Edition
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
TTh 2:30-3:45PM— MEANOR

COMP 200-02: ADVANCED COMPOSITION (LA, WS2)
COURSE SUMMARY: Extending the foundations of COMP 100, students can expect to focus on both general writing issues and their individual needs. This section of the course is organized around rhetorical strategies such as argumentation and analysis, but also focuses upon the proper role and use of outside source materials. Assignments will be grounded in readings of essays and will allow for creative topic development.
FORMAT: Students will be required to compose and revise at least six essays and to participate in in-class writing activities and peer evaluations.
TEXTS: TBA.
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
TTH 10-11:15AM - RICE

COMP 200-03: ADVANCED COMPOSITION (LA, WS2)
COURSE SUMMARY: Extending the foundations of COMP 100, students can expect to focus on both general writing issues and their individual needs. This section of the course is organized around rhetorical strategies such as argumentation and analysis, but also focuses upon the proper role and use of outside source materials. Assignments will be grounded in readings of essays and will allow for creative topic development.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA.
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
TTh 2:30-3:45PM – TULLY

COMP 200-04: ADVANCED COMPOSITION (LA, WS2)
COURSE SUMMARY: Extending the foundations of COMP 100, students can expect to focus on both general writing issues and their individual needs. This section of the course is organized around rhetorical strategies such as argumentation and analysis, but also focuses upon the proper role and use of outside source materials. Assignments will be grounded in readings of essays and will allow for creative topic development.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA.
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
TTh 4-5:15PM – TULLY

COMP 200-05: ADVANCED COMPOSITION (LA, WS2)
COURSE SUMMARY: This class focuses on advanced types of argumentative writing, such as satire and autoethnography. It also privileges style by encouraging students to learn to employ style as a means of supporting their arguments. Students will write several argumentative papers, including one which is to be a researched revision of an earlier paper. In addition, students will write several short papers in response to assigned readings.
FORMAT: Discussion
TEXT: Ways of Reading: An Anthology for Writers
PREREQUISITE: COMP 100
TTh 2:30-3:45PM – TREDENNICK

COMP 203-01: ADVANCED COMPOSITON: ENGLISH EDUCATION (LA)
COURSE SUMMARY: Emphasizes advanced work in organization, style, and various rhetorical devices in expository writing. This course is designed to be taken by Secondary Education – English dual majors, and includes discussion of current theories and practices for teaching writing in secondary schools.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PRERQUISITES: COMP 100, COMP 200 or COMP 290
W 4-6:30PM – MIKADO

COMP 239-01: TECHNICAL and PROFESSIONAL WRITING (LA, WS2)
COURSE SUMMARY: This class acquaints students with the principles of workplace and academic writing about science and technology and improves their communication of such topics. Although we will emphasize science and technology issues, students from all majors are welcome. Students will practice and learn (or learn more about) common forms of professional writing like the resume, letter, memo, proposal, and report. Students will produce such documents in the context of three major projects: (1) an employment project, in which students apply for a position in their field and interview a professional in that field; (2) an informative project, in which students investigate a science or technology issue related to their major and write a report for a decision maker in government or industry; and (3) a final client-based or service-learning project, such as instructional or marketing materials for a campus or community group (students in the sciences will be strongly encouraged to write a publishable journal paper as their final project). Other issues to be covered include questions of audience (how to adapt writing for expert vs. lay audiences), document design (how to make a text look attractive on paper or on screen), and collaborative project management (how to structure a complex writing task as a team).
FORMAT: Primarily discussion and workshops of student writing. In addition to the three major projects and participation in discussion and peer review sessions, students will be required to complete five short (one to two-page) writing assignments.
TEXT: Mike Markel, Technical Communication and Mukherjee, ed. The Best American Science and Nature Writing, 2013
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100 and SoS
TTh 4-5:15PM – BLACK

COMP 290-01: WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE
COURSE SUMMARY: The focus of this class is on moving from critical discussions of literature to writing critical analyses, with and without secondary sources for support. Students will learn both the basic mechanics involved in writing about literature (how to quote, paraphrase, summarize, and cite correctly) and different means of writing analytical essays about literature, from basic explications to research-informed essays.
FORMAT: In-class discussions, some lectures, and group work. Students will be required to write and revise several essays as part of the course.
TEXTS: Levithan, David. The Realm of Possibility. New York: Knopf, 2004. ISBN 9780375836572
MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. 7th ed. New York: MLA, 2009. ISBN 9781603290241, Burgess, Anthony. A Clockwork Orange. Norton Critical ed. New York: Norton, 2011. ISBN 9780393928099
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150; SoS
MWF 11-11:50AM – DOUGHTY

COMP 290-02: WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE (LA, WS2)
COURSE SUMMARY: This course teaches students to apply college writing skills to the discipline of literary studies. Students will increase proficiency in writing, researching, organizing, and revising skills in order to write successful papers in upper-division literature courses. Course builds on the skills learned in LITR 100 or LITR 150.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150; SoS
MWF 2-2:50PM – YATSUHASHI

COMP 390-01: EARLY LITERARY CRITICISM: IMITATING THE MASTERS (LA)
COURSE SUMMARY: In this seminar, students will submit short weekly writing exercises in imitation of seminal figures in the early history of literary theory and practice, beginning with the great authors and theorists of the Greek and Roman classical period, moving on to consider medieval mystics and humorists, advancing through the Renaissance poets and dramatists, and concluding with some investigations into the rhetorical theory and practice of the 19th century. Like classical, medieval and Renaissance scholars, the students in this class will hone their own composition and critical skills first by imitating the exemplars we will read together, and then by developing their own styles and voices.
FORMAT: We will divide our time equally between smaller and larger editing projects, starting the term with a study of the logic and stylistics of sentences, then completing some experiments in vocabulary enhancement and dictionary usage, and then moving on to consider the logic and presentation of larger arguments in paragraphs and full essay forms. Grading Weights: Quizzes, 10%; Midterm and Final Examinations 10% each; Short Weekly Writing Exercises 70%.
TEXTS: Patricia Bizzell and Bruce Herzberg, The Rhetorical Tradition: Readings from Classical Times to the Present (Boston: Bedford Books of St. Martin’s, 2001), 2nd edition, ISBN 0312148399; Richard A. Lanham, A Handlist of Rhetorical Terms (Berkeley: Univ. of Calif. Press, 1992), 2nd edition, ISBN 0520076699, William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing ((NY: Bantam, 1993), ISBN 0553-21301-6.
PREREQUISITES: SrS (or departmental waiver): Completion of LITR 150; COMP 290 or COMP 250; and LITR 250
MWF 3-3:50 PM – CRANE

COMP 390-02: THE ART OF BIOGRAPHY (LA)
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Biography has a long history as a distinct literary genre that has its roots in ancient Greece and Rome, where classical biographies such as Memorabilia by Xenophon, Lives of Caesars by Suetonius, and Plutarch’s Lives examined the lives of powerful, often controversial public figures. During the Middle Ages, the growing power of the Roman Catholic church in Europe moved the focus of biographical writing to inspirational accounts of the lives of religious figures such as martyrs and saints, and include such classics as Fox’s Book of Martyrs and the Confessions of Augustine. Beginning in the seventeenth century the genre of biography began to take on a more modern cast with works such as Izaak Walton’s Life of Donne (1640) and James Boswell’s Life of Johnson (1791). Twentieth-century works in biography have varied widely, ranging from the magisterial work of biographers such as Leon Edel and David McCullogh to thinly researched celebrity biographies. This course will examine how biography has developed as a literary form, with particular attention directed toward modern literary biographies.
FORMAT: Lecture/ discussion, research project.
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: SrS (or dept. waiver); LITR 150; COMP 200; LITR 150
T 6-8:30PM- PAYNE

COMP 394-81: SpTp: FORMS OF FICTION (LA)
COURSE SUMMARY: This course surveys a number of narrative forms, with an emphasis on twentieth-first century texts. Students explore these forms through extensive reading and creative writing emulations. Fictional forms include modes such as epic, allegory, bildungsroman, fiction of manners, psychological realism, epistolary fiction, dystopia narratives, magical realism, and postmodern parody and pastiche..
FORMAT: Lecture and Discussion, Student Presentations, Directed Writing, Examination.
TEXTS: Clyde Edgerton, The Floatplane Notebooks (Ballantine Books, 2004) ISBN-10: 0345419065 / ISBN-13: 978-0345419064, Hermann Hesse, Siddhartha, (Bantam Classics, 1981) ISBN-10: 0553208845 / ISBN-13: 978-0553208849, Edgar Allan Poe, Tales of Terror and Detection, (Dover Publications, 1995) ISBN-10: 0486287440 / ISBN-13: 978-0486287447, Edgar Allan Poe, The Gold-Bug and Other Stories
(Dover Publications, 1991) ISBN-10: 0486268756 / ISBN-13: 978-0486268750
PREREQUISITES: COMP 150 or COMP 270; or permission of instructor.
W 5:50-8PM - HOVIS

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

ELIT 240–01: MEDIEVAL ENGLISH LITERATURE (LA)
COURSE SUMMARY: In this course, we will explore a wide range of medieval literary genres (including myth, legend, hagiography, wisdom literature, romance, fabliau, dream vision, and lyric), reading tales of courtly love and chivalric battle, dragons, wizards, warlords, hermits, saints, and some truly spectacular sinners. We will also examine a number of medieval literary techniques (including allegorical composition and exegesis, as well as rhetorical ornamentation), and themes (including iconic imagery and rhetorical topoi). Students completing the course will also have acquired a overarching familiarity with the major events of medieval history (migratory patterns, economic and political evolutions, medical disasters, and religious / racial persecutions). Students will have practiced reading literary texts in a cultural and historical context, and writing about these texts from an historical as well as an aesthetic perspective. FORMAT: Lecture and class discussion. Grading Weights: Quizzes (12): 25%; Library Exercise: 5%; Thesis and Bibliography draft: 5%; Research Paper Outline, 5%; Research Paper (7-10-pages): 20%; Midterm Examination: 15%; Final Examination, cumulative: 25%.
TEXTS: - Jeffrey Gantz, Early Irish Myths and Sagas (New York: Penguin, 1981), ISBN 0-14-044397-5.Kevin Crossley-Holland, The Anglo-Saxon World (New York: Oxford, 2009), ISBN 0-199538719. Brian Stone, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (New York, Penguin, 1974), ISBN 0-14-044093-5. Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte D’Arthur, Vol. 2 (New York: Penguin, 1969), ISBN 0-14-143043-1. Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales (New York: Penguin, 1977), ISBN 0-14-044022-4.
PREREQUISITES: COMP100; LITR 100 OR LITR 150; ELIT 200.
MWF 2-2:50PM – CRANE

ELIT 245-01: BRITISH WRITERS OF THE ROMANTIC AGE (LA, AH2)
COURSE SUMMARY: Study of early nineteenth-century poetry and prose, including such writers as Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Byron and Keats. Texts include such subjects as: zombie sailors; man-cursing witches; sex-crazed lotharios; drug-induced fantasies; eight-foot tall reanimated corpses, and the occasional ode to a vase.
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150.
FORMAT: This is primarily a discussion course with occasional lectures. The major assignments consist of two formal papers and a project on poetry.
TEXTS: -- Norton Anthology of English Literature. Vol. D. The Romantic Period. Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. Ed. Maurice Hindle. Penguin: 2003. Others TBA.
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150.
TTh 4-5:15PM – TREDENNICK

ELIT 270-01 SHAKESPEARE (LA, AH2)
COURSE SUMMARY: This course focuses on a wide range of Shakespeare’s work and traces the development of his career from the 1590s through 1612. Increasing your understanding and enjoyment of Shakespeare’s plays and poems will be our primary goal. In addition to careful reading of these texts, we will consider their historical, biographical and cultural contexts. Toward that end, we will discuss Renaissance notions of love, friendship and family; the politics of poetry and court culture; and the impact of emerging “New World” discoveries on Shakespeare’s drama.
FORMAT: Combination of lectures & discussion; class attendance crucial; frequent writing assignments and quizzes, 2 essay exams, plus midterm and final exams.
TEXTS: The Norton Shakespeare: Essential Plays / The Sonnets. Ed. Stephen Greenblatt. Norton, 2008. ISBN-13: 978-0-393-93313-0
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
TTh 1-2:15PM - FININ

ELIT 394-01: SPTP: AUDEN, ISHERWOOD & THE 30’s
COURSE SUMMARY: Focused on the writing of W. H. Auden and Christopher Isherwood, this course will emphasize historical context and periodization. In addition to reading Auden’s poetry, Isherwood’s fiction, and some of the plays and travel narratives on which the two men collaborated, we will analyze their work in relation to major events of the late 1920s and the 1930s, such as Hitler’s rise to power and the Spanish Civil War. We will also question early descriptions of the writers of the 1930s as “The Auden Generation” and look at more recent critical approaches to the period and to our authors’ writing (especially queer theory). Although the course will emphasize Auden's and Isherwood’s writing up until their departure for the United States in 1939, we will also look briefly at some of their American works. FORMAT: will be mostly discussion with occasional presentations by students/ instructor; requires 2 papers (one short, one long), a midterm, and a final exam.
TEXTS: Isherwood, The Berlin Stories, Christopher and His Kind, and A Single Man; Auden: Collected Poems; Auden & Isherwood: The Ascent of F6 and Journey to a War. Selections from Hynes, The Auden Generation; Cunningham, British Writers of the Thirties, and Bozorth, Auden’s Games of Knowledge.
PREREQUISITES: LIT 250 or 9 s.h. Literature courses or consent of instructor
TTh 2:30-3:45PM – BLACK

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

LING 201-01: LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY (LA, AH2)
COURSE SUMMARY: Students will study how language is influenced by, among other things, region, class, culture, and gender. Students will learn how speakers move among different types of language communities through code switching and the problems that occur when people do not adapt to new linguistic situations.
FORMAT: A combination of lecture and discussion. In addition to taking several exams, students will be required to complete a written project.
TEXT: Edwards, John. Sociolinguistics: A Very Short Introduction. New York: Oxford UP, 2013. ISBN 9780199858613.
PREREQUISTIES: SoS or LING 150
MWF 9-9:50AM - DOUGHTY

LING 215-01: INTRODUCTION TO EDITING AND PUBLISHING (LA)
COURSE SUMMARY: Students will be introduced to the principles of editing, both copy-editing/ proofreading and more substantive content editing. The course will also include an overview of the publishing industry and discussion of careers within it. In the final part of the class, students will peer-review and edit each others’ writing in order to produce an online (or print) journal.
FORMAT: Primarily discussion and hands-on editing activities with mini-lectures and technology workshops as needed. I also hope to include some guest speakers with publishing industry experience. Assignments will include editing tests/ quizzes, a resume and query letter, a research paper, reader reports, and a final editor’s portfolio.
TEXTS: Saller, The Subversive Copy Editor; Hacker, Rules for Writers; Williams & Colomb, Style: Lessons in Clarity and Grace; and Norton, Developmental Editing.
PREREQUISITES: Sophomore standing and COMP 100
TTh 11:30AM-12:45PM – BLACK

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

LITR 150-01: INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDIES (LA)
COURSE SUMMARY: Introduction to Literary Studies is designed for those who are or wish to be English majors. It provides a foundation for the contexts, concepts, and methods relevant to the study of literature. Course coverage will include instruction in the use of relevant terminology and concepts, familiarization with literary and historical periods, and an overview of literary and genre conventions. The course should be taken within one year of declaring the major.
FORMAT: A combination of lecture and discussion. Frequent writing assignments and quizzes, 5-7 page paper, midterm and final exam.
TEXTS:Atwood, Margaret. Handmaid's Tale, New York: Random House (Anchor Books), 1998. ISBN 0-385-49081-X; Chekhov, Anton. Plays: Ivanov; The Seagull; Uncle Vanya; Three Sisters; The Cherry Orchard (Penguin Classics) Peter Carson (Translator), Richard Gilman (Introduction)ISBN-10: 0140447334; Foster, Thomas C. How to Read Literature Like a Professor: A Lively and Entertaining Guide to Reading Between the Lines. New York: Harper Perennial, 2003. ISBN: 0-06-000942X ; Murfin, Ross and Supryia M. Ray. The Bedford Handbook of Literary and Critical Terms. 3rd ed. Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2009. ISBN: 9780312461881.
PREREQUISITES: Declared English Major; or by permission of the Department.
TTh 10-11:15AM - FININ

LITR 150-02: INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDIES (LA)
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduction to Literary Studies is designed for those who are or wish to be English majors. It provides a foundation for the contexts, concepts, and methods relevant to the study of literature. Course coverage will include instruction in the use of relevant terminology and concepts, familiarity with literary and historical periods, and an overview of literary and genre conventions. The course should be taken within one year of declaring the major.
FORMAT: Lecture/ discussion. Midterm, final, two in-class writing assignments, research project.
TEXTS: Literature: Reading, Reacting, Writing (Compact Sixth Edition)— Kirszner & Mandel; A Glossary of Literary Terms—M.H. Abrams; The Island of Doctor Moreau—H.G. Wells
PREREQUISITES: Declared English major, or by permission of the department.
TTh 1-2:15PM- PAYNE

LITR 220-01: SHORT FICTION (LA, AH2)
COURSE SUMMARY: Appreciation and understanding of form and meaning in fiction through reading and analysis of selected works. We will be reading the stories in chronological order, after achieving a basic grounding in short-story history and theory (i.e., the instructor’s essay on “The American Short Story” in the Encyclopedia of American Literature, which will be distributed in class).
FORMAT: We shall be using a number of handouts by Mann, March, Forster, etc. We shall be reading the stories in The Norton Anthology chronologically, and will be getting a basic grounding in the history and theory of the American short story in Patrick Meanor’s essay on “The Short Story,” in the Encyclopedia of American Literature, editor, Steven Serafin, Continuum Press, 1999. (a handout). There will be two essay examinations and a final paper of 6 to 8 pages in length. There will be a reading quiz every class. Each essay examination (open book) will count 30%, the paper 25% and the quizzes 15%. You may not make up any quiz without a medical excuse. The student must meet with the teacher or the TA to determine the content of the paper.
TEXTS: The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction: Shorter: 7th Edition. Eds, R.V. Cassill and Richard Baush; The Stories of John Cheever, Random House; Joyce, Dubliners, Viking Critical Library, eds. Scholes and Litz
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
TTh 4-5:15PM – MEANOR

LITR 237-01: FANTASY (LA)
COURSE SUMMARY: Students will read a wide variety of fantasy fiction from both classic and contemporary authors of children’s and adult fantasy. Sub-genres of fantasy will be discussed, and students will analyze the literature in an attempt to create a definition of the term fantasy.
FORMAT: Class discussions, reading quizzes as needed. The primary method of evaluation will be through student writings and a presentation as well as the final exam.
TEXTS: Morris, William. The Wood Beyond the World. North Hollywood: Aegypan, 2006. ISBN: 9781598180695; Dunsany, Lord. King of Elfland’s Daughter. New York: Del Rey, 1999. ISBN: 9780345431912; Tolkien, JRR. The Fellowship of the Ring. New York: Houghton, 2012. ISBN: 9780547928210; LeGuin, Ursula K. A Wizard of Earthsea. New York: Houghton, 2012. ISBN: 9780547773742; McCaffrey, Anne. Dragonflight. New York: Random, 1986. ISBN: 9780345335463; Anthony, Piers. On a Pale Horse. New York: Random, 1986. ISBN: 9780345338587; Moore, Christopher. Practical Demonkeeping. New York: Harper, 2004. ISBN: 9780060735425; Gaiman, Neil. Stardust. New York: Harper, 2008. ISBN: 9780061689246; Collins, Suzanne. The Hunger Games. New York: Scholastic, 2010. ISBN: 9780439023528; Carey, Mike. The Unwritten: Tommy Taylor and the Ship that Sank Twice New York: Vertigo, 2013. ISBN: 9781401229764
PREREQUISITES: SoS
MWF 12-12:50PM – DOUGHTY

LITR 250-01: CRITICAL APPROACHES TO LITERATURE (LA, AH2)
COURSE SUMMARY: Exploration of the various approaches and techniques used in understanding and judging literary works; includes the reading of representative literary works, written criticism, critical theory, and practice in literary criticism. (LA, AH2)
TEXTS: TBA
FORMAT: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 150; 3 s.h. 200-level ALIT, ELIT, LITR or WLIT.
TTH 2:30-3:45PM – SADOW

LITR 285-01: AUTOBIOGRAPHY, GENDER AND CULTURE (LA, WS2)
COURSE SUMMARY: This course will consider diverse life writings from a variety of cultural backgrounds, exploring the relationship between gender, culture, and the representation of the self in autobiography. We will combine close attention to how these autobiographies function as literary texts with how they challenge the generic and cultural conventions of traditional autobiography. To do so, we will pair texts to examine varying strategies of self-representation, including visual and graphic texts; postmodern and resistance narratives. We will ask why autobiography has proved such a quintessentially “American” form of writing, while serving as an especially appealing (and enduring) form for writers from marginalized positions both within and outside the United States. We will especially address questions of generations, gender, and genre, as well as conceptions of identity, family, home, and belonging.
FORMAT: A mixture of lecture and discussion. Short essays; exams; memoir writing.

TEXTS: may include Ecology of a Cracker Childhood; Persepolis; When a Crocodile Eats the Sun; The Glass Castle; Fun Home.
Prerequisites: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150; or permission of instructor.
MWF – 12-12:50PM - BERNARDIN

LITR 394-01: SpTp: POSTMODERNISM (LA)
COURSE SUMMARY: This class will be a study of postmodernism, a major intellectual movement of the second half of the twentieth century that challenged modern ideas about literature and culture. In addition to reading novels and short stories, we will look at developments in film, music, art, and architecture, and discuss questions this movement raised about knowledge, representation, narrative, originality, media, and society. We will study fiction by writers such as Jorge Luis Borges, Samuel Beckett, John Barth, Italo Calvino, Thomas Pynchon, Angela Carter, Milan Kundera, Paul Auster, and Jeanette Winterson; essays by theorists such as Francois Lyotard, Jean Baudrillard, and Linda Hutcheon; music by composers such as Philip Glass and Julia Wolfe; and films by directors such as David Lynch, Jean-Luc Godard, Peter Greenaway, Jane Campion, and Pedro Almodovar.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: LITR 150 or FREN 208 or SPAN 208 or PHIL 201 or MCOM 151; or by permission of instructor.
TTh 11:30AM-12:45PM - SADOW

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

WLIT 200-01: WORLD LITERATURE—ANCIENT TO MEDIEVAL (LA)
COURSE SUMMARY: In this course, we will explore the origins and influence of ancient texts from Mesopotamia, Persia, India, Greece, China, and Japan. Gilgamesh recounts a heroic quest for eternal life, and the Ramayana features the hero Rama who must save his wife Sita from the evil king Lanka. The Greek play “Lysistrata” is a comic account of several women's extraordinary mission to end the Peloponnesian War. We will also read the Persian classic The Conference of Birds, an allegory that recounts a quest to meet the great Simorgh. Finally, readings in core Confucian and Daoist texts from China provide the social and cultural context for The Pillow Book, written in Japan’s Heian period by Sei Shonagon; it portrays the highly aesthetic life of the medieval Japanese court.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: Gilgamesh: A New English Version, Stephen Mitchell (trans), ISBN-10: 0743261690, The Ramayana: A Modern Retelling of the Great Indian Epic, Ramesh Menon, North Point Press , ISBN-10: 0865476950, Four Plays by Aristophanes: The Birds; The Clouds; The Frogs; Lysistrata, Plume, ISBN-10: 0452007178, Chinese Civilization: A Sourcebook, Patricia Buckley Ebrey, Free Press; 2 Rev Exp edition, ISBN-10: 002908752X, The Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon, Columbia University Press, ISBN-10: 0231073372, The Conference of Birds, Farid al-Din Attar, Penguin Books, ISBN 0140444343, The Masnavi, Book One, Jalal al-Din Rumi, Oxford, ISBN-13: 978-0199552313
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
MWF 2-2:50PM – FERRARA

WLIT 225-01: THE GREEK DRAMATIST (LA, AH2)
COURSE SUMMARY: Close study and critical discussions of selected plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150
MWF 1-1:50PM - YATSUHASHI

WLIT 281-01: THE CHINESE NOVEL (LA, HO2)
COURSE SUMMARY: One of the great masterpieces in world literature, Dream of the Red Chamber recounts the story of two mythological lovers destined to repay a debt of tears in the red dust human world. Reborn into an extravagantly wealthy bondservant family in the Qing dynasty (1644-1911), they lead a cultured life of ease in Prospect Garden. Yet, decadence and corruption outside of the garden walls results in the ruin of their noble family and to the estrangement of the would-be lovers. Much more than a simple love story, Dream is a profound meditation on finding meaning in a transitory world. During the semester, we will explore East Asian culture, history, and philosophy through the prism of this enchanting narrative.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: The Story of the Stone (vol.1): Golden Days, Cao Xueqin (author), Penguin, ISBN: 0140442936,Story of the Stone (vol. 2): Crab Flower Club, Cao Xueqin, Penguin, ISBN 0140443266, Story of the Stone (vol.3): The Warning Voice, Cao Xueqin, Penguin, ISBN 0140443703, Story of the Stone (vol.4): The Debt of Tears, Cao Xueqin, Penguin, ISBN: 0140443711, Story of the Stone (vol 5): The Dreamer Wakes, Cao Xueqin, Penguin, ISBN: 014044372X, Between Noble and Humble: Cao Xueqin and the Dream of the Red Chamber, by Ruchang Zhou (Author), ISBN-13: 978-1433104077
PREREQUISITES: LITR 100 or LITR 150
MWF 3-3:50PM – FERRARA

WLIT 271–01: POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURE: THE AMERICAS (LA)
COURSE SUMMARY: This course serves as an introduction to postcolonial literary studies by focusing on coming-of-age stories in colonial contexts within the Americas. More specifically, we will examine how selected Francophone and Anglophone Caribbean writers, indigenous writers from North America, and Latino/a writers use literature to represent the making and un-making of colonial subjects. We will read short fiction, novels, and memoirs as well as screen some films that explore the complex relationships between language and identity, gender and race, education and resistance. Some critical essays on postcolonial theory will help us to think historically and comparatively.
FORMAT: A combination of lecture and discussion, with emphasis on frequent in-class work and several formal assignments.
TEXTS: Readings may include works by Merle Hodge, Patrick Chamoiseau, LeAnne Howe; Eric Gansworth, Sherman Alexie, Junot Díaz.
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150; or permission of instructor
MWF 10-10:50AM - BERNARDIN

WLIT 317-01: YEATS (LA)
COURSE SUMMARY: This course examines the life and career of the Nobel prize-winning Irish poet William Butler Yeats, whose politics and poetics have figured prominently in recent debates on nationalism and gender within the fields of Irish cultural and postcolonial studies. We will study some of the traditional topics in the study of Yeats’s writing: for example, the doctrine of the mask and Yeats’s construction of himself in his poems and autobiographical writing; his place in two literary histories, the history of late 19th-century romanticism (or aestheticism) and the history of literary modernism; Yeats’s political uses of his literary identity and authority; and his beliefs in the transcendent and universal. We will also investigate recent interpretations of Yeats’s work and life, especially those that study Yeats’s writing in light of the forces that inspired the poet himself: nationalism, colonialism, gender and literature.
FORMAT: A mixture of lecture and discussion. Students will complete weekly quizzes, several short essays, a research-informed essay (approx. 10-12 pages), and deliver one oral presentation on their research project.
TEXTS: Yeats, the Man and the Masks (Ellmann, Richard. Norton 2000); Yeats’s Poetry, Drama and Prose (Pethica, James. Norton 2000); and W.B. Yeats: A Beginner’s Guide (Startup, Frank. Hodder & Stoughton, 2002).
PREREQUISITES: LITR 100 or 150; 6 s.h. of ENGL
TTh 11:30AM-12:45PM—MORGAN-ZAYACHEK

WLIT 394/FREN 394 SP TP: YOUTH CULTURE & DELIQUENCY
COURSE SUMMARY: This course explores literature and film from France and the Francophone world, focusing on the figure of the juvenile delinquent. We will examine how these works portray young characters who rebel against the social childhood and youth, education, poverty, morality, social norms, and the role of law in society. The course will thus bring together questions relating to marginalized cultures, race, ethnicity, class, and creative expression. We will read texts by authors such as Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Victor Hugo, Arthur Rimbaud, Andre Gide, Jean Genet, Jean-Paul Sarte, Kateb Yacine, Leila Sebbar, and Mehdi Charef. We will also watch films by the likes of Jean Vigo, Francois Truffaunt, Mathieu Kassovitz, and Abdellatif Kechiche.
FORMAT: Course will be conducted in English: French majors will read and write their papers in French.
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100, and one of the following: FREN 208 209, or 210, or LITR 100 or 150
MWF 1-1:50- FIENI

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT