Department of English

English Department Course Offerings Spring 2013

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

ALIT 200-01: AMERICAN LITERATURE TO 1865 (LA, AH2)

                                                                                               
COURSE SUMMARY: A survey of American literature from the colonial era to the Civil War, including works by Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Edgar Allan Poe, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Frederick Douglass, and Harriet Beecher Stowe.
FORMAT: Lecture/ discussion. Midterm, final, and short quizzes.
TEXTS: Norton Anthology of American Literature, Package I (include Hawthorne’s, The Scarlet Letter)
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
MWF 10-10:50AM - PAYNE

 

ALIT 250-01:  AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE (LA, AH2)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course is designed to expose the student to a side of American literature to which they have rarely had access.  The course aims to bring about a better understanding of Black literature and the motives which generated it since the turn of the 20th century.  In particular, we shall be reading the fiction of some of the most outstanding Black women writers of recent years.  This is an introductory course which should stimulate all those interested in the vitality of the African-American experience.
FORMAT:  Midterm and final exam plus short written responses to works every week.  Final grade dependent on papers, exams and class participation.
TEXTS:  Works by Alice Walker (The Color Purple), Ellison, Wright, Baldwin, Morrison and others.
ADDITIONAL COMENTS:  Open to all majors and honor students.  This course is cross-listed as ALS 250 (Africana-Latino Studies)
PREREQUISITES: SoS; COMP 100 or ALS 100
TTh 1-2:15PM – CHOONOO

 

ALIT 351-01:   LITERATURE OF THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE (LA)
                                                                                                                                               
COURSE SUMMARY: This course looks at the glorious outburst of literature by African Americans during the decade of the 1920s. This period, known as the Harlem Renaissance, stands out in literary history as one of the most significant developments in American literature.  The course surveys the works of the most important African American writers of the Renaissance: Jean Toomer, Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, Alan Locke, Jessie Fauset, Zora Neale Hurston, et al.
FORMAT: Two essay exams and a paper are required.
TEXTS: Hughes, Selected Poems of Langston Hughes (Vintage, 1974); Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God (Harper & Row, 1990); Johnson, Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man (Vintage, 1989); Larsen, Passing (Penguin, 1997); Lewis, Poetry Harlem Renaissance Reader (Penguin 1997); Lewis, When Harlem Was in Vogue (Penguin, 1994); Toomer, Cane (Norton, 1988), A course package is required.
NOTE: This course is cross-listed as ALS 351.
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100 or ALS 100; LITR 250 or ALS 273; or permission of instructor.
TTh 2:30-3:45PM - CHOONOO

 

ALIT 394-01:  BEAT WRITERS (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: The early 1950s saw the emergence of a literary subculture that, by the end of the decade, exploded to become an international force. The Beat movement grew out of a friendship of a handful of writers residing in New York and traveling at times to San Francisco, Mexico City, Paris, and Tunisia. Through their avant garde  experiments in prose and poetry styles, their fusion of writing with jazz improvisational techiques, spiritual questing, and their adventures in the bohemian world of drugs, sex, and wayward traveling, these writers tapped into a powerful anti-establishment force running just below the surface of American culture. The Beat movement was not, however, the singular creation of a small group of white men; it tapped into a vibrant network literary scenes (San Francisco Renaissance, Black Mountain, The New York School) with their system of readings and small presses, nightclubs and bars that nurtured and supported the movement. This course will explore the world of the Beat movement, the work of its principal figures (Kerouac, Ginsberg, Burroughs, Snyder, Corso), and the important contributions of African-American and Women writers (Amiri Baraka, Ted Joans, Diane DiPrima), too-often overshadowed by the Beat legend. We will also explore the legacy of the Beat movement through the work of selected artists, musicians, and writers of the 1970s and 80s.
FORMAT:  TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES:  LITR 150, LITR 250, or permission of instructor
TTh 11:30AM-12:45PM – HECHT

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

COMP 150-01:  INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING (LA, WS2)

COURSE SUMMARY:  This course provides a foundation in the basic theory and practice of fiction and poetry. By balancing workshops of student writing with discussions and analysis of published work (in contemporary world literature), students will be introduced to a range of models in these two genres that allow opportunities for students to express their own voices. Writing exercises and formal assignments will help students to develop proficiency in the technical aspects of fiction and poetry—such as structure, plot, characterization, point of view, writing dialogue, creating scenes, poetic voice, stanzaic development, rhythm, texture of sound, image and metaphor. Emphasis will also be placed on the creative writing process (including the role of revision in producing well-crafted work).
FORMAT:  Reading and discussion, some lecture, formal analysis, in- and out-of-class writing, peer workshops, and conferences.
TEXTS:The Practice of Creative Writing, Heather Sellers, ISBN# 978-0312436475, The World's Greatest Short Stories, James Daley, ISBN# 978-0486447162, A Book of Luminous Things: An International Anthology of Poetry, Czeslaw Milosz, ISBN# 978-0156005743,
Students should also anticipate the expense of photocopying their writing for workshop.
PREREQUISITES:  COMP 100
TTh 4-5:15PM – FERRARA

 

COMP 150-02:  INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING (LA, WS2)

COURSE SUMMARY: Workshop in imaginative writing (verse or prose).
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: Traverse-Locke, Dominique. The Goodbye Child (paperback).  Aldrich Publishing (May 29, 2012).  ISBN-10: 0615642004 / ISBN-13: 978-0615642000,   Flash Fiction Forward: 80 Very Short Stories (paperback). W. W. Norton & Company; 1 edition (August 17, 2006). ISBN-10: 0393328023 / ISBN-13: 978-0393328028, Land, Brad. Goat: A Memoir (paperback).  Random House Trade Paperbacks (March 1, 2005).  ISBN-10: 0812969685 / ISBN-13: 978-0812969689
PREREQUISITES:  COMP 100
MW 4-5:15PM – FORD

 

COMP 150-03: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING (LA, WS2)

COURSE SUMMARY: Workshop in imaginative writing (verse or prose).
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: Bell, Madison Smartt. Narrative Design: Working with Imagination, Craft, and Form. W.W. Norton. ISBN: 978-0-393-32021-3;  Addonizio, Kim and Dorianne Laux. The Poet's Companion: A Guide to the Pleasures of Writing Poetry. W.W. Norton. ISBN: 978-0-393-31654-4.
PREREQUISITES:  COMP 100
MWF 12-12:50PM – PELLETIER

 

COMP 150-04: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING (LA, WS2)

COURSE SUMMARY: Workshop in imaginative writing (verse or prose).
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: Bell, Madison Smartt. Narrative Design: Working with Imagination, Craft, and Form. W.W. Norton. ISBN: 978-0-393-32021-3;  Addonizio, Kim and Dorianne Laux. The Poet's Companion: A Guide to the Pleasures of Writing Poetry. W.W. Norton. ISBN: 978-0-393-31654-4.
PREREQUISITES:  COMP 100
MWF 1-1:50PM – PELLETIER

 

COMP 150-81:  INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING (LA, WS2)

COURSE SUMMARY: Workshop in imaginative writing (verse or prose).
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: Traverse-Locke, Dominique. The Goodbye Child (paperback).  Aldrich Publishing (May 29, 2012).  ISBN-10: 0615642004 / ISBN-13: 978-0615642000,   Flash Fiction Forward: 80 Very Short Stories (paperback). W. W. Norton & Company; 1 edition (August 17, 2006). ISBN-10: 0393328023 / ISBN-13: 978-0393328028, Land, Brad. Goat: A Memoir (paperback).  Random House Trade Paperbacks (March 1, 2005).  ISBN-10: 0812969685 / ISBN-13: 978-0812969689
PREREQUISITES:  COMP 100
MW 5:30-6:45PM – FORD


COMP 200-01:   ADVANCED COMPOSITION (LA, WS2)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course extends the foundations established in COMP 100. Students can expect attention to be paid to both general writing issues and their individual needs. This section of the course is organized around rhetorical strategies such as argumentation and analysis, but it also focuses upon the real needs of college writers—such as the proper role and use of outside source materials. Assignments are grounded in common readings of essays on American popular culture and literature: these assignments allow for creative topic development.
FORMAT: This is a Portfolio-Review course: the work of the semester culminates in the submission of a student-driven portfolio that presents the best work of the term; extensive revision of drafts is the norm. The portfolio accounts for 50% of the final grade. Regular individual conferences focused on major-assignment revision will take up the majority of class time after mid-semester. A reading/writing journal, minor assignments, and occasional quizzes make up the remaining 50% of the final grade.
TEXTS:  Troyka, Lynn Quitman and Douglas Hesse. Quick Access Reference for Writers (5rd edition). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2001; Axelrod, Rise B. and Charles R. Cooper. Reading Critically, Writing Well (7th edition). Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s Press, 2002; Graff, Gerald and Cathy Birkenstein. They Say / I Say: the Moves That Matter in Academic Writing. New York: W. W. Norton, 2009 (2006).
PREREQUISITE: COMP 100.
TTh 8:30-9:45AM - LEE

 

COMP 200-02:   ADVANCED COMPOSITION (LA, WS2)

COURSE SUMMARY: Emphasizes advanced work in organization, style, and various rhetorical devices in expository writing. May be repeated for up to 6 s.h. credit.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXT: TBA
PREREQUISITE:
COMP 100
TTh 2:30-3:45PM - MAHONEY

 

COMP 200-03:   ADVANCED COMPOSITION (LA, WS2)

COURSE SUMMARY: Emphasizes advanced work in organization, style, and various rhetorical devices in expository writing. May be repeated for up to 6 s.h. credit.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXT: TBA
PREREQUISITE:
COMP 100
TTh 2:30-3:45PM - MAHONEY
 

COMP 200-04:   ADVANCED COMPOSITION (LA, WS2)

COURSE SUMMARY: Emphasizes advanced work in organization, style, and various rhetorical devices in expository writing. May be repeated for up to 6 s.h. credit.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS:  McGraw-Hill Reader, 10th ed., Joyce, Dubliners, Viking Critical Library, eds. Scholes & Litz; Strunk and White, Elements of Style, 4th Edition
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
TTh 4-5:15PM - MEANOR

 

COMP 200-05:  ADVANCED COMPOSITION (LA, WS2)

COURSE SUMMARY: This class focuses on various forms of argumentative writing. Reading, writing, and discussion will focus on substantive social issues, often through the lens of popular culture such as advertisement, television shows, and so on. Assignments include three thesis-driven arguments, one autoethnography, as well as several short response papers.
FORMAT: Discussion
TEXT: Ways of Reading: An Anthology for Writers
PREREQUISITE: COMP 100
MW 2-3:15PM – TREDENNICK            

 

COMP 200-06:  ADVANCED COMPOSITION (LA, WS2)

COURSE SUMMARY: This is an advanced course in expository and argumentative writing that continues the work of COMP 100. In this class, we will work on developing strong thesis statements, the skill of close reading and scene analysis, the effective use of evidence, and fundamental research skills. In order to develop these skills, we will focus on substantive social issues, often through the lens of non-fiction, literature, and popular culture.
FORMAT: Discussion
TEXT: TBA
PREREQUISITE:
COMP 100
TTh 2:30-3:45PM – YATSUHASHI        

 

COMP 203-01: ADVANCED COMPOSITION (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: Emphasizes advanced work in organization, style, and various rhetorical devices in expository writing. This course is designed to be taken by Secondary Education-English dual majors, and includes discussion of current theories and practices for teaching writing in secondary schools.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXT: TBA
PREREQUISITE:
COMP 100
TTh 8:30-9:45AM – MIKODA   

 

COMP 260-01:  POETRY WORKSHOP (LA, WS2)

COURSE SUMMARY: This class is designed to provide a space where students can dedicate themselves to developing both their writing and their understanding of poetry.  Our purpose is to create situations (rhetorical, logistical, psychological, intellectual) in which we can create poetry and learn to discern what works in our own writing and in others’. The course will have two primary components: composition and critique.  On the composition end, we will focus on generating poems, grasping hold of the formal aspects of poetry, and widening our perspectives the varieties of poetry written today.  To this end, class time will be spent discussing a wide range of published works, performing invention exercises, and generating all kinds of in-class writing.  On the critique end, we will devote a significant portion each class to discussing and assessing student work.  Critique is not simply a matter of deciding if a given poem is good or bad, successful or unsuccessful.  It is a means of understanding what effects a writer is trying to accomplish, sharing influences, discussing the purposes of a work, and in every way helping each other produce interesting work.  To effectively critique poetry it is necessary to further enhance our understanding of poetry as a genre and a practice.  To that end, we will focus on developing a critical understanding of the work of established poets through discussion and research.
Format:  In-class writing, discussion/evaluation of student work, field trips.  Students will be responsible for a presentation and paper on the work of an individual poet.
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: "B" or higher in COMP 150; or permission of instructor. 
A poetry workshop works best when student come to class with a good understanding of poetry, its structures, and its history. While it is not a requirement, students who are not yet familiar with the American poetry canon should consider taking ALIT 210 in addition to this course.
TTh 4-5:15PM  - HECHT

 

COMP 290-01:  WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE (LA, WS2)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course teaches students to apply college writing skills to the discipline of literary studies. Students will increase proficiency in writing, researching, organizing, and revising skills in order to write successful papers in upper-division literature courses. Course builds on the skills learned in LITR 100 or LITR 150 and is only open to English majors/minors. Should be taken in the sophomore year.
FORMAT: This is primarily a discussion course with frequent writing workshops. Weekly informal writing assignments, both in and outside of class, 4-5 papers.
TEXTS: MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. 7th ed. New York: MLA, 2009. ISBN 9781603290241; others TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100 and LITR 100 or LITR 150; SoS. 
MWF 9-9:50AM – FININ


COMP 310-81:   SCREENWRITING WORKSHOP                                                                                                        

COURSE SUMMARY: This course will cover fundamentals of screenwriting such as plot structure, character development, dialogue, and screenplay format. Practical aspects of screenwriting such as creating an effective synopsis and treatment, marketing your script, and legal protection of screenplays will also be discussed.
FORMAT: Workshop with lectures, class discussions, and individual conferences. To facilitate the discussion of work submitted for this class, work will be submitted on Angel.  Because of the workshop format of this class, students should be prepared to read and discuss their own work and that of their fellow students openly, honestly, and without rancor.
TEXTS: Writing Movies: The Practical Guide, Movie Magic Screenwriter: Software
PREREQUISITES: “B” in COMP 150 or permission of the instructor.
T 5:30-8PM - PAYNE

 

COMP 390-01:   CAPSTONE SEMINAR: URBAN FANTASY

COURSE SUMMARY: Students will explore urban fantasy texts, both written and film, and examine their place in the larger fantasy genre as well as in literary studies. Students will choose an aspect of urban fantasy to research throughout the semester, culminating in a seminar paper.
FORMAT: Students will write a prospectus, a working bibliography, a review of literature, and a rough and final draft of a seminar paper. Additional writings and/or quizzes may be assigned.
TEXTS: Required: Black, Holly. Tithe. New York: McElderry, 2004. ISBN: 9780689867040; Bull, Emma. War for the Oaks. 1987. New York: Orb-Doherty, 2001. ISBN: 9780765300348; Gaiman, Neil. Neverwhere. New York: Harper, 1998. ISBN: 9780380789016; Harrison, Kim. Dead Witch Walking. New York: Harper, 2004. ISBN: 9780060572969; James, Edward, and Farah Mendlesohn, eds. The Cambridge Companion to Fantasy Literature. New York:Cambridge UP, 2012. ISBN: 9780521728737; Miéville, China. The City & the City. New York: Random, 2010. ISBN: 9780345497529; Riordan, Rick. The Red Pyramid. New York: Hyperion, 2011. ISBN: 9781423113454
Recommended:
MLA Handbook for Writes of Research Papers. 7th ed. New York: MLA, 2009. 9781603290241
PREREQUISITE: LITR 150, COMP 200 or COMP 290, and LITR 250, SrS (or departmental waiver)
MWF 11-11:50AM - DOUGHTY

 

COMP 390-02:   CAPSTONE SEMINAR: PERSONAL ESSAY   

COURSE SUMMARY:In this course, we will survey the history of the personal essay genre, reading exemplary essays drawn from the Western and Eastern traditions, from the 4th-century B.C.E. Characters of Theophrastus to the essays currently posted on Salon.com.  We will consider how the genre has been molded to meet the needs of specific individuals in specific cultural settings–taking the forms of descriptive portraiture, topical reflection, didactic moralizing, and impassioned autobiography, and sometimes overlapping with the field of creative non-fiction.  We will chart the evolution of the essay form as the assigned authors work beyond proposing the individual character as a topic suitable for rhetorically crafted presentation to the more creative project of inventing a “self” whose qualities and opinions merit expository development.  Students will choose a research topic early in the term and submit preliminary bibliographies and drafts as they prepare the research essay which will be due at the end of the semester.  We will focus on research techniques and on the importance of drafting and revision, and we will practice editing in class. 
FORMAT: Students will be expected to complete weekly on-line assignments of various kinds (reading responses, along with grammar and style exercises). Because those exercises will be submitted on-line, this class is offered in “blended” format, with two class meetings per week and the third class meeting replaced by on-line work.  Grading: Class Presentations (2), 10%; Grammar and Style Exercises (5), 10%; Writing Exercises (6), 20%; Preliminary Research Bibliography, 5%; Annotated Research Bibliography, 5%; Research Essay Outline, 5%; Research Essay Draft, 10%; Research Essay Final Version, 25%; Final Examination (On-line), 10%.
TEXTS:Phillip Lopate, The Art of the Personal Essay (New York: Random House, 1994), ISBN 0-385-42339-X.
PREREQUISITES: SrS (or department waiver); completion of LITR 150, COMP 200, and LITR 250
MWF 12-12:50PM - CRANE

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

ELIT 247-01:  20th CENTURY ENGLISH WRITERS (LA, AH2)

COURSE SUMMARY: English novels, short stories, plays, and poetry written in the 20th century.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXT: TBA
PREREQUISITE:
SoS or 3 s.h. humanities
TTh 1-2:15PM - BLACK

 

ELIT 270-01:   SHAKESPEARE (LA, AH2)

COURSE SUMMARY:This course is offered as a “blended” course, combining in-class meetings (Mondays and Wednesdays) with on-line exercises on Fridays, when we will not be meeting in the classroom.  The course will provide students with an overarching view of Shakespeare’s poetry and plays, beginning with an exploration of his sonnets and continuing with readings in the dramatic genres of comedy, history, tragedy and romance. We will be concerned this term not only with Shakespeare’s unique genius, but also with understanding the cultural forces (political, religious, and economic) shaping Shakespeare’s world-view, language and literary techniques.  Frequent in-class screenings of individual scenes from Shakespeare’s plays will introduce students to the rich variety of stage and film interpretations of the texts. 
FORMAT: Reading comprehension and vocabulary exercises will develop the students reading and language skills, familiarize the students with the conventions and vocabulary of Shakespeare criticism, and, most importantly, help students to develop their own interpretations of Shakespeare’s oeuvre as they become more familiar with the cultural and/or biographical contexts of the assigned readings.  Grading:  2% Practice Exercise; 23% Quizzes (6); 15%       Reading Comprehension Exercises (5); 15%Vocabulary Exercises (6); 10% Poetics Exercises (3); 15% Midterm Examination; 20% Final Examination. 
TEXTS:William Shakespeare, The Sonnets and Narrative Poems:  The Complete Non-Dramatic Poetry, ed. William Burto (NY: Signet), ISBN 0-451-52314; Midsummer Night's Dream, ed. David Bevington (NY: Bantam), ISBN 0-55321300-8; Henry IV, Part One, ed. David Bevington (NY: Bantam), ISBN 0-553-21293-1; Merchant of Venice, ed. David Bevington (NY: Bantam), ISBN 0-553-21299-0; King Lear, ed. David Bevington (NY: Bantam) ISBN 0-553-21297-4; The Tempest, ed. David Bevington (NY: Bantam) ISBN 0-553-21307-5.
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
MWF 2-2:50PM - CRANE

 

ELIT 294-01:  STAGING THE RENAISSANCE (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course explores the wide array of plays written in early modern England, including those by Christopher Marlow, Thomas Middleton, Ben Jonson, Elizabeth Cary, John Webster, and Mary Wroth among others. The plays from this period stage astonishing displays of violence against the body, detailed examinations of the merchant world in London, wide-spread legal corruption, and/or cross-dressing characters who contest gender assumptions, to name just a few of the plays’ concerns. While our primary objective is to read the plays closely, we will also examine the rapid rise of theatrical culture and consider how the drama both reflected and participated in the profound changes occurring throughout English culture.
FORMAT:
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100, LITR 100 or LITR 150, or permission of instructor
MW 1-2:15PM – FININ

 

ELIT 364-01:  DICKENS (LA)
                       
COURSE SUMMARY: Consideration of Dickens as a novelist and as a critic of society through three major works. We will see such things as insane teachers; secret identities; an array of gory murders; one of the first detectives in fiction; witch-like, crazed old women; resurrections from the dead; and the occasional spontaneous human combustion.
FORMAT: This is primarily a discussion course with occasional lectures. Major assignments consist of two formal papers and a final exam.
TEXTS: Dickens, Charles. Bleak House. Ed. Nicola Bradbury. Penguin: 2003. ISBN: 9780141439723. Dickens, Charles. Great Expectations. Ed. Charlotte Mitchell. Penguin: 2002. ISBN: 9780141439563.Dickens, Charles. Our Mutual Friend. Ed. Adrian Poole. Penguin: 1998. ISBN: 9780140434972.
PREREQUISITES: Junior standing.
MWF 1-1:50PM - TREDENNICK

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

LING 210-01:   TRADITIONAL GRAMMAR: ENGLISH (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: Students will examine the grammar of English from a sentence structure perspective. Beginning with sentence patterns, they will progress to parts of sentences and how the sentences are constructed to make meaning. They will also discuss the relationship of grammar to mechanics in writing.
FORMAT: In-class discussions and exercises, as well as some lecture. The primary evaluation will be through several exams.
TEXT: Packet of materials
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; SoS
MWF 8-8:50AM - DOUGHTY

 

LING 215-01:   INTRODUCTION TO EDITING AND PUBLISHING (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY
: Students will be introduced to the principles of editing, both copy-editing/ proofreading and more substantive content editing. The course will also include an overview of the publishing industry and discussion of careers within it. In the final part of the class, students will peer-review and edit each others’ writing in order to produce an online (or print) journal.
FORMAT: Primarily discussion and hands-on editing activities with mini-lectures and technology workshops as needed. I also hope to include some guest speakers with publishing industry experience. Assignments will include editing tests/ quizzes, a resume and query letter, a research paper, reader reports, and a final editor’s portfolio.
TEXTS: Epstein, Book Business; Saller, The Subversive Copy Editor; Norton, Developmental Editing; plus a style guide and a small coursepack
PREREQUISITES: SoS and COMP 100
TTh 2:30-3:45PM - BLACK

 

LING 320-01:   HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: Introduction to the development of the English language from its earliest known stage to present-day British and American English. Topics include the continuous change of language in its main aspects of sound; word formation, syntax, and vocabulary; the cultural influences on change and their reflection in the language; and social attitudes affecting language usage.
FORMAT:
TEXTS:
PREREQUISITES:
JrS and 3 s.h. LING or 6 s.h ALIT/ELIT
W 2-4:30PM - PERKINS

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

LITR 150-01: INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDIES (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: Introduction to Literary Studies is designed for those who are or wish to be English majors. It provides a foundation for the contexts, concepts, and methods relevant to the study of literature. Course coverage will include instruction in the use of relevant terminology and concepts, familiarization with literary and historical periods, and an overview of literary and genre conventions. The course should be taken within one year of declaring the major.
FORMAT: A mixture of lecture and discussion. Frequent writing assignments and quizzes, midterm, 5-7 page paper, and final exam.
TEXTS: Literature: Reading, Reacting, Writing. Compact 6th edition by Laurie and Stephen R. Mandell, Thomson/Wadsworth, 2007; Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte (Ed. Stevie Davies) Penguin Classics, 2006; The Cherry Orchard by Anton Chekhov, Penguin, 2002.
PREREQUISITES: Declared English Major; or by permission of the Department.
MWF 11-11:50AM - FININ

LITR 150-02: INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDIES (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: Introduction to Literary Studies is designed for those who are or wish to be English majors. It provides a foundation for the contexts, concepts, and methods relevant to the study of literature. Course coverage will include instruction in the use of relevant terminology and concepts, familiarity with literary and historical periods, and an overview of literary and genre conventions. The course should be taken within one year of declaring the major.
FORMAT: Lecture/ discussion. Midterm, final, two in-class writing assignments, research project.
TEXTS: Literature: Reading, Reacting, Writing (Compact Sixth Edition)— Kirszner & Mandel; A Glossary of Literary Terms—M.H. Abrams; The Island of Doctor Moreau—H.G. Wells
PREREQUISITES: Declared English major, or by permission of the department.
MWF 2-2:50PM - PAYNE

LITR 220-81: SHORT FICTION (LA, AH2)

COURSE SUMMARY: Appreciation and understanding of form and meaning in fiction through reading and analysis of selected works.
FORMAT: Since the course is a survey of this interesting genre, we will be reading works in chronological order beginning with some of the earliest versions of the form. At the same time, we will be reading a few works that speak to basic issues in the history and theory of the genre's development. There will be two essay examinations, a final paper of 6 to 8 pages in length, and students can expect a reading quiz at the start of every class. You may not make up any quiz without a medical or other College-approved excuse. Students will need to confer with the instructor to determine the content of the final paper.
TEXTS: The Story and Its Writer: An Introduction to Short Fiction (7th edition). Ann Charters, Ed. Bedford / St. Martin's, 2003. ISBN: 0-312-39729-1
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
M 5-8:30PM - LEE


LITR 244-01: CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE (LA, AH2)

COURSE SUMMARY: In this class, students study a wide range of literature (novels, short stories, plays, and poetry) by contemporary North American, African, Asian, Caribbean, and Middle Eastern writers. Our focus will be on contextualizing these works both historically and culturally and to exploring their religious and philosophical dimensions. The variety of genres and countries represented (Turkey, Japan, Nigeria, Trinidad, Mexico, and the United States) mean that comparative approaches to literary studies will be encouraged.
FORMAT:A mixture of lecture and discussion, research essays, group projects, reading quizzes, as well as a midterm and final exam
TEXTS: The Museum of Innocence, Orhan Pamuk,Vintage, ISBN-10: 0307386244, Collected Plays: Volume 2, Wole Soyinka, Oxford University Press, ISBN-10: 0192811649, Blow-Up: And Other Stories, Julio Cortazar, Pantheon, ISBN-10: 0394728815, Norwegian Wood, Haruki Murakami,Vintage, ISBN-10: 0375704027, The Vintage Book of Contemporary American Poetry, J.D. Mcclatchy (Editor),Publisher: Vintage; Rev Exp edition,
ISBN-10: 1400030935, Stories from Blue Latitudes: Caribbean Women Writers, Elizabeth Nunez, Seal Books,
ISBN-10: 1580051391
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150; or permission of Instructor
TTh 2:30-3:45PM – FERRARA


LITR 250-01: CRITICAL APPROACHES TO LITERATURE (LA, AH2)

COURSE SUMMARY: Exploration of the various approaches and techniques used in understanding and judging literary works; includes the reading of representative literary works, written criticism, critical theory, and practice in literary criticism.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 150; 3 s.h. 200-level ALIT, ELIT, LITR or WLIT.
MWF 1-1:50PM – SADOW


LITR 286-01: GENDER & GEOGRAPHY: WOMEN'S ENVIRONMENTAL WRITING (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course uses gender as a central lens through which to examine human relationships with the natural world. Through personal and critical essays, creative nonfiction, memoir, poetry, and novels, we will trace the complicated relationship between the status of nature and the status of women. At the same time, diverse writers will put into question assumptions governing the "nature" of nature. Theoretical and critical readings from scholars who write at the intersections of science and literature will complement the course's focus on how contemporary women writers connect their writing of place with attention to toxicity and women's health; the global climate crisis; ecofeminism; indigenous activism; environmental racism.

TEXTS: may include Terry Tempest Williams' Refuge; Sandra Steingraber, Living Downstream; Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn's Half the Sky; Janisse Ray's Ecology of a Cracker Childhood; Louise Erdrich's The Round House, among others.
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150 or permission of instructor.
TTh 10-11:15AM - BERNARDIN


LITR 306-01: CHILDREN'S LITERATURE (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course explores the diverse literatures for children and adolescents, particularly the multicultural and generic variety of literatures available. Students will read books from a variety of American and international children's authors and situate the texts within the children's literary tradition. Emphasis will be on literary analyses of these children's and adolescent texts. (LA)
FORMAT: A combination of lecture and discussion. Students will write short analyses of texts on Angel discussion boards, write a short paper, give a presentation, and complete a final exam.
TEXTS: (subject to change) Harrison, Kim. Once Dead, Twice Shy. New York: Harper, 2010. ISBN: 9780061441684; Jansson, Tove. Moominland Midwinter. New York: Macmillan, 2010. ISBN: 9780312625412; Kipling, Rudyard. The Jungle Book. New York: Dover, 2000. ISBN: 9780486410241; Lin, Grace. Year of the Dog. New York: Little, 2007. ISBN: 9780316060028; Morales, Yuyi. Just a Minute!: A Trickster Tale and Counting Book. San Francisco: Chronicle, 2003. ISBN: 9780811837583; Peters, Julie Anne. Keeping You a Secret. New York: Little, 2005. ISBN: 9780316009850; Richardson, Justin, and Peter Parnell. And Tango Makes Three. Illus. Henry Cole. New York: Simon, 2005. ISBN: 9780689878459; San Souci, Robert D. Cendrillon: A Caribbean Cinderella. Illus. Brian Pinkney. New York: Simon, 2002. ISBN: 9780689848889; Sendak, Maurice. Where the Wild Things Are. New York: Harper, 1988. ISBN: 9780064431781; Sheth, Kashmira. Monsoon Afternoon. Atlanta: Peachtree, 2008. ISBN: 9781561454556; Sterling, Shirley. My Name Is Seepeetza. Toronto: Groundwood [distributed by Group West Books out of Berkeley, CA], 1998. ISBN: 9780888991652;Tingle, Tim. Crossing Bok Chitto: A Choctaw Tale of Friendship and Freedom. Illus. Jeanne Rorex Bridges. El Paso: Cinco Puntos: 2008. ISBN: 9781933693200;
Wadsworth, Ginger. Camping with the President. Illus. Karen Dugan. Honesdale, PA: Boyd Mills, 2009. ISBN: 9781590784976;Williams-Garcia, Rita. One Crazy Summer. New York: Harper, 2011. ISBN: 9780060760908
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100, and LITR 150, and 6 s.h. of 200-level ENGL coursework.
MWF 9-9:50AM - DOUGHTY

 

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

WLIT 201-81:  RENAISSANCE TO 18TH CENTURY (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: We will study the poetry, prose, and drama of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.  This will be an international look at the period, focusing on the ways that ideas about literature, art, and culture traveled across nations. We will look at shifting prose genres--including fiction and the essay--innovation in theater, and new ideas about poetry.  We will also examine associated developments in aesthetics, gender, philosophy, colonialism, and politics.
FORMAT: Discussion and Lecture
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITE: COMP 100.
W 5-8:30PM - SADOW

 

WLIT 212-01:  SURVEY OF GREEK AND ROMAN LITERATURE (LA, HW2)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course offers an introduction to various genres of Greek and Roman literature, including epic, lyric poetry, tragedy, comedy, philosophy, history, and satire.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITE: COMP 100.
TTh 4-5:15PM - YATSUHASHI

 

WLIT 225-01: THE GREEK DRAMATISTS (LA, AH2)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course will focus on selected plays of each of the three tragedians, Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides. Although the plays are the product of a particular historical moment–5th century BBC Athens–the tragedies raise large and complex issues which concern us today. Greek tragedy explores central questions about the nature of human behavior, the social structures of public and private life, and the problematic relationship between gods and human beings. Violence, crime, and conflict are prominent among its themes, particularly conflict within the family, the battle between the sexes, and the competing claims of household and state. We shall study these plays in their social and cultural context, but also consider the wider implications which they dramatize. And last but not least we will consider the staging of these plays for both the Athenian and American audience as well as assessing how several of the tragedies have been translated into Hollywood films.
FORMAT:
TEXTS: To be announced
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150
TTh 10-11:15AM - RICE

 

WLIT 268-81:   READINGS IN JAMES JOYCE (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY:  The course will consist of in-depth reading and analysis of the three major works of James Joyce:  Dubliners, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, and Ulysses.  We shall concentrate on the ways in which James Joyce used local, literary, and mythic allusions in his works to uncover the chaos, despair, and paralysis in the modern world, and to create a meaningful world through the vitality and life-sustaining energies of the imagination.
FORMAT:  TBA
TEXTS:  Joyce, Dubliners, Viking Critical Library, eds. Scholes & Litz;  A Portrait of the Artist as Young Man, Viking Critical Library, ed., Anderson, Ulysses, Vintage Books, Random House, 1990, no other edition of Ulysses will do. James Joyce Quarterly (Milne Library) The New Bloomsday Book, (latest edition);
W 6-8:30PM - MEANOR

 

WLIT 271–01:     POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURE: THE AMERICAS (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course serves as an introduction to postcolonial literary studies by focusing on coming-of-age stories in colonial contexts within the Americas. More specifically, we will examine how selected Francophone and Anglophone Caribbean writers, indigenous writers from North America, and Latino/a writers use literature to represent the making and un-making of colonial subjects. We will read short fiction, novels, and memoirs as well as screen some films that explore the complex relationships between language and identity, gender and race, education and resistance. Some critical essays on postcolonial theory will help us to think historically and comparatively.
FORMAT: A combination of lecture and discussion, with emphasis on frequent in-class work and several formal assignments.
TEXTS: Readings may include works by Merle Hodge, Patrick Chamoiseau, Deborah Miranda, Sherman Alexie, Junot Díaz.
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150; or permission of instructor
TTh 11:30-12:45AM - BERNARDIN

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT