English Department Course Offerings Fall 2017

 
 
ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

 

ALIT 200-01 AMERICAN LITERATURE TO 1865  (LA, H3)

COURSE SUMMARY: We will survey the literature produced in America until the end of the Civil War, including work produced by Native Americans, the Puritans, and representatives of the Age of Enlightenment, the American Renaissance, and the early period of American Realism. Genres will include poetry, fiction, essays, and autobiography.
FORMAT: Lecture and discussion. Frequent quizzes and three exams. Regular attendance and class participation are expected.
TEXTS: The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Pkg. 1 (Vols. A & B): Lit to 1865 (SIXTH Edition)(New York, W.W. Norton, 2002)  ISBN: 0-393-97793-5 General Editor, Nina Baym
PREREQUISITES:  COMP 100
MW 4-5:15pm - HECHT

ALIT 216-01 MODERN AMERICAN FICTION (LA, H3)

COURSE SUMMARY:  Study of American fiction from the turn of the twentieth century to World
War II.   Readings include novels, novellas, and short stories by writers such as Jack London, Edith Wharton, Willa Cather, Ernest Hemingway, Zora Neale Hurston, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Thomas Wolfe, and Sherwood Anderson.  We will explore readings as various manifestations of three literary modes prevalent during the period:  Realism, Naturalism, and Modernism.
FORMAT: Reading and discussion, lecture, quizzes, exams, directed writing.
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150.
MWF 1:00-1:50 pm - HOVIS

ALIT 250-01 AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE (LA, H3)

COURSE SUMMARY: A study of works by African-American writers since 1890. The forms studied will include novels, short stories, plays, and poems.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS
: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; SoS or ALS 100.
TTh 32:30-3:45pm - KARAGEORGOS

 

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

 

COMP 150-01 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING  (LA, BC3)

COURSE SUMMARY: Workshop in imaginative writing (verse or prose).
FORMAT:
TEXTS:  TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
TTh 4-5:15pm-TULLY

 COMP 150-02  INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING (LA, BC3)

COURSE SUMMARY: Workshop in imaginative writing (verse or prose).
FORMAT:
TEXTS:  TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
MWF 12:00-12:50pm-VOGEL

 COMP 150-81 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING (LA, BC3)
 
COURSE SUMMARY: This course provides a solid foundation in the basics of theory and practice in fiction and poetry. The course balances workshop of student writing with a discussion of published work (focusing on contemporary writing, especially in fiction). The purpose of the course is to introduce students to a range of models in these two genres and to provide opportunities for students to express their own voices by emulating these models.While students will likely find that the reading skills they develop in this course will improve their performance in other literature courses, we will pursue a somewhat different focus than that to which they may be accustomed; we will "read as writers," paying particular attention to the technical aspects of fiction and poetry writing—such as structure, plotting, character development, point of view, writing dialogue, creating scenes, poetic voice, stanzaic development, rhythm, texture of sound, image and metaphor. Instead of focusing primarily on what the stories and poems we read mean, we will spend considerably more time discussing how they mean. We will also address the writing process.
FORMAT: Reading and discussion, lecture, formal analysis, in- and out-of-class writing, peer workshops, quizzes, final exam, and conferences.
TEXTS:  TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
W 5:30-8:00pm-HOVIS

 COMP 200-02 ADVANCED COMPOSITION (LA, BC3)

COURSE DESCRIPTION: In this section of COMP200, we will divide our time equally between smaller and larger editing projects.  We will begin with a study of the logic and stylistics of sentences and then move on to construct larger arguments in paragraphs and full essay forms.We will consider how the visual functions of metaphor and simile can facilitate communication, and will look at how visual elements combine with texts in two graphic novels, which will be the subject of several writing exercises. This hybrid class will require frequent on-line exercises which will replace our Friday class meetings, so that we will meet in class only on Mondays and Wednesdays.
FORMAT: Lecture, discussion and in-class exercises. Library Research Preparation Exercise, 5%; Grammar Exercises (6): 25%; Writing Exercises (6): 25%; Quizzes (6): 25%; Midterm Examination (1): 10%; Final Examination (1): 10%.
TEXTS: Required texts: John Langan and Beth Johnson, English Essentials (New York: McGraw Hill, 2005), ISBN 0-07-304326-5; Michael Harvey, The Nuts and Bolts of College Writing (Indianapolis: Hackett, 2003), ISBN 0-87220-573-8; Alan Moore, Dave Gibbons and John Higgins, Watchmen (New York: DC Comics, 1995), ISBN 978-0-930289-23-2; Art Spiegelman, Maus: A Survivor’s Tale (New York: Pantheon, 1986), ISBN 0-394-74723-2.Recommended Texts: A good college dictionary of student’s choice (e.g., Webster=s Collegiate); A good thesaurus of student’s choice (e.g., Roget=s).
PREQUISITES: COMP 100 or equivalent.
MWF 12-12:50pm-CRANE

COMP 260-81 POETRY WORKSHOP ( LA, BC3)

COURSE SUMMARY: This class is designed to provide a space where students can dedicate themselves to developing both their writing and their understanding of poetry. Our purpose is to create situations (rhetorical, logistical, psychological, intellectual) in which we can create poetry and learn to discern what works in our
own writing and in others’. The course will have two primary components: composition and critique. On the composition end, we will focus on generating poems, grasping hold of the formal aspects of poetry, and
widening our perspectives the varieties of poetry written today. To this end, class time will be spent discussing
a wide range of published works, performing invention exercises, and generating all kinds of in-class writing.
On the critique end, we will devote a significant portion each class to discussing and assessing student work. Critique is not simply a matter of deciding if a given poem is good or bad, successful or unsuccessful. It is a
means of understanding what effects a writer is trying to accomplish, sharing influences, discussing the purposes of a work, and in every way helping each other produce interesting work.To effectively critique poetry it is necessary to further enhance our understanding of poetry as a genre and a practice. To that end, we will focus on developing a critical understanding of the work of established poets through discussion and research.
FORMAT: In-class writing, discussion/evaluation of student work, field trips.Students will be responsible for
a presentation and paper on the work of an individual poet.
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: "B" or higher in COMP 150; or permission of instructor.
A poetry workshop works best when student come to class with a good understanding of poetry, its structures, and its history. While it is not a requirement, students who are not yet familiar with the American poetry canon should consider taking ALIT 210 in addition to this course.
T 5:30-8pm - HECHT

COMP 290-01 WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE (LA, BC3)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course teaches students to apply college writing skills to the discipline of literary studies. Students will increase proficiency in writing, researching, organizing, and revising skills in order to write successful papers in upper-division literature courses. Course builds on the skills learned in LITR 100 or LITR 150.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150; SoS.
TTh 11:30AM-12:45pm-SADOW

COMP 390-01 THE POET AND THE PRINCESS: SAPPHO AND CLEOPATRA AND LIT.

COURSE SUMMERY: "This class will explore two ancient figures, Sappho and Cleopatra, in both ancient and modern texts.  Beginning with ancient texts, the course will closely examine the content of the poetry of Sappho as well as biographical works about both figures.  We will then go on to examine later works, such as Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra and Carman's Sappho: One Hundred Lyrics, studying the ways in which they respond to, reimagine, and redefine the two woman."
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS:
TBA
PREREQUISITES:
Srs (or departmental waiver); completion of LITR 150, COMP 200 or COMP 290, and LITR 250.
MWF 2:00-2:50pm -YATSUHASHI


ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

 

ELIT 200-01 BEGINNINGS TO EARLY RENAISSANCE (LA, H3)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course surveys the overall shape of early British literature, including Celtic myth, Anglo-Saxon heroic tales, Arthurian legend, courtly love poetry, and Shakespearean comedy.We will consider how various cultures contribute magical, religious, and political materials to the evolution of British literature, and we will examine various modes of literary interpretation, including allegory and symbolism. The hybrid format of this course (combining in-class meetings Mondays and Wednesdays with on-line work replacing class meetings on Fridays) allows students to develop their writing, vocabulary, and reading comprehension skills through on-line exercises.
FORMAT: Lecture and Discussion. Grading Weights: 29% Quizzes (in class); 15% Writing Exercises; 31% On-line Exercises reviewing readings, lectures, and vocabulary; 15% Midterm Examination (in class); 10% Final Examination (on-line).
TEXTS: Christopher Baswell and Anne Howland Schotter, eds., The Longman Anthology of British Literature, Vol. 1A: The Middle Ages (New York, Pearson Longman, 2010), paperback, ISBN 978-0-205-65530-4; Constance Jordan and Clare Carroll, eds., The Longman Anthology of British Literature, Vol. 1B: The Early Modern Period (New York, Pearson Longman, 2006), paperback, ISBN 978-0-205-65532-8.
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100 or equivalent.
MWF 3-3:50PM-CRANE

ELIT 270-01 SHAKESPEARE (LA, H3)

COURSE SUMMARY:  The course will provide students with an overarching view of Shakespeare’s poetry and plays, beginning with an exploration of his sonnets and continuing with readings in the dramatic genres of comedy, history, tragedy and romance. We will be concerned this term not only with Shakespeare’s unique genius, but also with understanding the cultural forces (political, religious, and economic) shaping Shakespeare’s world-view, language and literary techniques.  Frequent in-class screenings of individual scenes from Shakespeare’s plays will introduce students to the rich variety of stage and film interpretations of the texts.  On-line reading and vocabulary exercises will develop the students’ study skills, familiarize the students with the conventions and vocabulary of Shakespeare criticism, and, most importantly, help students to develop their own interpretations of Shakespeare’s oeuvre as they become more familiar with the cultural and/or biographical contexts of the assigned readings.   
FORMAT: This hybrid course will meet on Mondays and Wednesdays, with Friday class time devoted to on-line exercises. In-class meetings will combine lecture and discussion. Grading Weights: 1% Practice Exercise; 39% Quizzes (6); 15% Reading-Comprehension Exercises (5); 10% Vocabulary Exercises (6); 10% Poetics Exercises (3); 15% Midterm Examination; 10% Final Examination.  
TEXTS: William Shakespeare, The Sonnets and Narrative Poems:The Complete Non-Dramatic Poetry, ed. William Burto (NY: Signet), ISBN 0-451-530896; Midsummer Night's Dream, ed. David Bevington (NY: Bantam), ISBN 0-55321300-8; Henry IV, Part One, ed. David Bevington (NY: Bantam), ISBN 0-553-21293-1; Merchant of Venice, ed. David Bevington (NY: Bantam), ISBN 0-553-21299-0; King Lear, ed. David Bevington (NY: Bantam) ISBN 0-553-21297-4; The Tempest, ed. David Bevington (NY: Bantam) ISBN 0-553-21307-5.
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100 or equivalent.
MWF 2-2:50pm-CRANE

ELIT 272 -01 17TH-CENTURY ENGLISH LITERATURE (LA, H3)

COURSE SUMMARY: We will spend time studying the poetry, prose, and drama of the Jacobean through Restoration periods.We will focus on shifting ideas in art and philosophy, Milton, metaphysical and libertine poetry, the civil war, and Restoration theater.
FORMAT: Discussion and lecture
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITEs: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150
TTh 23:30-3:45pm-SADOW

ELIT 294 SpTp: BRONTES (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: When one thinks of the Bronte sisters, one sees women who never left their desolate, rural house, out in the wilds of the English moors. Devoid of opportunities for social interaction, for marriage, for education, they turned inward and created fantastic worlds of their own, ultimately writing some of the most significant novels of the nineteenth century, including Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights. Only such a twisted, tortured environment could foster the unique genius of these three strange sisters. Wait ... that's a load of crap. The truth is that actually the Brontë myth bears very little relationship to the reality. So how did these three sisters produce so much good (and sometimes) even great literature? How do their novels emerge from their particular time periods? And what explains the lasting appeal of their work to modern audiences? We'll read novels such as Agnes Grey, Wuthering Heights and Villette to try to tackle the myths and answer some of these questions..
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: Anne Bronte, Agnes Grey or Tenant of Wildfell Hall (TBD), Emily Bronte, Wuthering Heights, Charlotte Bronte, Vilette, and selected poetry.
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100, LITR 100 or LITR 150.
TTh 10:00-11:15am-TREDENNICK

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

 

LING 210-01 TRADITIONAL GRAMMAR: ENGLISH (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: Students will examine the grammar of English from a sentence structure perspective. Beginning with sentence patterns, they will progress to parts of sentences and how the sentences are constructed to make meaning. They will also discuss the relationship of grammar to mechanics in writing.
FORMAT: In-class discussions and exercises, as well as some lecture. The primary evaluation will be through several exams.
TEXT: Packet of materials
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; SoS
MWF 8-8:50am-DOUGHTY

LING 322: VARIETIES OF AMERICAN ENGLISH (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course will explore the different varieties and dialects of English in the United States, including both regional and cultural variations, from the first English settlements to the present. Coverage will also include the impact of other languages on American English. Prerequisite: LING 201 or JrS.
FORMAT: A combination of lecture and discussion. Students will complete a project or research essay related to aspects of American English, as well as take several exams.
TEXT: TBD
PREREQUISITES: LING 201 or JrS.
MWF 12:00-12:50pm-DOUGHTY


ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

 

LITR 150-02 INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDIES (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: Introduction to Literary Studies is designed for those who are or wish to be English majors. It provides a foundation for the contexts, concepts, and methods relevant to the study of literature. Course coverage will include instruction in the use of relevant terminology and concepts, familiarization with literary and historical periods, and an overview of literary and genre conventions. The course would be taken within one year of declaring the major.
FORMAT: A mixture of lecture and discussion. Research essay, project, reading quizzes, as well as a midterm and final exam
TEXTS: Demolished Man, Alfred Bestor, ISBN-13: 978-1596879881, Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury, ISBN-13: 978-1451673319, Brave New World, Aldous Huxley, ISBN-13: 978-0060850524, Animal Farm: 1984, George Orwell, ISBN-13: 978-0151010264, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, P.K. Dick, ISBN-13: 978-0345404473, The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood, ISBN-13: 978-0385490818, Gun, with Occasional Music, Jonathan Letham, ISBN-13: 978-0156028974, Lilith's Brood, Octavia E. Butler, ISBN-13: 978-0446676106 
PREREQUISITES: Declared English Major; or by permission of the Department
TTh 4:00-5:15pm-FERRARA

LITR 150-03 INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDIES (LA)

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduction to Literary Studies is designed for those who are or wish to be English majors. It provides a foundation for the contexts, concepts, and methods relevant to the study of literature. Course coverage will include instruction in the use of relevant terminology and concepts, familiarity with literary and historical periods, and an overview of literary and genre conventions. The course should be taken within one year of declaring the major.
FORMAT: Lecture/ discussion. Midterm, final, two in-class writing assignments, research project.
TEXTS: Literature: Reading, Reacting, Writing (Compact Sixth Edition)- Kirszner & Mandel; A Glossary of Literary Terms-M.H. Abrams; The Island of Doctor Moreau-H.G. Wells
PREREQUISITES: Declared English major, or by permission of the department.
MWF 1:00-1:50pm- PAYNE

LITR 247 ENVIRONMENTAL HUMANITIES (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: This is a lecture and discussion course that explores the various ways that the humanities help us understand the relationship between humans and the environment. Insights from literature, philosophy, religious studies, and the arts will be employed in this endeavor. To achieve sustainability we need to explore human values, perceptions, beliefs, fears, and cultural inclinations in shaping humanity's relationship the natural world and human landscapes we have created. A deep understanding of the humanities and humanistic methodologies is a necessary component of the interdisciplinary solution of environmental problems we face such as global climate change and loss of biodiversity.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITTES: SoS
MWF 2:00-2:50pm - PAYNE

LITR 250-01 CRITICAL APPROACHES TO LITERATURE (LA, H3)

COURSE SUMMARY: Exploration of the various approaches and techniques used in understanding and judging literary works; includes the reading of representative literary works, written criticism, critical theory, and practice in literary criticism.
TEXTS: TBA
FORMAT: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 1003 s.h. 200-level ALIT, ELIT, LITR or WLIT.
TTH 4:00-5:15pm-SADOW

LITR 284 WRITING THE LAND: LITERATURE OF PLACE (LA, H3)

COURSE SUMMARY: Explores encounters with the natural world as articulated in creative nonfiction, fiction, essays and poetry. Emphasis placed on diverse representations of the environment, as understood through varied cultural and social perspectives. For the fall, students will have the opportunity to build intercultural knowledges as part of SUNY COIL: collaborative online international learning. A third of this class (5-6 weeks) will address the relationship between popular culture and representations of place, gender, and sexuality in Colombia and the United States. We are partnering with a language class at Universidad del Norte, in Barranquilla, Colombia to examine perceptions of each other's cultures and to identify differences and commonalities across our differences. Students will collaborate with student partners on a series of projects designed to enhance cross-cultural understanding.
FORMAT: discussion; innovative online collaborative work with partners at Uninorte, Barranquilla.
TEXTS: Our course materials will include memoir, fiction, essays, film and televisual media.
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; and LITR 100 or LITR 150
MWF 1:00-1:50pm - BERNARDIN

LITR 308 QUEER LITERATURE (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course will look at literature spanning the last three hundred years to investigate attitudes and concepts Pertaining to queer identities and lives, the queer struggle for identity creating, social legitimacy, acceptance and the fight for equality - and the corresponding heteronormative backlash. Critical exploration of literature will follow an intersectional approach that examines the connections among race, sexed embodiment, gender, class and sexual orientation in relation to concepts that frame the meanings of bodies within social contexts. Students will have opportunities to do queer readings of some traditional texts, to see how the meaning changes when characters are not assumed to be heterosexual, gender normative, or cis-gendered. In addition to essays, letters, diaries, memoirs, pomes, short stories, songs, plays, and novels, students will also read selections on queer theory to guide their readings.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: SoS; LITR 250 or 3 s.h. of any WMST course.
MW 4-5:15pm-LOBDELL

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

 

WLIT 227 SEX & GENDER IN GREEK LITERATURE (LA, H3)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course explores gender in ancient Greek literature by examining the roles of men and women in Greek society, how the Greeks defined the categories of male and female, and how concepts of masculinity and femininity shaped Greek literature, mythology, and daily life.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; and LITR 100 or LITR 150
MWF 1:00-1:50pm-YATSUHASHI

WLIT 257 MODERN BLACK LITERATURE (LA, OW3)

COURSE SUMMARY: A study of Black Literature written since 1950, using fiction, essays, poetry, and biography (or autobiography) to illustrate the development and influence of contemporary Black writers.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100, SoS or ALS 100
TTh 11:30am-12:45pm - KARAGEORGOS

WLIT 315-01 ANCIENT RELIGIOUS WRITINGS (LA, OW3)

COURSE SUMMARY: his course explores ancient religious writings in a global context and includes coverage of Hindu, Buddhist, Confucian, Daoist, Judeo-Christian, and Islamic traditions. Our focus will be on reading primary source materials and contextualizing them historically, culturally, and spiritually, which means reading (in English translation) from the Sanskrit and Pali canons, the Analects, the Zhuangzi, the Bible, and the Quran—among other works. 
FORMAT: TBA
TEXT: The Upanishads: A Classic of Indian Spirituality, Eknath Easwaran, ISBN-13: 978-1586380212
The Bhagavad Gita, Eknath Easwaran, ISBN-13: 978-1586380199, Readings in Classical Chinese Philosophy, Philip J. Ivanhoe, Hackett, ISBN-13: 978-1603844680, The Heart of the Buddha's Teaching: Transforming Suffering into Peace, Joy, and Liberation, Thich Nhat Hanh, ISBN-13: 978-0767903691
Robert Carroll, The Bible: Authorized King James Version, ISBN-10: 9780199535941, The Nag Hammadi Scriptures, Marvin W. Meyer, HarperOne, ISBN-13: 978-0061626005, The Qur'an (Oxford World's Classics), M. A. S. Abdel Haleem, ISBN-13: 978-0199535958, Maya: A Novel, C.W. Huntington, Wisdom, ISBN-13: 978-1614291985
PREREQUISITES: LlTR 100 or LITR 150 and 6 s.h. of 200-level ENGL coursework, or permission of instructor.
TTh 11:30am-12:45pm - FERRARA