Department of English

English Department Course Offerings Fall 2014

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

ALIT 200-01: AMERICAN LITERATURE TO 1865 (LA, AH2)

COURSE SUMMARY: We will survey the literature produced in America until the end of the Civil War, including work produced by Native Americans, the Puritans, and representatives of the Age of Enlightenment, the American Renaissance, and the early period of American Realism. Genres will include poetry, fiction, essays, and autobiography.
FORMAT: Lecture and discussion. Frequent quizzes and three exams. Regular attendance and class participation are expected.
TEXTS: The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Pkg. 1 (Vols. A & B): Lit to 1865 (SIXTH Edition)(New York, W.W. Norton, 2002) ISBN: 0-393-97793-5 General Editor, Nina Baym
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
TTh 2:30-3:45pm - HECHT

ALIT 210-01: AMERICAN POETRY (LA, AH2)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course is a study of the range and styles and formal innovations that embody American Poetry during the Modernist era. Beginning with the works of Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman, we will explore the significant movements that effectively changed the shape poetry. Poets we will study include the major Modernist figures (Ezra Pound, T. S. Eliot, William Carlos Williams, Robert Frost, E.A. Robinson, Marianne Moore), Langston Hughes and writers of the Harlem Renaissance, and representative of early post-war movements--the San Francisco Renaissance (Beat) and Confessional poets.
FORMAT: A combination of lecture and discussion, web-based reading responses, quizzes, exams, and research paper. Students will also be responsible for a short, in-class presentation on a individual poet.
TEXTS: Anthology of American Poetry, Carey Nelson, ed.
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150; or permission of instructor.
TTh 4-5:15pm - HECHT

ALIT 250-01: AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE (LA, AH2)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course is designed to expose the student to a side of American literature to which they have rarely had access. The course aims to bring about a better understanding of Black literature and the motives which generated it since the turn of the 20th century. In particular, we shall be reading the fiction of some of the most outstanding Black women writers of recent years. This is an introductory course which should stimulate all those interested in the vitality of the African-American experience.
FORMAT: Midterm and final exam plus short written responses to works every week. Final grade dependent on papers, exams and class participation.
TEXTS: Works by Alice Walker (The Color Purple), Ellison, Wright, Baldwin, Morrison and others.
ADDITIONAL COMENTS: Open to all majors and honor students. This course is cross-listed as ALS 250 (Africana-Latino Studies)
PREREQUISITES: SoS; COMP 100 or ALS 100
TTh 11:30am-12:45pm– CHOONOO

ALIT 351-01: LITERATURE OF THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course looks at the glorious outburst of literature by African Americans during the decade of the 1920s. This period, known as the Harlem Renaissance, stands out in literary history as one of the most significant developments in American literature. The course surveys the works of the most important African American writers of the Renaissance: Jean Toomer, Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, Alan Locke, Jessie Fauset, Zora Neale Hurston, et al.
FORMAT: Two essay exams and a paper are required.
TEXTS: Hughes, Selected Poems of Langston Hughes (Vintage, 1974); Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God (Harper & Row, 1990); Johnson, Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man (Vintage, 1989); Larsen, Passing (Penguin, 1997); Lewis, Poetry Harlem Renaissance Reader (Penguin 1997); Lewis, When Harlem Was in Vogue (Penguin, 1994); Toomer, Cane (Norton, 1988), A course package is required.
NOTE: This course is cross-listed as ALS 351.
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100 or ALS 100; LITR 250 or ALS 273; or permission of instructor.
TTh 4-5:15pm—CHOONOO

ALIT 374-01: HAWTHORNE AND MELVILLE (LA, AH2)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course will consider the work of Nathaniel Hawthorne and Herman Melville, two of the key figures associated with the 19th century's "American Renaissance" Close Study will be devoted to the major novels and short stories of the authors.
FORMAT: Midterm, final, and research paper.
TEXTS: Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter and The House of the Seven Gables, and Melivlle's Typee, Moby-Dick, and Billy Budd; miscellaneous shorter texts.
PREREQUISITES: JrS and 6 s.h. humanities
MWF 11-11:50am - PAYNE

ALIT 394-01: SpTP: THOMAS WOLFE (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course focuses on the writings of Thomas Wolfe, an American modernist and novelist and short story writer of the early twentieth century. The course will situate Wolfe within his historic moment and examine within his oeuvre representative literary traditions and techniques of the period. In addition to his fiction, we will read a play, a biography, and a substantial body of criticism. FORMAT: Will include lecture, discussion, directed writing (including a major research project), and in-class examination
TEXT: TBD
PREREQUISITES: COMP 200 or COMP 290; LITR 150
TTh 1-2:15pm– HOVIS

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

COMP 150-01: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING (LA, WS2)

COURSE SUMMARY: Workshop in imaginative writing (poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction). Open to all students. May be repeated for up to six s.h. credits.
FORMAT: Reading and discussion, in-class and take-home writing, peer workshops, private conferences.
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100.
TTh 4-5:15pm – TULLY

COMP 150-02: INTRODCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING (LA, WS2)

COURSE SUMMARY: This workshop is for students interested in creative writing and will include units in short fiction, poetry, and screenplays. Students can expect to write some pieces in response to specific writing exercises while other pieces will be entirely discretionary. Each student will create a portfolio that will include five to ten revised, polished submissions. Although the primary focus of the class will be o issues specifically related to creative writing, students should have already mastered technical aspects of writing prior to taking this class.
FORMAT: Workshop with lectures, class discussions, and individual conferences. To facilitate the discussion of work submitted for this class, work will be submitted on Angel. Because of the workshop format of this class, students should be prepared to read and discuss their own work and that of their fellow students openly, honestly, and without rancor.
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
MWF 3-3:50pm - PAYNE

COMP 150-81: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING (LA, WS2)

COURSE SUMMARY: Workshop in imaginative writing (poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction). Open to all students. May be repeated for up to six s.h. credits.
FORMAT: Reading and discussion, in-class and take-home writing, peer workshops, private conferences.
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100.
M 5:00 – 6:15pm - FORD

COMP 150-82: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING (LA, WS2)

COURSE SUMMARY: Workshop in imaginative writing (poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction). Open to all students. May be repeated for up to six s.h. credits.
FORMAT: Reading and discussion, in-class and take-home writing, peer workshops, private conferences.
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100.
W 5:00 – 6:15pm - FORD

COMP 200-01: ADVANCED COMPOSITION (LA,WS2)

COURSE DESCRIPTION: In this section of COMP200, we will divide our time equally between smaller and larger editing projects. We will begin the term with a study of the logic and stylistics of sentences, explore some exercises in vocabulary enhancement, and then move on to consider the logic and presentation of larger arguments in paragraphs and full essay forms. To develop the students' skills in analyzing and writing about visual texts, we will be reading two graphic novels, which will be the subject of several writing exercises in this class. This hybrid class will require frequent on-line exercises which will replace our Friday class meetings, so that we will meet in class only on Mondays and Wednesdays.
FORMAT: Lecture, discussion and in-class exercises. Library Research Preparation Exercise, 5%; Grammar Exercises (6): 25%; Writing Exercises (6): 25%; Quizzes (6): 25%; Midterm Examination (1): 10%; Final Examination (1): 10%.
TEXTS: Required texts: John Langan and Beth Johnson, English Essentials, 1st edition (New York: McGraw Hill, 2005), ISBN 0-07-304326-5; Michael Harvey, The Nuts and Bolts of College Writing (Indianapolis: Hackett, 2003), ISBN 0-87220-573-8; Alan Moore, Dave Gibbons and John Higgins, Watchmen (New York: DC Comics, 1995), ISBN 978-0-930289-23-2; Art Spiegelman, Maus: A Survivor's Tale (New York: Pantheon, 1986), ISBN 0-394-74723-2. Recommended Texts: A good college dictionary of student's choice (e.g., Webster=s Collegiate); A good thesaurus of student's choice (e.g., Roget=s).
PREQUISITES: COMP 100 or equivalent and passing grade on CWE.
MWF 12-12:50pm– CRANE

COMP 200-02: ADVANCED COMPOSITION (LA, WS2)

COURSE SUMMARY: Emphasizes advanced work in organization, style, and various rhetorical devices in expository writing. May be repeated for up to 6 s.h. credit.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: McGraw-Hill Reader, 10th ed., Joyce, Dubliners, Viking Critical Library, eds. Scholes & Litz; Strunk and White, Elements of Style, 4th Edition
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
TTh 4-5:15pm— MEANOR

COMP 200 – 81: ADVANCED COMPOSITION (LA, WS2)

COURSE SUMMARY: This class focuses on argumentative writing and style. You will practice defending high-stakes theses in a variety of forms and styles, such the satirical essay and the autoethnographic essay. In addition, this class will stress critical reading and discussion.
FORMAT: Discussion
TEXT: Ways of Reading: An Anthology for Writers
PREREQUISITE: COMP 100
MW 5-6:15pm – TREDENNICK

COMP 260-81:POETRY WORKSHOP (LA, WS2)

COURSE SUMMARY: This class is designed to provide a space where students can dedicate themselves to developing both their writing and their understanding of poetry. Our purpose is to create situations (rhetorical, logistical, psychological, intellectual) in which we can create poetry and learn to discern what works in our own writing and in others'. The course will have two primary components: composition and critique. On the composition end, we will focus on generating poems, grasping hold of the formal aspects of poetry, and widening our perspectives the varieties of poetry written today. To this end, class time will be spent discussing a wide range of published works, performing invention exercises, and generating all kinds of in-class writing. On the critique end, we will devote a significant portion each class to discussing and assessing student work. Critique is not simply a matter of deciding if a given poem is good or bad, successful or unsuccessful. It is a means of understanding what effects a writer is trying to accomplish, sharing influences, discussing the purposes of a work, and in every way helping each other produce interesting work. To effectively critique poetry it is necessary to further enhance our understanding of poetry as a genre and a practice. To that end, we will focus on developing a critical understanding of the work of established poets through discussion and research.
Format: In-class writing, discussion/evaluation of student work, field trips. Students will be responsible for a presentation and paper on the work of an individual poet.
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: "B" or higher in COMP 150; or permission of instructor.
A poetry workshop works best when student come to class with a good understanding of poetry, its structures, and its history. While it is not a requirement, students who are not yet familiar with the American poetry canon should consider taking ALIT 210 in addition to this course.
TTh 11:30am-12:45pm - HECHT

COMP 290-01: WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE (LA, WS2)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course teaches students to apply college writing skills to the discipline of literary studies. Students will increase proficiency in writing, researching, organizing, and revising skills in order to write successful papers in upper-division literature courses. Course builds on the skills learned in LITR 100  and is only open to English majors/minors. English concentrates can be signed in to the course, too.
FORMAT: This is primarily a discussion course with occasional lectures and frequent workshops.
TEXTS: TBD.
PREREQUISITE: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150. SoS.
MWF 9-9:50am – MCDERMOTT

COMP 290-02: WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE (LA, WS2)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course teaches students to apply college writing skills to the discipline of literary studies. Students will increase proficiency in writing, researching, organizing, and revising skills in order to write successful papers in upper-division literature courses. Course builds on the skills learned in LITR 100 and is only open to English majors/minors. English concentrates can be signed in to the course, too.
FORMAT: This is primarily a discussion course with occasional lectures and frequent workshops.
TEXTS: TBD.
PREREQUISITE: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150. SoS.
MWF 11-11:50am – MORGAN-ZAYACHEK

COMP 390-01: CAPSTONE IN ENGLISH:

COURSE SUMMARY; Composition 390 is a writing-intensive seminar required for seniors in the English major. A variable topics course, it emphasizes the application of analytical, research, and critical thinking skills. Students will be expected to engage with major critical and theoretical concerns within literary studies and to produce a significant body of analytical writing.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: SrS (or departmental waiver): completion of LITR 150, COMP 200 or COMP 290, and LITR 250
TTh 2:30-3:45pm - HOVIS


COMP 394-01: SPTP: ADVANCED PROF. & TECH. WRITING

COURSE SUMMARY: This class focuses on theories of professional writing and the impact of social media on workplace writing. In the third and final unit of the course, students will work together to create a fictional non-profit organization and to create a mission statement, website, social media presence, and grant proposal for their organization.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: Peeples, Professional Writing and Rhetoric: Readings from the Field, Bowdon & Scott, Service-Learning in Technical and Professional Communication, Wysocki & Johnson-Eilola, Writing New Media: Theory and Applications
PREREQUISITES: COMP 239, BUS 240, or ENVS 320; or equivalent course; or permission of instructor
MWF 2-2:50pm - BLACK

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

ELIT 200–01: BEGINNINGS TO EARLY RENAISSANCE (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: Students successfully completing this section of ELIT200 will have surveyed the overall shape of the early history of English literature. Their grasp of this schematic framework will aid them in contextualizing literary texts in terms of cultural, geographic, and intellectual history. They will also have developed their vocabulary, critical thinking, and information management skills. This hybrid class will require frequent on-line exercises which will replace our Friday class meetings, so that we will meet in class only on Mondays and Wednesdays.
FORMAT: Lecture and Discussion. Grading Weights: 2% Practice Exercises (2); 43%Quizzes (5); 10%Vocabulary Exercises (5); 15% Reading Comprehension Exercises (5); 15% Midterm Examination; 15% Final Examination.
TEXTS: Christopher Baswell and Anne Howland Schotter, eds., The Longman Anthology of British Literature, Vol. 1A: The Middle Ages (New York, Pearson Longman, 2010), 4th edition, paperback, ISBN 978-0-205-65530-4 , Constance Jordan and Clare Carroll, eds., The Longman Anthology of British Literature, Vol. 1B: The Early Modern Period (New York, Pearson Longman, 2006), 4th edition, paperback, ISBN 978-0-205-65532-8
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100.
MWF 3-3:50pm - CRANE

ELIT 202-01: ENGLISH LITERATURE 18th-CENTURY-PRESENT (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: This class offers a survey of British literature from the Romantic era to the contemporary, seeking to place texts within their historical contexts and to trace the development of themes, forms, and ideas over the centuries covered. Themes covered will include gender, sexuality, sex, violence, the monstrous, etc.
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
FORMAT: Discussion with occasional lectures. The primary coursework will consist of a combination of formal papers and at least one exam.
TEXTS: Novels will include Frankenstein and Dracula. Poets covered will range from William Blake to Carol Ann Duffy.
MWF 2-2:50pm - TREDENNICK

ELIT 241-01: THE ENGLISH RENAISSANCE

COURSE SUMMARY: This course is designed for students who want to explore the rich tapestry of literary, political, and cultural texts throughout the English Renaissance (roughly 15th –17th centuries). Our primary areas of focus will be Poetry & Politics; Queen Elizabeth & the Cult of Love; and the Stage & Social Change. Readings will include poetry, prose, drama.
FORMAT: Classes will be a combination of discussion and lecture. Class participation crucial; weekly writing assignments and/or discussion questions; oral presentation; midterm and final exam; 7-10 page paper.
TEXTS: The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Volume B: The Sixteenth Century/The Early Seventeenth Century ISBN-10: 0393927180; The Roaring Girl, Norton Critical Edition, (by Thomas Middleton) ISBN-10:0393932775
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100, LITR 100 or LITR 150; or permission of the instructor.
MWF 12-12:50pm– FININ

ELIT 243-01: EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE (LA, AH2)

COURSE SUMMARY: We will read eighteenth-century novels, essays, satirical prose, journalism, drama, and poetry. There will be a focus on the shifting nature of the novel, with particular attention to the relationship between genre and gender. We will also examine the changing cultural ideas that produced developments in poetry, art, science, and enlightenment philosophy.
FORMAT: Discussion and lecture.
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150.
MWF 3-3:50pm - SADOW

ELIT 270-01: SHAKESPEARE (LA, AH2)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course focuses on a wide range of Shakespeare's work and traces the development of his career from the 1590s through 1612. Increasing your understanding and enjoyment of Shakespeare's plays and poems will be our primary goal. In addition to careful reading of these texts, we will consider their historical, biographical and cultural contexts. Toward that end, we will discuss Renaissance notions of love, friendship and family; the politics of poetry and court culture; and the impact of emerging "New World" discoveries on Shakespeare's drama.
FORMAT: Combination of lectures & discussion; class attendance crucial; frequent writing assignments and quizzes, 2 essay exams, plus midterm and final exams.
TEXTS: The Norton Shakespeare: Essential Plays / The Sonnets. Ed. Stephen Greenblatt. Norton, 2008. ISBN-13: 978-0-393-93313-0
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
MWF 1-1:50pm - FININ

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

LING 210-01: TRADITIONAL GRAMMAR: ENGLISH (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: Students will examine the grammar of English from a sentence structure perspective. Beginning with sentence patterns, they will progress to parts of sentences and how the sentences are constructed to make meaning. They will also discuss the relationship of grammar to mechanics in writing.
FORMAT: In-class discussions and exercises, as well as some lecture. The primary evaluation will be through several exams.
TEXT: Packet of materials
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; SoS
MWF 8-8:50AM - DOUGHTY

LING 210-02: TRADITIONAL GRAMMAR: ENGLISH (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: Students will examine the grammar of English from a sentence structure perspective. Beginning with sentence patterns, they will progress to parts of sentences and how the sentences are constructed to make meaning. They will also discuss the relationship of grammar to mechanics in writing.
FORMAT: In-class discussions and exercises, as well as some lecture. The primary evaluation will be through several exams.
TEXT: Packet of materials
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; SoS
MWF 9-9:50 - DOUGHTY

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

LITR 150-01       INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY SUDIES   (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: Designed for those who are or wish to be English majors, this course provides a foundation for further study. LITR 150 students ideally become proficient at performing close readings of primary texts, but they also strengthen their understandings of both the English major and scholarly aspects of literature.  Specific goals for this course include gaining familiarity with the vocabulary, forms, and elements of the three major textual genres (fiction, poetry, drama); understanding periodization, and contextualizing texts according to literary and cultural traditions; developing fluency with the vocabulary of literary analysis; developing research and writing skills specific to literary studies; and learning discipline-specific formatting and citation conventions. The class will begin with a brief unit focused  on the author of SUNY-Oneonta’s Common Read.
FORMAT: Primarily discussion, with occasional mini-lectures and peer-review/ workshopping of student writing. Students will be asked to choose 1-2 works from the textbook and to help begin class discussions of them. In addition, students will write two or three papers, post a weekly reading response to Angel, and take three unit tests.
TEXTS: Kirszner & Mandell, Literature: Reading, Reacting, Writing; the Common Read text (TBA) and 1-2 shorter works by the same author.
PREREQUISITES: Declared English major or permission of the department.
MWF 12-12:50PM - BLACK   


LITR 150-03: INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDIES (LA)


COURSE SUMMARY: Introduction to Literary Studies is designed for those who are or wish to be English majors. It provides a foundation for the contexts, concepts, and methods relevant to the study of literature. Course coverage will include instruction in the use of relevant terminology and concepts, familiarity with literary and historical periods, and an overview of literary and genre conventions. The course should be taken within one year of declaring the major.
FORMAT: Lecture/ discussion. Midterm, final, two in-class writing assignments, research project.
TEXTS: Literature: Reading, Reacting, Writing (Compact Sixth Edition)— Kirszner & Mandel; A Glossary of Literary Terms—M.H. Abrams; Billy Budd—Herman Melville
PREREQUISITES: Declared English major, or by permission of the department.
MWF 1-10:50am- PAYNE

LITR 220-01: SHORT FICTION (LA, AH2)


COURSE SUMMARY: Appreciation and understanding of form and meaning in fiction through reading and analysis of selected works. We will be reading the stories in chronological order, after achieving a basic grounding in short-story history and theory (i.e., the instructor's essay on "The American Short Story" in the Encyclopedia of American Literature, which will be distributed in class).
FORMAT: We shall be using a number of handouts by Mann, March, Forster, etc. We shall be reading the stories in The Norton Anthology chronologically, and will be getting a basic grounding in the history and theory of the American short story in Patrick Meanor's essay on "The Short Story," in the Encyclopedia of American Literature, editor, Steven Serafin, Continuum Press, 1999. (a handout). There will be two essay examinations and a final paper of 6 to 8 pages in length. There will be a reading quiz every class. Each essay examination (open book) will count 30%, the paper 25% and the quizzes 15%. You may not make up any quiz without a medical excuse. The student must meet with the teacher or the TA to determine the content of the paper.
TEXTS: The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction: Shorter: 7th Edition. Eds, R.V. Cassill and Richard Baush; The Stories of John Cheever, Random House; Joyce, Dubliners, Viking Critical Library, eds. Scholes and Litz
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
TTh 2:30-3:45pm - MEANOR

LITR 250-01: CRITICAL APPROACHES TO LITERATURE (LA, AH2)

COURSE SUMMARY: Exploration of the various approaches and techniques used in understanding and judging literary works; includes the reading of representative literary works, written criticism, critical theory, and practice in literary criticism.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 150; 3 s.h. 200-level ALIT, ELIT, LITR or WLIT.
MWF 2-2:50PM – SADOW

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

WLIT 202-01  WORLD LITERATURE – 18TH CENTURY TO THE PRESENT (LA, HO2)

COURSE SUMMARY: A study of selected world literary texts from the 18th century to the present. This semester, the class will look in some depth at the literature, history and culture of four non-Western countries: Brazil, Japan, Senegal, and Afghanistan. We will consider issues like imperialism and post-colonialism, modernization, nationalism, and relations (literary and political) with the United States.
FORMAT: Primarily discussion, with occasional mini-lectures and student presentations.  Students will write 2-3 papers and take 4 unit exams.
TEXTS: TBA, but likely to include texts similar to the following: from Brazil: Machado de Assis, Dom Casmurro; Jorge Amado, Dona Flor and her Two Husbands; Clarice Lispector, Family Ties; Japan: stories by Ryunosuke and Mishima; the film Rashomon;  Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle; Senegal: poems by Senghor, Ba, So Long a Letter; Afghanistan: Kipling, Kim; Hosseini, The Kite Runner; and recent work on Afghan women’s writing. Additional and alternative suggestions are welcome.
PREREQUISITE: COMP 100
MWF 10-10:50am—BLACK

WLIT 227-01: SEX AND GENDER IN GREEK LITERATURE (LA, AH2)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course explores gender in ancient Greek literature by examining the roles of men and women in Greek society, how the Greeks defined the categories of male and female, and how concepts of masculinity and femininity shaped Greek literature, mythology, and daily life.
FORMAT:TBA
TEXT: TBA
PREREQUISITE: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150.|
TTh 11:30am-12:45pm – YATSUHASHI

WLIT 394-01: SpTP: FEMALE VOICE – FRENCH LITERATURE (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course is designed to familiarize students with the female voice in French literature and society through the ages. Students will explore the various challenges raised by the issues of gender, literary merit, values and philosophy in the contributions of women in French literature. They will also learn how to assess feminist anti-feminist, and ambivalent attitudes in treatments of female characters and feminist concerns. Finally, they will study French feminist criticism in the discussion of women's feminist philosophy and literature in the twentieth century, from Marie de France to Marquerite Duras.
FORMAT: Class discussions, readings, and papers will be in English.
TEXTS: A reader will be created for the course.
PREREQUISITES: One of the following: FREN 208 or 209 or COMP 200 or 290 or WMST 130
TTh 23:30-3:45pm – Tsan

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT