Department of English

English Department Course Offerings Fall 2013

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

ALIT 200-01 AMERICAN LITERATURE TO 1865 (LA, AH2)
COURSE SUMMARY: We will survey the literature produced in America until the end of the Civil War, including work produced by Native Americans, the Puritans, and representatives of the Age of Enlightenment, the American Renaissance, and the early period of American Realism. Genres will include poetry, fiction, essays, and autobiography.
FORMAT: Lecture and discussion. Frequent quizzes and three exams. Regular attendance and class participation are expected.
TEXTS: The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Pkg. 1 (Vols. A & B): Lit to 1865 (SIXTH Edition)(New York, W.W. Norton, 2002) ISBN: 0-393-97793-5 General Editor, Nina Baym
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
MWF 12-12:50pm - HECHT

ALIT 201-01 AMERICAN LITERATURE, 1865 -- PRESENT (LA, AH2)
COURSE SUMMARY: Survey of major writers of America from the Civil War to the present. Readings include novels, short stories, poetry, drama, and nonfiction—by writers such as Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, Edith Wharton, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, Robert Frost, T.S. Eliot, and Tony Kushner. The course covers—in broad strokes—some of the major literary and cultural movements from the last century and a half, with an emphasis upon close reading of representative texts.
FORMAT: Reading and discussion, lecture, quizzes, exams, directed writing. 

TEXTS: Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Dover, 1994), ISBN: 0-486-28061-6
Mark Twain, Humorous Stories and Sketches (Dover, 1996), ISBN: 0-486-29279-7, Edith Wharton, Short Stories (Dover, 1994), ISBN: 0-486-28235-X, Oscar Williams and Edwin Honig, eds., The Mentor Book of Major American Poets(Mentor, 1962), ISBN: 0-451-62791-1, Tony Kushner, Angels in America (TCG, 2003), ISBN: 1-55936-231-6, Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
MWF 1:00-1:50 pm - HOVIS

ALIT 225-01 MODERN AMERICAN DRAMA (LA, AH2)
COURSE SUMMARY: This course investigates the evolution of the American drama tradition over the past century. Students will ideally learn both the history and socio-political significance of particularly influential plays, and gain appreciation of the playwrights who have made the greatest impact on American society. As this is primarily a reading course, students do not need theater experience. I will, however, encourage and reward active participation in class. Indeed, the class will rely primarily on analytical discussions with some spot lecturing. FORMAT: Students will be required to complete scheduled quizzes, a mid term and final, and to submit two essays of moderate length (3-5 and 6-8 pages, respectively) by the deadline indicated on the syllabus.TEXTS: Kushner, Tony. Angels in America, part 1 & 2: Millennium Approaches & Perestroika. (1995) ISBN: 1-55936-061-5 & 1-55936-073-9. Richardson, Gary A. and Stephen Watt. American Drama: Colonial to Contemporary. (1995) ISBN: 0-15-500003-9
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100 & LITR 100 or LITR 150
TTh 10-11:15am – MORGAN-ZAYACHEK

ALIT 280-01 JACK LONDON (LA)
COURSE SUMMARY: This course focuses on a well-known American author. London’s life is an essential part of his literary work—in fiction, non-fiction and journalism—and the course will contextualize London within the turbulent period from 1880 to WWI. Readings of primary texts and secondary sources will provide material for class discussions.
FORMAT: This is a lecture and discussion course, with the emphasis firmly on the latter. Two papers, quizzes (as necessary), a Reading Journal—with assigned and self-initiated entries—and individual facilitations of class material will form the basis for the final grade. Most of the supplementary course materials for this term will be available to you on Angel or on Reserve in the Milne Library.
TEXTS: Jack London. Martin Eden. Penguin, 1994. ISBN: 0140187723; The Star Rover. Prometheus, 1999. ISBN: 1573926957; The Sea Wolf & Other Stories. NAL/Signet, 2004. ISBN: 0451529367; John Barleycorn. Mod. Lib. Coll. Ed., 2001. ISBN: 0375757029; The Assassination Bureau. Penguin, 1994. ISBN: 0140186778; Fantastic Tales. U. Nebraska Press, 2002. ISBN: 0803279795;
PREREQUISITES: SoS
MWF 1-1:50pm – LEE

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

COMP 200-01 ADVANCED COMPOSITION (LA, WS2)
COURSE SUMMARY: Emphasizes advanced work in organization, style, and various rhetorical devices in expository writing. May be repeated for up to 6 s.h. credit.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXT: TBA
PREREQUISITE: COMP 100
TTh 2:30-3:45pm - MAHONEY

COMP 200-02 ADVANCED COMPOSITION (LA, WS2)
COURSE SUMMARY: Emphasizes advanced work in organization, style, and various rhetorical devices in expository writing. May be repeated for up to 6 s.h. credit.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXT: TBA
PREREQUISITE: COMP 100
TTh 4-5:15pm - MAHONEY

COMP 200-04 ADVANCED COMPOSITION (LA, WS2)
COURSE SUMMARY: Emphasizes advanced work in organization, style, and various rhetorical devices in expository writing. May be repeated for up to 6 s.h. credit.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: McGraw-Hill Reader, 10th ed., Joyce, Dubliners, Viking Critical Library, eds. Scholes & Litz; Strunk and White, Elements of Style, 4th Edition
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
TTh 2:30-3:45pm— MEANOR

COMP 200-05 ADVANCED COMPOSITION (LA, WS2)
COURSE SUMMARY: Extending the foundations of COMP 100, students can expect to focus on both general writing issues and their individual needs. This section of the course is organized around rhetorical strategies such as argumentation and analysis, but also focuses upon the proper role and use of outside source materials. Assignments will be grounded in readings of essays and will allow for creative topic development.
FORMAT: Students will be required to compose and revise at least six essays and to participate in in-class writing activities and peer evaluations.
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100 or equivalent and successful completion of the CWE.
TTh 8:30-9:45 m - RICE

COMP 270-81 FICTION WORKSHOP (LA, WS2)
COURSE SUMMARY: Students will learn the fundamentals of fiction writing and will apply them to the production of their own stories and, in workshop, to a discussion of work by other students in the course. Readings will include stories from an anthology, essays from a book on craft, and stories produced by other students in the class. In this course we will “read as writers,” paying particular attention to the technical aspects of story writing—such as structure, plotting, character development, point of view, writing dialogue, and creating scenes. An emphasis will be placed on investigating students’ own lived experiences as sources of fiction. May be repeated for up to 6 s.h. credit.
FORMAT: Workshop, discussion, and spot lecturing. The course requires the writing and revision of short fiction, and writing exercises to be completed in class and outside of class. The course also includes quizzes and examination as necessary.
TEXTS:The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction: 50 North American Stories Since 1970 (Touchstone Books, 2007) ISBN-10: 1416532277 / ISBN-13: 978-1416532279
--Making Shapely Fiction, Jerome Stern (Norton, 1991).
PREREQUISITES: “B” in COMP 150 or permission of instructor
W 5:30-8pm – HOVIS

COMP 290-01 WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE (LA, WS2)
COURSE SUMMARY: This course teaches students to apply college writing skills to the discipline of literary studies. Students will increase proficiency in writing, researching, organizing, and revising skills in order to write successful papers in upper-division literature courses. Course builds on the skills learned in LITR 100 or LITR 150 and is only open to English majors/minors. Should be taken in the sophomore year.
FORMAT: This is primarily a discussion course with frequent writing workshops. Weekly informal writing assignments, both in and outside of class, 4-5 papers.
TEXTS: Forster, E. M. Howards End. Ed. Alistair M. Duckworth. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 1997. ISBN-10: 0-312-11182-7; Griffith, Kelley. Writing Essays About Literature. 8th edition. Boston: Wadsworth, 2011. ISBN: 1- 4282-9041-9; others TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100 and LITR 100 or LITR 150; SoS
TTh 10-11:15am – FININ

COMP 290-02 WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE (LA, WS2)
COURSE SUMMARY: This course teaches students to apply college writing skills to the discipline of literary studies. Students will increase proficiency in writing, researching, organizing, and revising skills in order to write successful papers in upper-division literature courses. Course builds on the skills learned in LITR 100 or LITR 150 and is only open to English majors/minors. Should be taken in the sophomore year. (LA, WS2)
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100 and LITR 100 or LITR 150; SoS
MWF 1-1:50pm - YATSUHASHI

COMP 390-01 THE HAUNTED HOUSE IN LITERATURE
COURSE SUMMARY: This course will focus on literature which features haunted houses or other such structures. We will seek to explore what haunted houses meant for different literary periods, what ideological work such narratives perform, and why the genre continues to be so popular.
FORMAT: Discussion with occasional lecture and/or séance
TEXTS: May include such texts as: Stephen King’s The Shining, Toni Morrison’s Beloved, various Poe stories, Henry James’s “The Turn of the Screw” and “The Jolly Corner,” Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House, Joyce Carol Oates’s “Haunted,” Sarah Waters’s Affinity, Oscar Wilde’s “The Canterville Ghost,” etc.
PREREQUISITES: SrS; completion of LITR 150, COMP 200 or COMP 290, and LITR 250
TTh 1-2:15pm - TREDENNICK

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT


ELIT 200–01 ENGLISH LITERATURE–BEGINNINGS TO EARLY RENAISSANCE (LA)
COURSE SUMMARY: This course is offered as a “blended” course, combining in-class meetings (Mondays and Wednesdays) with on-line exercises on Fridays, when we will not be meeting in the classroom. Students successfully completing this section of ELIT200 will have surveyed the overall shape of the early history of English literature. Their grasp of this schematic framework will aid them in contextualizing the representative works read this term in terms of cultural, geographic, and intellectual history. They will also have developed their vocabulary, critical thinking, and information management skills.
FORMAT: Lecture and Discussion. Grading Weights: 2% Practice Exercises (2); 43%Quizzes (5); 10%Vocabulary Exercises (5); 15% Reading Comprehension Exercises (5); 15%Midterm Examination; 15% Final Examination.
TEXTS: Christopher Baswell and Anne Howland Schotter, eds., The Longman Anthology of British Literature, Vol. 1A: The Middle Ages (New York, Pearson Longman, 2010), 4th edition, paperback, ISBN 978-0-205-65530-4 , Constance Jordan and Clare Carroll, eds., The Longman Anthology of British Literature, Vol. 1B: The Early Modern Period (New York, Pearson Longman, 2006), 4th edition, paperback, ISBN 978-0-205-65532-8
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100.
MWF 2-2:50pm - CRANE

ELIT 246-01 VICTORIAN LITERATURE (LA, AH2)
COURSE SUMMARY: Great works of British prose and poetry from 1832 to 1901. The Victorians were wonderfully twisted. Therefore, we will read texts involving necrophiliac lovers, insane witchy women, and goblins whose evil spells are cured by homoeroticism. In addition we will read what is, quite possibly, the coolest novel ever written, Bram Stoker’s Dracula.
FORMAT: This is primarily a discussion course with occasional lectures. There will be at least two thesis-driven papers, frequent reading quizzes, etc.
TEXTS: Stoker, Bram. Dracula; Dickens, Charles, Great Expectations, and Norton Anthology of British Literature: The Victorian Age.
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LIT 100 or LIT 150.
TTh 4-5:15pm – TREDENNICK

ELIT 270-01 SHAKESPEARE (LA, AH2)
COURSE SUMMARY: This course is offered as a “blended” course, combining in-class meetings (Mondays and Wednesdays) with on-line exercises on Fridays, when we will not be meeting in the classroom. The course will provide students with an overarching view of Shakespeare’s poetry and plays, beginning with an exploration of his sonnets and continuing with readings in the dramatic genres of comedy, history, tragedy and romance. We will be concerned this term not only with Shakespeare’s unique genius, but also with understanding the cultural forces (political, religious, and economic) shaping Shakespeare’s world-view, language and literary techniques. Frequent in-class screenings of individual scenes from Shakespeare’s plays will introduce students to the rich variety of stage and film interpretations of the texts. Online reading- comprehension and vocabulary exercises will develop the students reading and language skills, familiarize the students with the conventions and vocabulary of Shakespeare criticism, and, most importantly, help students to develop their own interpretations of Shakespeare’s oeuvre as they become more familiar with the cultural and/or biographical contexts of the assigned readings.
FORMAT: Lecture and discussion. Grading Weights: 2% Practice Exercise; 23% Quizzes (6); 15% Reading-Comprehension Exercises (5); 15%Vocabulary Exercises (6); 10% Poetics Exercises (3); 15% Midterm Examination; 20% Final Examination.
TEXTS: William Shakespeare, The Sonnets and Narrative Poems: The Complete Non-Dramatic Poetry, ed. William Burto (NY: Signet), ISBN 0-451-52314; Midsummer Night's Dream, ed. David Bevington (NY: Bantam), ISBN 0-55321300-8; Henry IV, Part One, ed. David Bevington (NY: Bantam), ISBN 0-553-21293-1; Merchant of Venice, ed. David Bevington (NY: Bantam), ISBN 0-553-21299-0; King Lear, ed. David Bevington (NY: Bantam) ISBN 0-553-21297-4; The Tempest, ed. David Bevington (NY: Bantam) ISBN 0-553-21307-5.
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
MWF 3-3:50pm – CRANE

ELIT 270-02 SHAKESPEARE (LA, AH2)
COURSE SUMMARY: This course focuses on a wide range of Shakespeare’s work and traces the development of his career from the 1590s through 1612. Increasing your understanding and enjoyment of Shakespeare’s plays and poems will be our primary goal. In addition to careful reading of these texts, we will consider their historical, biographical and cultural contexts. Toward that end, we will discuss Renaissance notions of love, friendship and family; the politics of poetry and court culture; and the impact of emerging “New World” discoveries on Shakespeare’s drama.
FORMAT: Combination of lectures & discussion; class attendance crucial; frequent writing assignments and quizzes, midterm, and final exam.
TEXTS: The Norton Shakespeare: Essential Plays / The Sonnets. Ed. Stephen Greenblatt. Norton, 2008. ISBN-13: 978-0-393-93313-0
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
TTh 1-2:15pm - FININ

ELIT 287-01 FROM ROMANCE TO GOTHIC (LA)
COURSE SUMMARY: The novel has always been closely tied to ideas about women, and this class will trace the history of a genre with a focus on gender. The seventeenth and eighteenth centuries saw the novel as either a teaching method or a dangerous distraction for women and young people, and we will examine the ways women writers navigated scandal and respectability in the romances of authors like Aphra Behn, in the sentimental and comic novel, and works of gothic terror by novelists like Ann Radcliffe. At the same time, we will look at the social, economic, and cultural conditions surrounding publishing, women's rights, and marriage through essays and journalism by writers such as Mary Astell, Eliza Haywood, and Mary Wollstonecraft.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: LITR 100 or LITR 150, or permission of instructor
TTH 11:30am-12:45pm - SADOW

ELIT 294-01 SpTp: WILLIAM BLAKE & THE ROMANTICS (LA)
COURSE SUMMARY: One of the most imaginative artists of the English Romantic Period, William Blake (1757-1827) was a poet, painter, and printmaker. His illuminated poems and complex mythologies are striking testaments to the sheer force of his originality in an age when Imagination reigned supreme. We will survey Blake's composite work chronologically and locate the poet in the historical and social context of the 19th century. An exploration of the antecedents of the Romantic era, and its lasting influence into the Modern and Postmodern periods, will broaden that context.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: English Romantic Poetry: An Anthology, Dover, ISBN-10: 0486292827, The Complete Poetry & Prose of William Blake, Ed. Harold Bloom, Anchor, ISBN-10: 0385152132, A Blake Dictionary: The Ideas and Symbols of William Blake, S. Foster Damon Brown UP, ISBN-10: 0874514363, Milton, A Poem (The Illuminated Books of William Blake, Volume 5) Princeton UP, ISBN-10: 0691001480, The Portable Beat Reader, Ed. Ann Charters, Penguin, ISBN-10: 0142437530 Easter 1916" and Other Poems, W. B. Yeats, Dover, ISBN-10: 0486297713
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150; 6 s.h. ALIT, ELIT, LITR or WLIT
MWF 3-3:50pm – FERRARA

ELIT 371-01 SHAKESPEARE AND CULTURE (LA, AH2)
COURSE SUMMARY: This seminar course is designed for students who wish to immerse themselves more fully in reading and analyzing Shakespeare's plays. We will focus on two or three plays, reading them closely and considering how they intersect with a number of contentious issues in both early modern and post modern cultures. We will examine the editorial history of the plays we are reading, along with historical and current critical responses to them. FORMAT: Seminar format; weekly research and writing assignments; student presentations, 12-20 page paper.
REQUIRED TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: LITR 150, COMP 290 or COMP 200, ELIT 270
Th 4:00-6:30 PM - FININ

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT


LING 210-01 TRADITIONAL GRAMMAR: ENGLISH (LA)
COURSE SUMMARY: Students will examine the grammar of English from a sentence structure perspective. Beginning with sentence patterns, they will progress to parts of sentences and how the sentences are constructed to make meaning. They will also discuss the relationship of grammar to mechanics in writing.
FORMAT: In-class discussions and exercises, as well as some lecture. The primary evaluation will be through several exams.
TEXT: Packet of materials
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; SoS
MWF 8-8:50am - DOUGHTY

LING 322: VARIETIES OF AMERICAN ENGLISH (LA)
COURSE SUMMARY: This course will explore the different varieties and dialects of English in the United States, including both regional and cultural variations, from the first English settlements to the present. Coverage will also include the impact of other languages on American English.
FORMAT: A combination of lecture and discussion. Students will complete a project or research essay related to aspects of American English, as well as take several exams.
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITE: LING 201 or JrS.
MWF 11-11:50am - DOUGHTY

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT


LITR 150-01 INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY SUDIES (LA)
COURSE SUMMARY: Designed for those who are or wish to be English majors, this course provides a foundation for further study. LITR 150 students ideally become proficient at performing close readings of primary texts, but they also strengthen their understandings of both the English major and scholarly aspects of literature. Specific goals for this course include gaining familiarity with the vocabulary, forms, and elements of the three major textual genres (fiction, poetry, drama); understanding periodization, and contextualizing texts according to literary and cultural traditions; developing fluency with the vocabulary of literary analysis; developing research and writing skills specific to literary studies; and learning discipline-specific formatting and citation conventions.
FORMAT: Primarily discussion, with occasional mini-lectures and peer-review/ workshopping of student writing. Students will be asked to choose 1-2 works from the textbook and to help begin class discussions of them. In addition, students will write two or three papers, post a weekly reading response to Angel, and take three unit tests.
TEXTS: Kirszner & Mandell, Literature: Reading, Reacting, Writing and one novel (TBA but possibly Forster, A Passage to India)
PREREQUISITES: Declared English major or permission of the department.
TTh 10-11:15am - BLACK

LITR 150-02 INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDIES (LA)
COURSE SUMMARY: Introduction to Literary Studies is designed for those who are or wish to be English majors. It provides a foundation for the contexts, concepts, and methods relevant to the study of literature. Course coverage will include instruction in the use of relevant terminology and concepts, familiarization with literary and historical periods, and an overview of literary and genre conventions. The course should be taken within one year of declaring the major.
FORMAT: A mixture of lecture and discussion. Frequent quizzes, an in-class exam, one short paper, one long research-informed paper, and a final exam.
TEXTS: Kirszner and Mandell, Literature: Reading, Reacting, Writing. Compact 6th ed., and other texts to be determined.
PREREQUISITES: Declared English Major; or by permission of the Department.
TTh 11:30am-12:45pm – MORGAN-ZAYACHEK

LITR 150-03 INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDIES (LA)
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduction to Literary Studies is designed for those who are or wish to be English majors. It provides a foundation for the contexts, concepts, and methods relevant to the study of literature. Course coverage will include instruction in the use of relevant terminology and concepts, familiarity with literary and historical periods, and an overview of literary and genre conventions. The course should be taken within one year of declaring the major.
FORMAT: Lecture/ discussion. Midterm, final, two in-class writing assignments, research project.
TEXTS: Literature: Reading, Reacting, Writing (Compact Sixth Edition)— Kirszner & Mandel; A Glossary of Literary Terms—M.H. Abrams;The Island of Doctor Moreau—H.G. Wells
PREREQUISITES: Declared English major, or by permission of the department.
TTh 11:30am-12:45pm- PAYNE

LITR 220-01 SHORT FICTION (LA, AH2)
COURSE SUMMARY: Appreciation and understanding of form and meaning in fiction through reading and analysis of selected works. We will be reading the stories in chronological order, after achieving a basic grounding in short-story history and theory (i.e., the instructor’s essay on “The American Short Story” in the Encyclopedia of American Literature, which will be distributed in class).
FORMAT: We shall be using a number of handouts by Mann, March, Forster, etc. We shall be reading the stories in The Norton Anthology chronologically, and will be getting a basic grounding in the history and theory of the American short story in Patrick Meanor’s essay on “The Short Story,” in the Encyclopedia of American Literature, editor, Steven Serafin, Continuum Press, 1999. (a handout). There will be two essay examinations and a final paper of 6 to 8 pages in length. There will be a reading quiz every class. Each essay examination (open book) will count 30%, the paper 25% and the quizzes 15%. You may not make up any quiz without a medical excuse. The student must meet with the teacher or the TA to determine the content of the paper.
TEXTS: The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction: Shorter: 7th Edition. Eds, R.V. Cassill and Richard Baush; The Stories of John Cheever, Random House; Joyce, Dubliners, Viking Critical Library, eds. Scholes and Litz
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
TTh 4-5:15pm – MEANOR

LITR 250-01 CRITICAL APPROACHES TO LITERATURE (LA, AH2)
COURSE SUMMARY: Exploration of the various approaches and techniques used in understanding and judging literary works; includes the reading of representative literary works, written criticism, critical theory, and practice in literary criticism.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 150; 3 s.h. 200-level ALIT, ELIT, LITR or WLIT.
TTh1-2:15pm – SADOW

LITR 284-01 WRITING THE LAND: LITERATURE OF PLACE (LA, AH2)
COURSE SUMMARY: Explores encounters with the natural world as articulated in creative nonfiction, fiction, essays, and poetry. Emphasis placed on diverse representations of the environment as understood through varied cultural and social perspectives.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: LITR 100 or LITR 150.
TTh 10-11:15am - PAYNE

LITR 345-01(LITR 394) NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE (LA)
COURSE SUMMARY: The study of selected Native American literatures written in English from the 18th century to the present. The course will emphasize the historical and cultural contexts of Native literary history, as well as ongoing concerns with questions of education, identity, language, land, and tribal sovereignty. The course addresses the major debates within the field of Native literary studies while also considering this literature’s complicated relationship to canonical U.S. literature and American popular culture.
FORMAT: Lecture and discussion. Extensive reading and writing assignments, including several formal essays, midterm and final.
TEXTS: Texts will include Sherman Alexie, Flight; Sherman Alexie, Blasphemy; Louise Erdrich, Round House; Thomas King; The Truth About Stories; Stephen Graham Jones, Bleed into Me; Eric Gansworth, A Half-Life of Cardio-Pulmonary Function among others.
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150; 6 s.h. any LITR: or permission of instructor.
MWF 12-12:50pm – BERNARDIN

LITR 350-81 CONTEMPORARY LITERARY THEORY AND PHILOSOPHY (LA)
COURSE SUMMARY: Designed for students preparing for graduate studies in the humanities. Focuses on structuralist and post-structuralist analyses of texts and culture. Overviews of the philosophical foundations and current theoretical considerations of literary formalism, linguistics, and semiotics. Study to include notable figures such as Baudrillard, Husserl, Heidegger, de Saussure, Jakobson, Kristeva, Lévi-Strauss and Barthes, with literary texts by authors such as Calvino, Eco, Coetzee, Kafka, Woolf and Borges. Cross-listed as PHIL 350.
TEXTS: TBA
FORMAT: lecture/discussion, will include an online component
PREREQUISITES: Jr. standing; PHIL 201 or PHIL 213 or LITR 250; or by permission of instructor.
W 5:30-8pm LEE

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT


WLIT 242-01 MUSLIM WOMEN WRITERS (LA, HO2)
COURSE SUMMARY: This class provides an introduction to Islamic teachings on the rights and roles of women and then examines memoirs, fiction and poetry written by Muslim women. A first unit will examine Quranic passages on the role of women, new scholarship on women in early Islam, and more recent interpretations of gender in Islam, including statements and critiques of Islamic feminism. Second, we will read memoirs of life in Turkey, Morocco, Iran, Malaysia, Somalia, and Iraq. Finally, we turn to imaginative writing by women from across the Islamic world.
FORMAT: Primarily discussion with occasional mini-lectures as needed. Assignments will include two midterm tests and a final exam, weekly reading responses, and 2-3 papers.
TEXTS: TBA (Likely texts will include works by Leila Ahmed, Amina Wadud, Fatima Mernissi, Shirin Ebadi, Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Nawal el Saadawi, Hanan Al-Sheikh, Fadwa Tuqan, and Leila Aboulela).
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
TTh 11:30am-12:45pm- BLACK

WLIT 257-01 MODERN BLACK LITERATUR E (LA, HO2)
COURSE SUMMARY: This course examines selected novels by African-American and African writers
since 1945. The major issue we shall be raising has to do with how the works are affected structurally
and thematically by the social and political experiences of their authors.
FORMAT: Students will be expected to complete two quizzes, one essay (of 3-5 pages), a midterm and final
exam (essay format).
TEXTS: Native Son [Restored text] by Richard Wright, Harper, 1993. Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison, Random [2nd],
1995, Go Tell it on the Mountain by James Baldwin, Random, 1952. Selected Poems of Langston Hughes
by Langston Hughes, Random, 1959, The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison, Penguin, 1993.
Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe, Random, 1959.
Nervous Conditions by Tsitsi Dangarembga, PGW, [Rev.] 2001
PREREQUISITE: COMP 100 or ALS 100; SoS
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: This course is cross-listed with ALS 257.
TTh 2:30-3:45pm – CHOONOO

WLIT 270-01 POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURE AND CULTURE: AFRICA (LA, HO2)
COURSE SUMMARY: This course examines postcolonial literature culturally, thematically, and theoretically. Students read writers who have responded to the impact of colonialism in such geographies as Sub-Saharan Africa. We identify the cultural legacies of British imperialism and we locate expressions of resistance.
FORMAT: A midterm and final exam (in essay form); reading responses on each text.
TEXTS: TBA
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: This course is cross-listed with ALS 270
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100 or ALS 100; SoS
TTh 4-5:15PM - CHOONOO

WLIT 280-81 THE CATHOLIC IMAGINATION (LA, AH2)
COURSE SUMMARY: The novels, poems, and stories to be read detail their protagonists’ spiritual journey through the modern demythologized “waste land.” The works concern themselves with how the characters struggle with problems such as guilt, sin, suffering, faith, and death. The works also document how they move toward a belief in a transcendent power outside themselves, the recognition of which becomes the basis of their spiritual lives. Such a surrender offers them the possibility of finding meaning and significance within the materialistic alienation of the 20th century.
TEXTS: Dante, The Inferno, (Ciardi translation); Alice McDermott, Charming Billy; Graham Greene, Brighton Rock; Chersterton, The Man Who Was Thursday (Guest Lecture by Dr. Richard Lee; Evelyn Waugh, Brideshead Revisited; Joyce, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (Viking Critical Edition-no other edition will do); Gerard Manly Hopkins, Selected Poems (Penguin). Handouts will include selections by Robert Kelly, Flannery O’Connor and Francis Thompson.
FORMAT: Two essay examinations (open books and notes permitted), and a 6-8 page paper that the student and instructor will agree upon early in the semester. Excessive absences may result in a lower-than-expected grade.
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100, LITR 100 or LITR 150
M 6-8:30pm - MEANOR

WLIT 294-01 HOMER (LA)
COURSE SUMMARY: A study and close reading of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey. Topics to be discussed include the warrior ethic, heroic friendship, oral vs. literate poetry, the social function of epic and its historicity, myth and epic, and the r.hanging nature of heroism. We will also consider the importance of the Homeric tradition in the ancient and the modern world.
TEXTS: TBA
FORMAT: TBA
MWF 2-2:50pm - YATSUHASHI

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT