Department of English

English Department Course Offerings Fall 2012

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

ALIT 201-01    AMERICAN LITERATURE, 1865 -- PRESENT                                              (LA, AH2)
 
COURSE SUMMARY: Survey of major writers of America from the Civil War to the present.  Readings include novels, short stories, poetry, drama, and nonfiction—by writers such as Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, Stephen Crane, Kate Chopin, Edith Wharton, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, Robert Frost, Wallace Stevens, and Tony Kushner.  The course covers—in broad strokes—some of the major literary and cultural movements from the last century and a half, with an emphasis upon close reading of representative texts.
FORMAT: Reading and discussion, lecture, quizzes, exams, directed writing.
TEXTS:  TBA.
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
TTh 10-11:15AM HOVIS

ALIT 240-01     THE AMERICAN RENAISSANCE                                                           (LA, WS2)
 
COURSE SUMMARY:  The middle decades of the nineteenth century saw an enormous flowering of the arts in the United States.  As the young nation came into its own economically and politically, it found its voice in the emerging cultural centers of New England and New York.  These writers and artists borrowed elements from European Romantic philosophies to create a new literary and artistic language articulating the specific ideals and conflicts of America.  We will look closely at landmark works by major American Renaissance writers, including Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman and Poe.  To understand these writers, it will be necessary to become acquainted with the economic and political concerns — the development of market capitalism, urbanization, women’s rights, slavery – that underlie their works.
FORMAT:  Discussion, small group presentations, mid-term and final exam, and term paper.
TEXTS:  Norton Anthology of American Literature, course reader.  Additional texts will be announced.
PREREQUISITES:  COMP 100; LITR 100, or LITR 150

TTh 2:30-3:45PM - HECHT

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

COMP 150-01   INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING                                                      (LA, WS2)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course is for students who are interested in exploring and exercising their creative abilities in language. Our focus will be on developing a familiarity with the forms and structures of poetry and fiction and in writing within the conventions of those genres. All students will have the opportunity to have their written work work-shopped by their peers and in conference with the instructor. The final project will be a portfolio of your creative work.
FORMAT: Reading and discussion, formal analysis, journal-keeping, in-class writing, peer workshops, and conferences.
TEXTS: TBA.
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
TTh 11:30AM-12:45PM -  HECHT

COMP 150-03 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING                                                        (LA, WS2)

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Workshop in imaginative writing (verse or prose).
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
MW 4-5:30PM – FORD

COMP 150-04   INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING                                              (LA, WS2)

COURSE SUMMARY:  This course provides a foundation in the basic theory and practice of fiction and poetry. By balancing workshops of student writing with discussions and analysis of published work (in contemporary world literature), students will be introduced to a range of models in these two genres that allow opportunities for students to express their own voices. Writing exercises and formal assignments will help students to develop proficiency in the technical aspects of fiction and poetry—such as structure, plot, characterization, point of view, writing dialogue, creating scenes, poetic voice, stanzaic development, rhythm, texture of sound, image and metaphor. Emphasis will also be placed on the creative writing process (including the role of revision in producing well-crafted work).
FORMAT:  Reading and discussion, some lecture, formal analysis, in- and out-of-class writing, peer workshops, and conferences.
TEXTS: The Practice of Creative Writing, Heather Sellers, ISBN# 978-0312436475; The World’s Greatest Short Stories, James Daley, ISBN# 978-0486447162, A Book of Luminous Things: An International Anthology of Poetry, Czeslaw Milosz, ISBN# 978-0156005743
Students should also anticipate the expense of photocopying their writing for workshop.
PREREQUISITES:  COMP 100
TTh 4-5:15PM - FERRARA

COMP 150-81  INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING                                                       (LA, WS2)

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Workshop in imaginative writing (verse or prose).
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: To be announced.
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
MW 5:30-6:45PM – FORD

COMP 200-01     ADVANCED COMPOSITION                                                                                (LA, WS2)

COURSE SUMMARY: Extending the foundations of COMP 100, students can expect to focus on both general writing issues and their individual needs.  This section of the course is organized around rhetorical strategies such as argumentation and analysis, but also focuses upon the proper role and use of outside source materials.  Assignments will be grounded in readings of essays and will allow for creative topic development.
FORMAT: Students will be required to compose and revise at least six essays and to participate in in-class writing activities and peer evaluations.
TEXTS:  TBA.
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100 or equivalent and successful completion of the CWE.
TTH 10-11:15AM – RICE

COMP 200-02     ADVANCED COMPOSITION                                                                                    (LA, WS2)

COURSE SUMMARY: Emphasizes advanced work in organization, style, and various rhetorical devices in expository writing. May be repeated for up to 6 s.h. credit.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS:  McGraw-Hill Reader, 10th ed., Joyce, Dubliners, Viking Critical Library, eds. Scholes & Litz; Strunk and White, Elements of Style, 4th Edition
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
TTh 4-5:15PM— MEANOR

COMP 200-03     ADVANCED COMPOSITION                                                                (LA, WS2)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course extends the foundations established in COMP 100. Students can expect attention to be paid to both general writing issues and their individual needs. This section of the course is organized around rhetorical strategies such as argumentation and analysis, but it also focuses upon the real needs of college writers—such as the proper role and use of outside source materials. Assignments are grounded in common readings of essays on American popular culture and literature: these assignments allow for creative topic development.
FORMAT: This is a Portfolio-Review course: the work of the semester culminates in the submission of a student-driven portfolio that presents the best work of the term; extensive revision of drafts is the norm. The portfolio accounts for 50% of the final grade. Regular individual conferences focused on major-assignment revision will take up the majority of class time after mid-semester. A reading/writing journal, minor assignments, and occasional quizzes make up the remaining 50% of the final grade.
TEXTS:  Troyka, Lynn Quitman and Douglas Hesse. Quick Access Reference for Writers (5rd edition). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2001; Axelrod, Rise B. and Charles R. Cooper. Reading Critically, Writing Well (7th edition). Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s Press, 2002; Graff, Gerald and Cathy Birkenstein. They Say / I Say: the Moves That Matter in Academic Writing. New York: W. W. Norton, 2009 (2006).
PREREQUISITE: COMP 100.
TTh 8:30-9:45AM - LEE

COMP 200-04 ADVANCED COMPOSITION                                                                            (LA,WS2)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  In this section of COMP200, we will divide our time equally between smaller and larger editing projects.  We will begin the term with a study of the logic and stylistics of sentences, explore some exercises in vocabulary enhancement of dictionary usage, and then move on to consider the logic and presentation of larger arguments in paragraphs and full essay forms.  To develop the students’ skills in analyzing and writing about visual texts, we will be reading two graphic novels, which will be the subject of several writing exercises in this class.
FORMAT: Lecture, discussion and in-class exercises.  Library Research Preparation Exercise, 5%; Grammar Exercises (6): 25%; Writing Exercises (6): 25%; Quizzes (6): 25%; Midterm Examination (1): 10%; Final Examination (1): 10%.
TEXTS: Required texts:  John Langan and Beth Johnson, English Essentials, 1st edition(New York: McGraw Hill, 2005), ISBN 0-07-304326-5; Michael Harvey, The Nuts and Bolts of College Writing (Indianapolis: Hackett, 2003), ISBN 0-87220-573-8; Alan Moore, Dave Gibbons and John Higgins, Watchmen (New York: DC Comics, 1995), ISBN 978-0-930289-23-2; Art Spiegelman, Maus: A Survivor’s Tale (New York: Pantheon, 1986), ISBN 0-394-74723-2.  Recommended Texts: A good college dictionary of student’s choice (e.g., Webster's Collegiate); A good thesaurus of student’s choice (e.g., Roget's).
PREQUISITES: COMP 100
MWF 12-12:50PM – CRANE

COMP 270-81      FICTION WORKSHOP                                                                                 (LA, WS2)

COURSE SUMMARY: Students will learn the fundamentals of fiction writing and will apply them to the production of their own stories and, in workshop, to a discussion of work by other students in the course. Readings will include stories from an anthology, essays from a book on craft, and stories produced by other students in the class. In this course we will “read as writers,” paying particular attention to the technical aspects of story writing—such as structure, plotting, character development, point of view, writing dialogue, and creating scenes. An emphasis will be placed on investigating students’ own lived experiences as sources of fiction. May be repeated for up to 6 s.h. credit.
FORMAT: Workshop, discussion, and spot lecturing. The course requires the writing and revision of short fiction, and writing exercises to be completed in class and outside of class. The course also includes quizzes and examination as necessary.
TEXTS: Pep Talks, Warnings, And Screeds: Indispensable Wisdom And Cautionary Advice For Writers by George Singleton (Writers Digest Books, 2008)  ISBN-10: 1582975655  /  ISBN-13: 978-1582975658
The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction: 50 North American Stories Since 1970 (Touchstone Books, 2007)  ISBN-10: 1416532277    /   ISBN-13: 978-1416532279
PREREQUISITES: “B” in COMP 150 or permission of instructor
T 5:30-8PM – HOVIS

COMP 290-01 WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE                                                                   (LA, WS2)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course teaches students to apply college writing skills to the discipline of literary studies.  Students will increase proficiency in writing, researching, organizing, and revising skills in order to write successful papers in upper-division literature courses.  Course builds on the skills learned in LITR 100 or LITR 150 and is open to English majors/minors.  Should be taken in the sophomore year.
FORMAT: Frequent informal writing assignments, both in and outside of class, along with drafting and revision of 4-5 essays, ranging from close readings to source-based papers.
TEXTS: Turn Of The Screw, James, ISBN 0312597061; Beloved W/New Foreword, Morrison, ISBN 1400033411; House Of Mirth, Wharton, ISBN 0393959015; Fried Fish & Flour Biscuits, Mcglennen ISBN 1844718328
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150; SoS
TTh 11:30AM-12:45PM – BERNARDIN

COMP 290-02   WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE                                                                          (LA, WS2)
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course teaches students to apply college writing skills to the discipline of literary studies. Students will increase proficiency in writing, researching, organizing, and revising skills in order to write successful papers in upper-division literature courses. Course builds on the skills learned in LITR 100 or LITR 150 and is only open to English majors/minors. Should be taken in the sophomore year.
FORMAT: This is primarily a discussion course with frequent writing workshops. Weekly informal writing assignments, both in and outside of class, 4-5 papers.
TEXTS:MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. 7th ed. New York: MLA, 2009. ISBN 9781603290241; others TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100 and LITR 100 or LITR 150; SoS.
MWF 9-9:50AM – FININ

COMP 390-01   CAPSTONE IN ENGLISH: ANCIENT TRAGEDIES
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Composition 390 is a writing-intensive seminar required for seniors in the English major. A variable topics course, it emphasizes the application of analytical, research, and critical thinking skills. Students will be expected to engage with major critical and theoretical concerns within literary studies and to produce a significant body of analytical writing.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: SrS (or departmental waiver); completion of LITR 150, COMP 200, and LITR 250.
TTh 1-2:15PM – YATSUHASHI

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

ELIT 200–01   ENGLISH LITERATURE–BEGINNINGS TO EARLY RENAISSANCE     (LA,AH2)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  Students successfully completing this section of ELIT200 will have surveyed the overall shape of the early history of English literature.  Their grasp of this schematic framework will aid them in contextualizing the representative works read this term in terms of cultural, geographic, and intellectual history.  They will also have developed their vocabulary, critical thinking, and information management skills.
FORMAT: Lecture and Discussion.  Grading Weights: Quizzes, 30%; Reading Exercises, 15%; Library Exercises (using online dictionaries), 10%; Midterm Examination, 20%; Final Examination, 25%.
TEXTS: Christopher Baswell and Anne Howland Schotter, eds., The Longman Anthology of British Literature, Vol. 1A: The Middle Ages (New York, Pearson Longman, 2010), 4th edition, paperback, ISBN 978-0-205-65530-4 , Constance Jordan and Clare Carroll, eds., The Longman Anthology of British Literature, Vol. 1B: The Early Modern Period (New York, Pearson Longman, 2006), 4th edition, paperback, ISBN 978-0-205-65532-8
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100.
MWF 3-3:50 - CRANE     

ELIT 201-81   ENGLISH LITERATURE – RENAISSANCE TO 18TH CENTURY            (LA, AH2)

COURSE SUMMARY: We will study the poetry, prose, and drama of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.  We will focus on metaphysical, Commonwealth, Restoration, Augustan, and late eighteenth-century poets; shifting prose genres, including journalism and fiction; and innovations in theater, including the Restoration.  We will also examine associated developments in aesthetics, gender, philosophy, colonialism, and political isssues, including the English Civil War and French Revolution.
FORMAT: Discussion and lecture
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
W 5:30-8PM - SADOW

ELIT 241-01  THE ENGLISH RENAISSANCE                                                                                   (LA)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  This course is designed for students who want to explore the rich tapestry of literary, political, and cultural texts throughout the English Renaissance (roughly 15th –17th centuries).  Our primary areas of focus will be Renaissance Utopias; Queen Elizabeth & the Cult of Love; and the Stage & Social Change.  Readings will include poetry, prose, drama for each unit.
FORMAT:  Classes will be a combination of discussion and lecture.  Class participation crucial; weekly writing assignments and/or discussion questions; oral presentation; midterm and final exam; 7-10 page paper. 
TEXTS:  The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Volume B: The Sixteenth Century/The Early Seventeenth Century ISBN-10: 0393927180; The Roaring Girl, Norton Critical Edition, (by Thomas Middleton) ISBN-10:0393932775
PREREQUISITES:  COMP 100, LITR 100 or LITR 150; or permission of the instructor.
 MWF 12:00-12:50– FININ

ELIT 270-01       SHAKESPEARE                                                                                                        (LA, AH2)

COURSE SUMMARY:  This course focuses on a wide range of Shakespeare’s work and traces the development of his career from the 1590s through 1612.  Increasing your understanding and enjoyment of Shakespeare’s plays and poems will be our primary goal.  In addition to careful reading of these texts, we will consider their historical, biographical and cultural contexts.  Toward that end, we will discuss Renaissance notions of love, friendship and family; the politics of poetry and court culture; and the impact of emerging “New World” discoveries on Shakespeare’s drama.
FORMAT:  Combination of lectures & discussion; class attendance crucial; frequent writing assignments and quizzes, midterm, and final exam.
TEXTS: The Norton Shakespeare: Essential Plays / The Sonnets.  Ed. Stephen Greenblatt.  Norton, 2008. ISBN-13: 978-0-393-93313-0
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
MWF 2-2:50PM - FININ

ELIT 275-01  JANE AUSTEN                                                                                                                        (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: An intensive reading of novels such as Northanger Abbey, Pride and Prejudice, and Emma. Additional, related readings will cover topics such as Austen’s biography, criticism, the history of the novel, and contemporary literary development.
FORMAT: This is primarily a discussion course with occasional lectures. There will be at least two thesis-driven papers, frequent reading quizzes, and a final exam.
TEXTS: Austen, Jane. Emma;   Austen, Jane. Northanger Abbey;   Austen, Jane. Pride and Prejudice; and other selected novels.
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150
MWF 1-1:50PM – TREDENNICK    

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

LING 201-01 LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY                                                                               (LA, AH2)
               
COURSE SUMMARY:
An introduction to sociolinguistics. Study of language variation and the ways people use language in social interaction.
TEXTS: Sociolinguistics, Ronald Wardhaugh (6th ed) ISBN 978-1405186681)
PREREQUISITES: SoS or LING 150.
W 2-4:30pm - PERKINS

LING 210-01   TRADITIONAL GRAMMAR: ENGLISH                                                                      (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: Students will examine the grammar of English from a sentence structure perspective. Beginning with sentence patterns, they will progress to parts of sentences and how the sentences are constructed to make meaning. They will also discuss the relationship of grammar to mechanics in writing.
FORMAT: In-class discussions and exercises, as well as some lecture. Evaluation will be based on two midterm exams, a final exam, and weekly homework assignments.
TEXT: Packet of materials
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
TTh 11:30-12:45PM - BLACK      

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

LITR 150-01    INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDIES                                                   (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: Introduction to Literary Studies is designed for those who are or wish to be English majors. It provides a foundation for the contexts, concepts, and methods relevant to the study of literature. Course coverage will include instruction in the use of relevant terminology and concepts, familiarity with literary and historical periods, and an overview of literary and genre conventions. The course should be taken within one year of declaring the major.
FORMAT: Lecture/ discussion. Midterm, final, two in-class writing assignments, research project.
TEXTS: Literature: Reading, Reacting, Writing (Compact Sixth Edition)— Kirszner & Mandel; A Glossary of Literary Terms—M.H. Abrams; The Island of Doctor Moreau—H.G. Wells
PREREQUISITES: Declared English major, or by permission of the department.
MWF 10-10:50AM- PAYNE

LITR 150-02    INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDIES                                                           (LA)
 
COURSE SUMMARY: Introduction to Literary Studies is designed for those who are or wish to be English majors. It provides a foundation for the contexts, concepts, and methods relevant to the study of literature. Course coverage will include instruction in the use of relevant terminology and concepts, familiarization with literary and historical periods, and an overview of literary and genre conventions.  The course should be taken within one year of declaring the major.
FORMAT:  A mixture of lecture and discussion. Frequent quizzes, an in-class exam, one short paper, one long research-informed paper, and a final exam.
TEXTS: Kirszner and Mandell, Literature: Reading, Reacting, Writing. Compact 6th ed., and other texts to be determined.
PREREQUISITES:  Declared English Major; or by permission of the Department.
 MW 1-2:15PM – MORGAN-ZAYACHEK

LITR 150-03       INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDIES                                                           (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: Designed for those who are or wish to be English majors, this course provides a foundation for further study. LITR 150 students should become proficient at performing close readings of primary texts, but they also strengthen their understandings of both the English major and scholarly aspects of literature.  Specific goals for this course include gaining familiarity with the vocabulary, forms, and elements of the three major textual genres (fiction, drama, and poetry); understanding periodization, and contextualizing texts according to literary and cultural traditions; developing fluency with the vocabulary of literary analysis; developing research and writing skills specific to literary studies; and learning discipline-specific formatting and citation conventions.
FORMAT: Primarily discussion, with occasional mini-lectures and peer-review/ workshopping of student writing. Students will be asked to choose 1-2 works from the textbook and to start off class discussions of them. In addition, students will write two or three papers, post a weekly reading response to Angel, and take three unit tests.
TEXTS: Kirszner & Mandell, Literature: Reading, Reacting, Writing and Fernando Pessoa, Selected Poems.
PREREQUISITES: Declared English major or permission of the department.
TTh 4-5:15PM - BLACK

LITR 220-81  SHORT FICTION                                                                                                             (LA, AH2)

COURSE SUMMARY:  Appreciation and understanding of form and meaning in fiction through reading and analysis of selected works. 
FORMAT:  We will be reading texts that illustrate basic issues in the history and theory of this interesting genre’s development. Students' final grades will be based upon two exams, an interpretive/analytical paper of 6 to 10 pages, a semester-long reading journal and participation in class discussion. 
TEXTThe Story and Its Writer: An Introduction to Short Fiction (7th edition). Ann Charters, Ed.
Bedford / St. Martin’s, 2003. ISBN: 0-312-39729-1
PREREQUISITES:  COMP 100
M 5:30-8PM - LEE

LITR 250-01  CRITICAL APPROACHES TO LITERATURE                                                       (LA, AH2)
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Exploration of the various approaches and techniques used in understanding and judging literary works; includes the reading of representative literary works, written criticism, critical theory, and practice in literary criticism.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 150; 3 s.h. 200-level ALIT, ELIT, LITR or WLIT.
MWF 3-3:50PM - SADOW

LITR 294-01: SpTp: RIVER AS METAPHOR & REALITY                                                       (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: In this course we will examine a number of works that use the river as a unifying trope or theme. The texts considered will range from non-fiction works of natural history and exploration such as Henry David Thoreau's "A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers" and John Wesley Powell's "Exploration of the Colorado River" to imaginative works in which the river plays a metaphorical role in the development of theme. Fictional works will likely include Mark Twain's "Huckleberry Finn," James Dickey's "Deliverance," and Norman Maclean's "A River Runs Through It," as well as shorter works by Edward Abbey, John Burroughs, Ernest Hemingway, and Aldo Leopold
FORMAT:
TEXT:
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150.
MWF 2-2:50PM - PAYNE

LITR 394-01 SpTp: POETICS                                                                                                                       (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course examines theories of poetic form from the time of the ancient Greeks to the present. Students will study theories of language, aesthetics, politics, and psychology and the impact these theories had on the shape of poetry. We will also survey major poetic movements including Romanticism, French Symbolism, Surrealism,
Imagism, Dadaism, the New York School, Language Poetry, and the neo-formalism and neo-narrative
movements.
FORMAT:
TEXT:
PREREQUISITES:  COMP 200 or COMP 290, LlTR 150, or permission of the instructor
TTH 4-5:15PM – HECHT

LITR 394-81 SpTp: QUEER LITERATURE                                                                                             (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: What constitutes gay, lesbian, or queer literatures? What is the relationship between sexual desire, gender construction, and literary expression? This course will examine non-heterosexualities and identities in selected British and American literary texts from the Renaissance to the present. Culturally and historically situated definitions of gender, gender roles, sexuality and sexual orientation will guide our close readings of a variety of texts from novels and poetry to essays and short stories. Theoretical and critical readings in queer theory and gender studies will help students tackle broader cultural questions posed by this literature. By semester's end , students should be able to identify both the normative assumptions about heteronormativity within western culture and the varying aesthetic, political, and social concerns of gay, lesbian, and queer literatures.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXT: TBA
PREREQUISITES:  WMST 130 OR LlTR 100 or 150; COMP 200 or COMP 290; or permission of instructor.
Th 5:30-8PM – LOBDELL

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

WLIT 227-01   SEX AND GENDER IN GREEK LITERATURE                                          (LA, AH2)

COURSE SUMMARY : This course explores gender in ancient Greek literature by examining the roles of men and women in Greek society, how the Greeks defined the categories of male and female, and how concepts of masculinity and femininity shaped Greek literature, mythology, and daily life.
FORMAT:TBA
TEXT: TBA
PREREQUISITE: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150.
TTh 4-5:15PM – YATSUHASHI

WLIT 241-01   LITERATURES OF THE MIDDLE EAST                                                            (LA,HO2)

COURSE SUMMARY:  This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive overview of the emergence and development of modern literature of the Middle East through translated works. Selected texts representing the Arabic, Persian, Turkish, and Hebrew literary traditions will be contextualized socially, politically, and historically. Attention will be paid to the process of socio-political and cultural change and to their effects on theme, form, and language in literature. In addition, this course aims to develop writing skills in an upper division context and improve oral communication through projects and presentations
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: The Essential Tawfiq Al-hakim, U of Cairo Press, ISBN-10: 9774161513, The Journey of Ibn Fattouma, Naguib Mahfouz, Anchor Books, ISBN-10: 0385423349, Secret Son, Laila Lalami, ISBN-10: 1565129792, The Prince, Hushang Golshiri, Random House, ISBN-10: 1843431718, The Blind Owl, Sadegh Hedayat, Grove Press, ISBN-10: 0802131808, Poems of Nazim Hikmet, Nâzim Hikmet, Anvil Press, ISBN-10: 0856463299, The Garden of the Departed Cats, Bilge Karasu and Aron Aji, New Directions, ISBN-10: 0811215512, Arabesques: A Novel, Anton Shammas, University of California Press,  ISBN-10: 0520228324, A Pigeon and a Boy: A Novel, Meir Shalev, Schocken Publishing, ISBN-10: 0805212140
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150
TTh 11:30AM-12:45PM - FERRARA

WLIT 250-01   EUROPEAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE                                                                  (LA)   

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Survey of European literature in translation, focusing on cultural, aesthetic and literary trends from 1600 to present.
FORMAT: lecture/discussion
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES:SoS.
TTh 11:30AM-12:45PM- LEE

WLIT 253-81 CONTEMPORARY IRISH WRITERS                                                                             (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course surveys Irish writing (fiction, drama, and poetry) of the past few decades. Both Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland have experienced dramatic upheavals and changes since the 1970’s and Irish writers have responded to the shifting conditions in complex, creative ways. We will examine the literary responses of some major authors such as Edna O’Brien, Seamus Heaney, Brian Friel, Roddy Doyle, Paula Meehan, and Eavan Boland. Some of the topics likely to be covered include the opposition between city and country; the importance of artist in shaping national identities; the “troubles’ in Northern Ireland; issues of gender; and myth and cultural memory.
FORMAT: Students will be required to complete weekly quizzes, a midterm and a final exam. They must also submit two essays, a short one early in the semester and a longer one toward the end of the course. This class will run as a discussion, and students will be strongly encouraged to participate on a regular basis.
TEXTS: The required texts for this course will be specified further at a later date but might include an anthology similar to The Scribner Book of Irish Writing, as well as several individually-published volumes of plays, poems, and fiction.
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150
W 5:30-8PM – MORGAN-ZAYACHEK

WLIT 257-01   MODERN BLACK LITERATURE                                                                         (LA,  HO2)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course examines selected novels by African-American and African writers
since 1945.  The major issue we shall be raising has to do with how the works are affected structurally
and thematically by the social and political experiences of their authors.
FORMAT: Students will be expected to complete two quizzes, one essay (of 3-5 pages), a midterm and final
exam (essay format).
TEXTS: Native Son [Restored text] by Richard Wright, Harper, 1993.  Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison, Random [2nd],
1995, Go Tell it on the Mountain by James Baldwin, Random, 1952. Selected Poems of Langston Hughes
by Langston Hughes, Random, 1959, The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison, Penguin, 1993.  
Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe, Random, 1959.
Nervous Conditions by Tsitsi Dangarembga, PGW, [Rev.] 2001
PREREQUISITE: COMP 100 or  ALS 100; SoS
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: This course is cross-listed with ALS 257.
TTh 2:30-3:45PM - CHOONOO

WLIT 270-01   POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURE AND CULTURE: AFRICA                   (LA,  HO2)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course examines postcolonial literature culturally, thematically, and theoretically. Students read writers who have responded to the impact of colonialism in such geographies as Sub-Saharan Africa. We identify the cultural legacies of British imperialism and we locate expressions of resistance.
FORMAT: A midterm and final exam (in essay form); reading responses on each text.
TEXTS: TBA
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: This course is cross-listed with ALS 270
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100 or ALS 100; SoS
TTh 4-5:15PM – CHOONOO

WLIT 285-81 PORTRAITS OF THE ARTIST                                                                           (LA, AH2)

COURSE SUMMARY: These novels treat the theme of “The Artist.” The course will examine works of literature that deal with the formulation and development of the artistic imagination. The works concern themselves with the lives of the fledgling artists (primarily writers), the obstacles that frustrate their early attempts to be creative, and their success or failure in directing their imaginations towards uncovering the indigenous order alive in the world, or in creating personal fictive worlds that protect them from a meaningless existence.
FORMAT: Lecture/discussion. Two in-class examinations: one hour, ½ the grade, open book, any notes, articles, anything that will help. One paper: ½ the grade: 6 to 8 page paper. An in-depth reading, examination, and analysis of a major text chosen by the student and approved by the instructor.
TEXTS:  TBA
PREREQUISITES: SoS or 3 s.h. humanities.
W 6-8:30PM - MEANOR

WLIT 394-01 SpTp: ANCIENT RELIGIOUS WRITINGS                                                                         (LA)
 
COURSE SUMMARY: This course explores the religious writings of the ancient world in a global context. The literary traditions surveyed include Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judeo-Christianity, and Islam, which means that we will be reading from the Mahabharata, Writings of the Patriarchs, Analects, Bible, and Koran. Emphasis will be on the historical and cultural contexts from which these religious writings emerge, as well as on interpreting, comparing, and contrasting them.
FORMAT:
TEXT: Houston Smith, The Illustrated World's Religions: A Guide to Our Wisdom Traditions,
ISBN: 0060674407, Norman Calder, Classical Islam: A Sourcebook of Religious Literature
 ISBN: 0415240336, Wing-Tsit Chan, A Source Book in Chinese Philosophy, ISBN: 0691019649
Robert Carroll, The Bible: Authorized King James Version, ISBN: 0199535949, William Buck, Mahabharata: 35th Anniversary Edition, ISBN: 0520273028, Barbara C. Sproul, Primal Myths: Creation Myths Around the World, ISBN: 0060675012
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LlTR 100 or LITR 150
TTh 2:30-3:45PM - FERRARA

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT