English Department Course Offerings Spring 2018

 
 
ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

 

ALIT 201-01 AMERICAN LITERATURE, 1865 -- PRESENT (LA, H3)

COURSE SUMMARY: Survey of major writers of America from the Civil War to the present. Readings include novels, short stories, poetry, drama, and nonfiction-by writers such as Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, Edith Wharton, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, Robert Frost, T.S. Eliot, and Tony Kushner. The course covers-in broad strokes-some of the major literary and cultural movements from the last century and a half, with an emphasis upon close reading of representative texts.
FORMAT: Reading and discussion, lecture, quizzes, exams, directed writing.
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
MWF 1:00-1:50 pm - HOVIS

ALIT 286-01 AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN WRITERS (H3)

COURSE SUMMARY: A study of the history and representative writings of modern and contemporary African American and Caribbean American women writers including Gwendolyn Brooks, Zora Neale Hurston, Sarah Wright, Danzy Senna, Jessmyn Ward, Ann Petry, Paule Marshall, Jamaica Kincaid, Gayle Jones, Toni Morrison, and Carlene Hatcher Polite.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: SoS or 3 s.h. humanities
TTh 4-5:15pm - KARAGEORGOS

ALIT 365-01 RACE THE AMERICAN SOUTH (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: The course will explore the rich literature of the American South related to race relations. Particular emphasis will be given to writers dealing with the struggle of African Americans for equality and self-determination. We will read in a variety of genres, including fiction, poetry, autobiography, and essay.
FORMAT: Lecture, discussion, student presentations, exams, directed writing, and pop quizzes.
TEXTS: TBA.
PREREQUISITES: COMP100; LITR 100 or LITR 150.
MWF 10-10:50am -- HOVIS

ALIT 374-01 HAWTHORNE AND MELVILLE (LA, H3)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course will consider the work of Nathaniel Hawthorne and Herman Melville, two of the key figures associated with the 19th century's "American Renaissance" Close Study will be devoted to the major novels and short stories of the authors.
FORMAT: Midterm, final, and research paper.
TEXTS: Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter and The House of the Seven Gables, and Melivlle's Typee, Moby-Dick, and Billy Budd; miscellaneous shorter texts.
PREREQUISITES: JrS and 6 s.h. humanities
MWF 2-2:50pm - PAYNE

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

 

COMP 150-01 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING (LA, /BC3)

COURSE SUMMARY: Workshop in imaginative writing (verse or prose).
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
MWF 10-10:50am - VOGEL

COMP 150-02 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING (LA, BC3)

COURSE SUMMARY: Workshop in imaginative writing (verse or prose).
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
MWF 9-9:50am - VOGEL

COMP 150-03 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING (LA, BC3)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course provides a foundation in the basic theory and practice of fiction and poetry. By balancing student workshops with discussions and analysis of published work (in contemporary world literature), students are introduced to a range of models in these genres, which augment opportunities for creative expression. Writing exercises and formal assignments help students to develop proficiency in the technical aspects of fiction and poetry—such as structure, plot, characterization, point of view, dialogue, scene and setting, poetic voice, stanzaic development, rhythm, sound, image and metaphor. Emphasis will be placed on the writing process (including the role of revision in producing well-crafted work).
FORMAT: Reading and discussion, some lecture, formal analysis, in- and out-of-class writing, peer workshops, and conferences.
TEXTS: A Poetry Handbook, Mary Oliver, ISBN-13: 978-0156724005, Gotham Writers Workshop: Writing Fiction, James Daley, ISBN-13: 978-1582343303, Norton Anthology of World Literature: Volume F (third edition), ISBN-13: 978-0393913347
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
TTh 4-5:15pm - FERRARA

COMP 200-01 ADVANCED COMPOSITION (LA, BC3)

COURSE SUMMARY: Emphasizes advanced work in organization, style, and various rhetorical devices in expository writing.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100 or equivalent
TTh 8:30-9:45am -- RICE

COMP 200-02 ADVANCED COMPOSITION (LA, BC3)

COURSE SUMMARY: In this section of COMP200, we will divide our time equally between smaller and larger editing projects. We will begin with a study of the logic and stylistics of sentences and then move on to construct larger arguments in paragraphs and full essay forms. We will consider how the visual functions of metaphor and simile can facilitate communication, and will look at how visual elements combine with texts in two graphic novels, which will be the subject of several writing exercises. This hybrid class will require frequent on-line exercises which will replace our Friday class meetings, so that we will meet in class only on Mondays and Wednesdays.
FORMAT: Lecture, discussion and in-class exercises. Library Research Preparation Exercise, 5%; Grammar Exercises (6): 25%; Writing Exercises (6): 25%; Quizzes (6): 25%; Midterm Examination (1): 10%; Final Examination (1): 10%.
TEXTS: Required texts: John Langan and Beth Johnson, English Essentials (New York: McGraw Hill, 2005), ISBN 0-07-304326-5; Michael Harvey, The Nuts and Bolts of College Writing (Indianapolis: Hackett, 2003), ISBN 0-87220-573-8; Alan Moore, Dave Gibbons and John Higgins, Watchmen (New York: DC Comics, 1995), ISBN 978-0-930289-23-2; Art Spiegelman, Maus: A Survivor's Tale (New York: Pantheon, 1986), ISBN 0-394-74723-2. Recommended Texts: A good college dictionary of student's choice (e.g., Webster=s Collegiate); A good thesaurus of student's choice (e.g., Roget=s).
PREQUISITES: COMP 100 or equivalent.
MWF 12-12:50pm - CRANE

COMP 203-81 ADVANCED COMPOSITON: ENGLISH EDUCATION (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: Emphasizes advanced work in organization, style, and various rhetorical devices in expository writing. This course is designed to be taken by Secondary Education- English dual majors, and includes discussion of current theories and practices for teaching writing in secondary schools.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PRERQUISITES: COMP 100, COMP 200 or COMP 290.
M 5:30-8pm - GIBBINS

COMP 239-01 TECHNICAL AND PROFESSIONAL WRITING (LA, BC3)

COURSE SUMMARY: This class introduces students to the fields of technical and professional writing by acquainting them with the principles of workplace writing about technology and science. Studens will practice and learn (or learn more about) common forms of technical and professional writing like user documentation, usability studies, web sites, resumes, letters, memos, proposals, and reports. Although the course does emphasize science and technology, students from all majors with an interest in writing for the workplace are welcome.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100, SoS
MWF 9-9:50am -- MCDERMOTT

COMP 260-01 POETRY WORKSHOP (LA, BC3)

COURSE SUMMARY: This class is designed to provide a space where students can dedicate themselves to developing both their writing and their understanding of poetry. Our purpose is to create situations (rhetorical, logistical, psychological, intellectual) in which we can create poetry and learn to discern what works in our own writing and in others'. The course will have two primary components: composition and critique. On the composition end, we will focus on generating poems, grasping hold of the formal aspects of poetry, and widening our perspectives the varieties of poetry written today. To this end, class time will be spent discussing a wide range of published works, performing invention exercises, and generating all kinds of in-class writing. On the critique end, we will devote a significant portion each class to discussing and assessing student work. Critique is not simply a matter of deciding if a given poem is good or bad, successful or unsuccessful. It is a means of understanding what effects a writer is trying to accomplish, sharing influences, discussing the purposes of a work, and in every way helping each other produce interesting work. To effectively critique poetry it is necessary to further enhance our understanding of poetry as a genre and a practice. To that end, we will focus on developing a critical understanding of the work of established poets through discussion and research.
Format: In-class writing, discussion/evaluation of student work, field trips. Students will be responsible for a presentation and paper on the work of an individual poet.
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: "B" or higher in COMP 150; or permission of instructor. A poetry workshop works best when student come to class with a good understanding of poetry, its structures, and its history. While it is not a requirement, students who are not yet familiar with the American poetry canon should consider taking ALIT 210 in addition to this course.
MW 4-5:15pm - HECHT

COMP 270-01 FICTION WORKSHOP (LA, WS2)

COURSE SUMMARY: Students will learn the fundamentals of fiction writing and will apply them to the production of their own stories and, in workshop, to a discussion of work by other students in the course. Readings will include stories from an anthology, essays from a book on craft, and stories produced by other students in the class. In this course we will "read as writers," paying particular attention to the technical aspects of story writing-such as structure, plotting, character development, point of view, writing dialogue, and creating scenes. An emphasis will be placed on investigating students' own lived experiences as sources of fiction. May be repeated for up to 6 s.h. credit.
FORMAT: Workshop, discussion, and spot lecturing. The course requires the writing and revision of short fiction, and writing exercises to be completed in class and outside of class. The course also includes quizzes and examination as necessary.
TEXTS: Jerome Stern, Making Shapely Fiction (W.W. Norton, 2000) ASIN: B0068H3WDQ;The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction: 50 North American Stories Since 1970 (Touchstone Books, 2007) ISBN-10: 1416532277 / ISBN-13: 978-1416532279
PREREQUISITES:"B" in COMP 150 or permission of instructor
W 5:30-8pm - HOVIS

COMP 290-01 WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE (LA, BC3)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course teaches students to apply college writing skills to the discipline of literary studies. Students will increase proficiency in writing, researching, organizing, and revising skills in order to write succdessful papers in upper-division literature courses. Course builds on the skills learned in LITR 100 or LITR 150 and is only open to English majors/minors. Should be taken in the sophomore year.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100 and LITR 100 or LITR 150; Sos, ENGL, CHED, and ECC majors only
TTh 11:30am-12:45pm - SADOW

COMP 290-02 WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE (LA, BC3)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course teaches students to apply college writing skills to the discipline of literary studies. Students will increase proficiency in writing, researching, organizing, and revising skills in order to write succdessful papers in upper-division literature courses. Course builds on the skills learned in LITR 100 or LITR 150 and is only open to English majors/minors. Should be taken in the sophomore year.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100 and LITR 100 or LITR 150; Sos, ENGL, CHED, and ECC majors only
MWF 2-2:50 - YATSUHASHI

COMP 390 CAPSTONE IN ENGLISH--THE HAUNTED HOUSE IN LITERATURE

COURSE SUMMARY: What could be scarier than Tredennick teaching the Capstone? Tredennick teaching the Capstone on the Haunted House! This class will focus on the specific tradition of the literary haunted house in British and American novels and short stories from the nineteenth to the twenty-first century, exploring the ways in which they are vehicles for the expression of contemporary anxieties about gender, sexuality, immigration, technology, etc.
FORMAT: This is a discussion-based class.
TEXTS: May include selections from Poe, Dickens, Oyeyemi, Bradbury, Lovecraft, Shirley Jackson, Henry James, OATES, AND WHARTON.
PREREQUISITES: SrS (or departmental waiver); completion of LITR 150, COMP 200 or COMP 290, and LITR 250
TTh 1-2:15pm -- TREDENNICK



ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

 

ELIT 240-01 MEDIEVAL ENGLISH LITERATURE (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: In this course, we will explore a wide range of medieval literary genres (including myth, legend, hagiography, wisdom literature, romance, fabliau, dream vision, and lyric), reading tales of courtly love and chivalric battle, dragons, wizards, warlords, hermits, saints, and some truly spectacular sinners. We will also examine a number of medieval literary techniques (including allegorical composition and exegesis, as well as rhetorical ornamentation), and themes (including iconic imagery and rhetorical topoi). Students completing the course will also have acquired a overarching familiarity with the major events of medieval history (migratory patterns, economic and political evolutions, medical disasters, and religious / racial persecutions). Students will have practiced reading literary texts in a cultural and historical context, and writing about these texts from an historical as well as an aesthetic perspective.
FORMAT: The class will be conducted in a hybrid format, meeting twice a week, with the third class meeting replaced by on-line exercises. Lecture, class discussion, in-class quizzes, on-line exercises, and a research essay. Grading Weights: Practice Exercise (1): 1%; Quizzes, in-class (4): 35%; Vocabulary Exercises, on-line (7), 10%; Reading Comprehension Exercises, on-line (7), 15%; Research Exercises, on-line (2): 4%; Research Essay (1, submitted on-line): 15%; Review Exercises (timed on-line exercises, replacing the usual Midterm and Final examinations): 20%.
TEXTS: Jeffrey Gantz, Early Irish Myths and Sagas (New York: Penguin, 1981), ISBN 0-14-044397-5. Kevin Crossley-Holland, The Anglo-Saxon World (New York: Oxford, 2009), ISBN 0-199538719. Brian Stone, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (New York, Penguin, 1974), ISBN 0-14-044093-5. Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte D’Arthur, Vol. 2 (New York: Penguin, 1969), ISBN 0-14-143043-1. Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales (New York: Penguin, 1977), ISBN 0-14-044022-4.
PREREQUISITES: COMP100; LITR 100 OR LITR 150
MWF 3-3:30pm - CRANE

ELIT 241-01 THE ENGLISH RENAISSANCE (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY:  This course is designed for students who want to explore the rich tapestry of literary, political, and cultural texts throughout the English Renaissance (roughly 15th -17th centuries).  Our primary areas of focus will be Poetry & Politics; Queen Elizabeth & the Cult of Love; and the Stage & Social Change. Readings will include poetry, prose, drama.
FORMAT:  Classes will be a combination of discussion and lecture.Class participation crucial; weekly writing assignments and/or discussion questions; oral presentation; midterm and final exam; 7-10 page paper.
TEXTS: The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Volume B: The Sixteenth Century/The Early Seventeenth Century ISBN-10: 0393927180; The Roaring Girl, Norton Critical Edition, (by Thomas Middleton) ISBN-10:0393932775
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100, LITR 100 or LITR 150; or permission of the instructor.
MWF 12-12:50pm - FININ

ELIT 270-01 SHAKESPEARE (LA, H3)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course focuses on a wide range of Shakespeare’s work and traces the development of his career from the 1590s through 1612. Increasing your understanding and enjoyment of Shakespeare's plays and poems will be our primary goal. In addition to careful reading of these texts, we will consider their historical, biographical and cultural contexts. Toward that end, we will discuss Renaissance notions of love, friendship and family; the politics of poetry and court culture; and the impact of emerging “New World” discoveries on Shakespeare’s drama.
FORMAT: Combination of lectures & discussion; class attendance crucial; frequent writing assignments and quizzes, 2 essay exams, plus midterm and final exams.
TEXTS: The Norton Shakespeare: Essential Plays / The Sonnets.  3rd Edition ISBN# 978-0393938630
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
MWF 1-1:50pm - FININ

ELIT 275-01 JANE AUSTEN (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: A woman who mostly wrote about less-than-thrilling topics, such as slight conversational rudenesses over tea with baronets, continues to be so overwhelmingly popular and influential that she has spurred not only legions of young devoted fans, but unlikely pop culture spin offs of the zombie variety, detective variety, romance variety, and so on. We will not read these spin offs (they’re pretty bad), but we will closely read some Austen originals to try to figure out what she was really getting at and (maybe in that way) why she continues to have such resonance today.
FORMAT: This is a discussion-based class.
TEXTS: Northanger Abbey; Emma; Pride and Prejudice, and Persuasion.
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150
TTh 10-11:15am - TREDENNICK

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

 

LING 215-01 INTRODUCTION TO EDITING AND PUBLISHING (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY:  Students will be introduced to the principles of both copy-editing (or proofreading) and more substantive content editing. The course will also include an overview of the publishing industry and discussion of careers within it. In the final part of the class, students will peer-review and edit others’ writing in order to produce an issue of a journal in either print or online format.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: SoS, COMP 100
MWF 10-10:50am -- DOUGHTY

 

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

 

LITR 150-01 INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDIES (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: Introduction to Literary Studies is designed for those who are or wish to be English majors. It provides a foundation for the contexts, concepts, and methods relevant to the study of literature. Course coverage will include instruction in the use of relevant terminology and concepts, familiarization with literary and historical periods, and an overview of literary and genre conventions. The course should be taken within one year of declaring the major.
FORMAT: A mixture of lecture and discussion. Frequent writing assignments, including 3-5 short essays, as well as a midterm and final exam.
TEXTS: Laurie G. Kirszner and Stephen R. Mandell, eds. Literature: Reading, Reacting, Writing. Compact 6th edition. New York: Thomson/Wadsworth, 2007.
PREREQUISITES: Declared English Major; or by permission of the Department.
MW 5:30-6:45pm- HECHT

LITR 250-01 CRITICAL APPROACHES TO LITERATURE (LA, AH2)

COURSE SUMMARY: Exploration of the various approaches and techniques used in understanding and judging literary works; includes the reading of representative literary works, written criticism, critical theory, and practice in literary criticism. (LA, AH2)
TEXTS: TBA
FORMAT: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 150; 3 s.h. 200-level ALIT, ELIT, LITR or WLIT.
TTh 4-5:15pm - SADOW

LITR 294-01 SPTP: POETICS (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course examines theories of poetic form from the time of the ancient Greeks to the present. Students will study theories of language, aesthetics, politics, and psychology and the impact these theories had on the shape of poetry. We will also survey major poetic movements including Romanticism, Imagism, Surrealism, Dadaism, New York School, Language Poetry, and the neo-formalistic and narrative movements.
FORMAT: Lecture, discussion, and student presentations. Students will write short response papers and a final research paper.
TEXTS: Readings will include selections from Plato’s The Republic, Aristotle’s Poetics, the English and American Romantics (Wordsworth, Keats, Shelly, Emerson, Whitman) and twentieth-century Modernist and Post-Modernist movements.
PREREQUISITES: COMP 200; LITR 150; LITR 250; 6 s.h. 200-level courses in ALIT, ELIT, LITR or WLIT
T 5:30-8pm - HECHT

LITR 306 CHILDREN’S LITERATURE (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course explores the diverse literatures for children and adolescents, particularly the multicultural and generic variety of literatures available. This semester will focus specifically on books by and about people from minority communities. 
FORMAT: A combination of lecture and discussion. Students will write short analyses of texts on Blackboard discussion boards, write a short paper, give a presentation, and complete a final exam. 
TEXTS:  TBA
PREREQUISITESCOMP 100, and LITR 150, and 6 s.h. of 200-level ENGL coursework.
MWF 12-12:50pm - DOUGHTY

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

 

WLIT 200-01: WORLD LITERATURE-ANCIENT TO MEDIEVAL (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: In this course, we study ancient and medieval literary works from Egypt, India, China, Persia, and Japan. The Egyptian Book of the Dead explores the nature of death and notions of the afterworld, and the Mahabharata recounts the saga of a legendary war between the Pandavas and Kurus. The Chinese Art of War and Dao de Jing provide a startling juxtaposition of ancient Chinese thought regarding social stability, while the Persian classic Conference of the Birds allegorizes the quest for religious salvation and serves as an introduction to the autobiographical writings of the mystic Al-Ghazali. The Pillow Book, written during Heian period provides detailed portrayals of the medieval Japanese court, and Essays in Idleness and Hojoki sheds light on the lives of Buddhist monks in medieval Japan.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS:Egyptian Book of the Dead, Ogden Goelet, ISBN-13: 978-1452144382, Mahabharata: A Modern Retelling, Carole Satyamurti, ISBN-13: 978-0393352498, Sun Tzu: The Art of War, Thomas Cleary, ISBN-13: 978-0877735373, Al-Ghazali's Path to Sufism: His Deliverance from Error, al-Ghazali ISBN-13: 978-1887752305, The Conference of Birds, Farid ud-Din Attar, ISBN-13: 978-0140444346, The Pillow Book, Sei Shonagon, ISBN-13: 978-0140448061, Essays in Idleness and Hojoki, Kenko, ISBN-13: 978-0141192109
PREREQUISITES:  COMP 100
TTh 2:30-3:34pm -FERRARA

WLIT 212-01 SURVEY OF GREEK AND ROMAN LITERATURE (LA, WC3)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course offers an introduction to the various genres of Greek and Roman literature, including epic, lyric poetry, tragedy, comedy, philosophy, history, and satire.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
MWF 1-1:50pm - YATSUHASHI

WLIT 270-01 POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURE AND CULTURE: AFRICA (LA, OW3)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course examines postcolonial literature culturally, thematically, and theoretically. Students read writers who have responded to the impact of colonialism in such geographies as North, West, and Sub-Saharan Africa and the Caribbean. The cultural legacies of British and French imperialism and expressions of resistance to it are explored.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100 or ALS 100
TTh 8:30-9:45am - KARAGEORGOS

WLIT 294-01 SpTp: ENGLIGHTMENT (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: The period we still think of as the "Enlightenment" was an era of literary creativity, experiment, and wit that occured in the context of intellectual and scientific change, colonialism, and challenges to traditional ideas of gender, sexuality, genre, religion, and political power. We will examine fiction, theater, and poetry by authors such as Cervantes, Moliere, Behn, Rochester, Lafayette, Marivaux, Pope, Voltaire, Diderot,and Goethe alongside essays by writers like Bacon, Pascal, Locke, Hobbes, Raynal, Astell, Rousseau, Kant, Herder, Wollstonecraft, and Kleist.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150
TTh 1-2:15pm -- SADOW