English Department Course Offerings Fall 2018

 
 
ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

 

ALIT 200-01: AMERICAN LITERATURE TO 1865 (LA, H3)
COURSE SUMMARY: A survey of American literature from the colonial era to the Civil War, including works by Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Edgar Allan Poe, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Frederick Douglass, and Harriet Beecher Stowe.
FORMAT: Lecture/ discussion. Midterm, final, and short quizzes.
TEXTS: Norton Anthology of American Literature, Package I (include Hawthorne’s, The Scarlet Letter)
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
MWF 2-2:50PM--PAYNE

ALIT 226-01: CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN POETRY (LA, H3)
COURSE SUMMARY: The goal of this course is to introduce students to the major movements in American poetry from 1950 to the preset. Our focus will primarily be on developing an appreciation of contemporary poetry and an understanding of how aesthetic movements develop and change. In addition to considering specific literary movements include San Franscisco Renaissance (or Beat writers), the Black Mountain, Deep Image, New York Schools, we will also look at how social and political action inspired new approaches to poetry, such as with the Black Arts Movement and the Feminist movement.
FORMAT: Lecture, discussion, small group research and presentations, quizzes and exams and two essays. Because we will rely a lot on discussion, faithful attendance and involvement is required.
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: SoS or 3 s.h. humanities.
TTh 1-2:15PM - HECHT

ALIT 351-01: LITERATURE OF THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE (LA, H3)
COURSE SUMMARY: A study of Black writers in Harlem between 1920 and 1929.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100 or ALS 100; ALS 273 or LITR 250.
MW 9-9:50AM--KARAGEORGOS

ALIT 373-01: UPSTATE NEW YORK WRITERS (LA)
COURSE SUMMARY: This course examines the work of American writers who live in and/or write about upstate New York of the present day. We will be reading works by writers such as Russell Banks, William Kennedy,  Richard Russo, Alison Lurie, George Saunders, and Billy Collins.
FORMAT: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 200 or COMP 290; LITR 150; LITR 250; 6 s.h. 200-level courses in ALIT, ELIT, LITR, or WLIT.
TEXTS: TBA
MWF 3-3:50PM--PAYNE

 

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

 

COMP 150-01:  INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING  (LA, BC3)
COURSE SUMMARY: This course provides a solid foundation in the basics of theory and practice in fiction and poetry. The course balances workshop of student writing with a discussion of published work (focusing on contemporary writing, especially in fiction). The purpose of the course is to introduce students to a range of models in these two genres and to provide opportunities for students to express their own voices by emulating these models.
While students will likely find that the reading skills they develop in this course will improve their performance in other literature courses, we will pursue a somewhat different focus than that to which they may be accustomed; we will "read as writers," paying particular attention to the technical aspects of fiction and poetry writing--such as structure, plotting, character development, point of view, writing dialogue, creating scenes, poetic voice, stanzaic development, rhythm, texture of sound, image and metaphor.
Instead of focusing primarily on what the stories and poems we read mean, we will spend considerably more time discussing how they mean. We will also address the writing process.
FORMAT: Reading and discussion, lecture, formal analysis, in- and out-of-class writing, peer workshops, quizzes, final exam, and conferences.
TEXTS:  TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
W 5:30-8PM--HOVIS

COMP 150-02: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING (LA, BC3)
COURSE SUMMARY: Workshop in imaginative writing (verse or prose).
FORMAT:
TEXTS:  TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
MWF 9-9:50AM--VOGEL

COMP 150-03: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING (LA, BC3)
COURSE SUMMARY: Workshop in imaginative writing (verse or prose).
FORMAT:
TEXTS:  TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
MWF 10-10:50AM--VOGEL

COMP 150-04:  INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING (LA, BC3)  
COURSE SUMMARY: This course provides a solid foundation in the basics of theory and practice in fiction and poetry. The course balances workshop of student writing with a discussion of published work (focusing on contemporary writing, especially in fiction). The purpose of the course is to introduce students to a range of models in these two genres and to provide opportunities for students to express their own voices by emulating these models.
While students will likely find that the reading skills they develop in this course will improve their performance in other literature courses, we will pursue a somewhat different focus than that to which they may be accustomed; we will "read as writers," paying particular attention to the technical aspects of fiction and poetry writing--such as structure, plotting, character development, point of view, writing dialogue, creating scenes, poetic voice, stanzaic development, rhythm, texture of sound, image and metaphor.
Instead of focusing primarily on what the stories and poems we read mean, we will spend considerably more time discussing how they mean. We will also address the writing process.
FORMAT: Reading and discussion, lecture, formal analysis, in- and out-of-class writing, peer workshops, quizzes, final exam, and conferences.
TEXTS:  TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
W 4:45-7:15--HOVIS

 COMP 200-01: ADVANCED COMPOSITION (LA, BC3)
COURSE SUMMARY: In this section of COMP200, we will divide our time equally between smaller and larger editing projects.  We will begin with a study of the logic and stylistics of sentences and then move on to construct larger arguments in paragraphs and full essay forms.We will consider how the visual functions of metaphor and simile can facilitate communication, and will look at how visual elements combine with texts in two graphic novels, which will be the subject of several writing exercises. This hybrid class will require frequent on-line exercises which will replace our Friday class meetings, so that we will meet in class only on Mondays and Wednesdays.
FORMAT: Lecture, discussion and in-class exercises.Library Research Preparation Exercise, 5%; Grammar Exercises (6): 25%; Writing Exercises (6): 25%; Quizzes (6): 25%; Midterm Examination (1): 10%; Final Examination (1): 10%.
TEXTS: Required texts: John Langan and Beth Johnson, English Essentials (New York: McGraw Hill, 2005), ISBN 0-07-304326-5; Michael Harvey, The Nuts and Bolts of College Writing (Indianapolis: Hackett, 2003), ISBN 0-87220-573-8; Alan Moore, Dave Gibbons and John Higgins, Watchmen (New York: DC Comics, 1995), ISBN 978-0-930289-23-2; Art Spiegelman, Maus: A Survivor’s Tale (New York: Pantheon, 1986), ISBN 0-394-74723-2. Recommended Texts: A good college dictionary of student’s choice (e.g., Webster=s Collegiate); A good thesaurus of student’s choice (e.g., Roget=s).
PREQUISITES: COMP 100 or equivalent.
MW 12-12:50PM--CRANE

COMP 200-02: ADVANCED COMPOSITION (LA, BC3)
COURSE SUMMARY:Emphasizes advanced work in organization, style, and various rhetorical devices in expository writing.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS:  TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100 or equivalent.
TTh 10-11:15AM--RICE

COMP 290-01: WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE (LA, BC3)
COURSE SUMMARY: This course teaches students to apply college writing skills to the discipline of literary studies. Students will increase proficiency in writing, researching, organizing, and revising skills in order to write successful papers in upper-division literature courses. Course builds on the skills learned in LITR 100 or LITR 150.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150; SoS.
W 5:30-8PM--HECHT

COMP 290-02: WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE (LA, BC3)
COURSE SUMMARY: This course teaches students to apply college writing skills to the discipline of literary studies. Students will increase proficiency in writing, researching, organizing, and revising skills in order to write successful papers in upper-division literature courses. Course builds on the skills learned in LITR 100 or LITR 150.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150; SoS.
MWF 2-2:50PM--SADOW

COMP 390-01: CAPSTONE IN ENGLISH: URBAN FANTASYCOURSE SUMMARY: Students will explore urban fantasy texts, both written and film, and examine their place in the larger fantasy genre as well as in literary studies. Students will choose an aspect of urban fantasy to research throughout the semester and develop a seminar paper on that topic in stages.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS:
Gaiman, Neil. Neverwhere. William Morrow, 2016. ISBN: 978-0062476371
Estep, Jennifer. Spider’s Bite. Pocket Books, 2010. ISBN: 978-1439147979
Wells, Jaye. Dirty Magic. Orbit, 2014. ISBN: 978-0316228435
Kadrey, Richard. Sandman Slim. Harper Voyager, 2014. ISBN: 978-0061714351
Glass, Seressia. Shadow Blade. Gallery Books, 2013. ISBN: 978-1476747484
Healey, Karen. Guardian of the Dead. Little, Brown Books for Young Readers, 2011. ISBN: 978-0316044387
PREREQUISITES: SrS (or departmental waiver); completion of LITR 150, COMP 200 or COMP 290, and LITR 250
MWF 12-12:50PM--DOUGHTY



ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

 

ELIT 200-01: BEGINNINGS TO EARLY RENAISSANCE (LA, H3)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course surveys the overall shape of early British literature, including Celtic myth, Anglo-Saxon heroic tales, Arthurian legend, courtly love poetry, and Shakespearean comedy.  We will consider how various cultures contribute magical, religious, and political materials to the evolution of British literature, and we will examine various modes of literary interpretation, including allegory and symbolism. The hybrid format of this course (combining in-class meetings Mondays and Wednesdays with on-line work replacing class meetings on Fridays) allows students to develop their writing, vocabulary, and reading comprehension skills through on-line exercises.
FORMAT: Lecture and Discussion. Grading Weights: 29% Quizzes (in class); 15% Writing Exercises; 31% On-line Exercises reviewing readings, lectures, and vocabulary; 15% Midterm Examination (in class); 10% Final Examination (on-line).
TEXTS: Christopher Baswell and Anne Howland Schotter, eds., The Longman Anthology of British Literature, Vol. 1A: The Middle Ages (New York, Pearson Longman, 2010), 4th edition, paperback, ISBN 978-0-205-65530-4; Constance Jordan and Clare Carroll, eds., The Longman Anthology of British Literature, Vol. 1B: The Early Modern Period (New York, Pearson Longman, 2006), 4th edition, paperback, ISBN 978-0-205-65532-8
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100.
MW 4-4:50PM--CRANE

ELIT 202-01: 18th C. TO PRESENT (LA, H3)
COURSE SUMMARY: This course will survey British (English, Scottish, Welsh) and Irish literature from the Romantic period to the present. We will be studying Romantic writers like the poets Wordsworth, Shelley and Keats; Victorian novelists like Dickens, Eliot, or Hardy; and modernists like Woolf, Joyce, and Eliot, and Yeats, and more contemporary writers like Auden, Larkin, and Rushdie. Students will play a role in selecting specific texts/ authors for discussion.
FORMAT:
Discussion with background lecture and student presentations. Students will take a midterm and a final, give an oral presentation, post weekly reading responses to Blackboard, and write 2-3 formal essays.
TEXTS:
A large anthology such as the Norton or Broadview and possible a novel TBD.
PREREQUISITES:
COMP 100
TTh 1-2:15PM--BLACK

ELIT 243-01: EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE (LA, H3)
COURSE SUMMARY: We will read eighteenth-century novels, essays, satirical prose, journalism, drama, and poetry. There will be a focus on the shifting nature of the novel, with particular attention to the relationship between genre and gender. We will also examine the changing cultural ideas that produced developments in poetry, art, science, and enlightenment philosophy.
FORMAT: Discussion and lecture.
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150.
MWF 12-12:50PM--SADOW

ELIT 270-01: SHAKESPEARE (LA, H3)
COURSE SUMMARY: This course focuses on a wide range of Shakespeare’s work and traces the development of his career from the 1590s through 1612. Increasing your understanding and enjoyment of Shakespeare’s plays and poems will be our primary goal.In addition to careful reading of these texts, we will consider their historical, biographical and cultural contexts.Toward that end, we will discuss Renaissance notions of love, friendship and family; the politics of poetry and court culture; and the impact of emerging “New World” discoveries on Shakespeare’s drama.
FORMAT: Combination of lectures & discussion; class attendance crucial; frequent writing assignments and quizzes, 2 essay exams, plus midterm and final exams.
TEXTS: The Norton Shakespeare: Essential Plays / The Sonnets.  3rd Edition.Ed. Stephen Greenblatt.  Norton, 2016.  ISBN 978-0-393-93863-0
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
MWF 2-2:50PM--FININ

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

 

LING 150-01: INTRO TO LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS  (LA, H3)
COURSE SUMMARY: Students will explore a variety of topics about language and linguistics, including language acquisition, phonetics and phonology (sounds), morphology (word formation), syntax, semantics, regional and social variation, language and the brain, and the development of language. 
FORMAT: Lecture and discussion. Students will take several quizzes and exams.
TEXTS: TBA
MWF 10-10:50AM - DOUGHTY

LING 201-01: LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY (LA, H3)
COURSE SUMMARY: Students will study how humans develop and use language and how language is influenced by, among other things, region, class, culture and gender. Students will learn how speakers move between and within different types of language communities through code switching and investigate the problems that occur when people do not adapt to new linguistic situations.
FORMAT: Primarily lecture and discussion. Three online exams; three short papers; in-class group facilitations.
TEXT: Van Herk: What Is Sociolinguistics? Other readings provided, TBA.
PREREQUISTIES: SoS or LING 150
TTh 11:30AM-12:45PM--LEE

LING 210-01: TRADITIONAL GRAMMAR: ENGLISH (LA)
COURSE SUMMARY: Students will examine the grammar of English from a sentence structure perspective. Beginning with sentence patterns, they will progress to parts of sentences and how the sentences are constructed to make meaning. They will also discuss the relationship of grammar to mechanics in writing.
FORMAT: In-class discussions and exercises, as well as some lecture. The primary evaluation will be through several exams.
TEXT: Packet of materials
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; SoS
MWF 8-8:50AM - DOUGHTY

 

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

 

LITR 150-01: INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDIES (LA)
COURSE SUMMARY: Introduction to Literary Studies is designed for those who are or wish to be English majors. It provides a foundation for the contexts, concepts, and methods relevant to the study of literature. Course coverage will include instruction in the use of relevant terminology and concepts, familiarization with literary and historical periods, and an overview of literary and genre conventions. The course should be taken within one year of declaring the major. This section will include a brief unit focused on the author of SUNY-Oneonta's Common Read.
FORMAT: Primarily discussion, with occasional mini-lectures and peer-review/ workshopping of student writing. Students will be asked to choose 1-2 works from the textbook and to help begin class discussions of them. In addition, students will write two or three papers, post a weekly reading response to Blackboard, and take three unit tests.
TEXTS: Kirszner & Mandell, Literature: Reading, Reacting, Writing; the Common Read text (Mock's Redefining Realness) and 1-2 shorter works by the same author.
PREREQUISITES: Declared English major or permission of the department.
TTh 2:30-3:45PM - BLACK

LITR 150-02: INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDIES (LA)
COURSE SUMMARY: Introduction to Literary Studies is designed for those who are or wish to be English majors. It provides a foundation for the contexts, concepts, and methods relevant to the study of literature. Course coverage will include instruction in the use of relevant terminology and concepts, familiarization with literary and historical periods, and an overview of literary and genre conventions. The course should be taken within one year of declaring the major.
FORMAT: A mixture of lecture and discussion. Frequent writing assignments, including 3-5 short essays, as well as a midterm and final exam.
TEXTS: Laurie G. Kirszner and Stephen R. Mandell, eds. Literature: Reading, Reacting, Writing. Compact 6th edition. New York: Thomson/Wadsworth, 2007.
PREREQUISITES: Declared English Major; or by permission of the Department.
TTh 4-5:15PM--HECHT

LITR 220-01: SHORT FICTION (LA, H3)
COURSE SUMMARY: Appreciation and understanding of form and meaning in fiction through reading and analysis of selected works.
FORMAT: Since the course is a survey of this interesting genre, we will be reading works in chronological order beginning with some of the earliest versions of the form. At the same time, we will be reading a few works that speak to basic issues in the history and theory of the genre's development. There will be two short answer/essay examinations, a final paper of 6 to 8 pages on a topic to be determined, and regular reading quizzes.
TEXT: TBD
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100
W 5:30-8:00PM--LEE

LITR 247-01: ENVIRONMENTAL HUMANITIES (LA)
COURSE SUMMARY: This course explores the various ways that the humanities help us understand the relationships between humans and the environment. We will examine insights from literature, philosophy, religious studies, and the arts. To achieve sustainability we need to explore human values, perceptions, beliefs, fears and cultural inclinations in shaping humanity's relationship to the natural world and human landscapes we have created. A deep understanding of the humanities and humanistic methodologies is a necessary component of the interdisciplinary solution of environmental problems we face such as global climate change and loss of biodiversity.
FORMAT: Primarily class discussions, with occasional mini-lectures; class attendance crucial; frequent writing assignments and quizzes, 5-7 page paper, midterm and final exams.
TEXTS: Sustainability. Leslie Paul Thiele. 2nd Edition. ISBN-10: 1509511075; Spiritual Ecology: The Cry of the Earth. Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee (Ed.) 2nd Edition. ISBN-10: 1941394140; Active Hope. Joanna Macy & Chris Johnstone. ISBN-10: 1577319729; Ecotopia. Ernest Callenbach. ISBN-10: 0553348477; others TBA
PREREQUISITES: SoS
MWF 12-12:50PM--FININ

LITR 250-01: APPROACHES TO LITERATURE (LA, H3)
COURSE SUMMARY: Exploration of the various approaches and techniques used in understanding and judging literary works; includes the reading of representative literary works, written criticism, critical theory, and practice in literary criticism. Offered Fall and Spring.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 150 with a grade of "C" or higher; 3 s.h. 200-level ALIT, ELIT, LITR or WLIT.
MWF 3-3:50PM--SADOW

LITR 307-01: MADNESS IN LITERATURE (LA)

COURSE SUMMARY: This course will read literary texts from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries that deal with madness, alongside "medical" texts from the same period that attempt to diagnose and define it. We will be seeking, first, to explore how literature represents insanity in ways that both reflect and help construct discourse about issues such as gender, sexuality and race. Second, we will examine the critical urge (including our own) to “psychoanalyze” literary characters and their authors. Assignments include an exam in which you will get to perform a Freudian dream analysis, and a project that will offer you the chance to argue with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, the American Psychiatric Association's catalog of mental illnesses.
PREREQUISITES: LIT 150; COMP 200 or COMP 290; 6 s.h. ALIT, ELIT, LITR or WLIT
FORMAT: Discussion.
TEXTS: include short stories by Poe and Melville, Stevenson’s Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Freud’s A Case of Hysteria, and others.
MWF 1-1:50PM--TREDENNICK

ALIT COMP ELIT LING LITR WLIT

 

WLIT 241-01: LITERATURES OF THE MIDDLE EAST (LA, OW3)
COURSE SUMMARY: This course provides an overview of the origin and development of the religious and secular literatures of the Middle East. Selected texts represent the Arabic, Persian, Turkish, and Hebrew literary traditions, and readings are contextualized socially, philosophically, and historically. Particular attention is given to political transformations resulting from a gradual shift from tradition to modernity, and their effects on the literary arts (in terms of theme, form, and meaning). In addition, this course develops writing and critical thinking skills in an upper division context.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: Gilgamesh: A New English Version, Stephen Mitchell, ISBN-13: 978-0743261692, The Bible: Authorized King James Version, Robert Carroll, ISBN-13: 978-0199535941, The Qur'an, M. A. S. Abdel Haleem, ISBN-13: 978-0199535958, The Arabian Nights, Deckle Edge, ISBN-13: 978-0393331660, Vis and Ramin, Fakhraddin Gorgani, ISBN-13: 978-0143105626, The Travels of Ibn Battutah, Tim Mackintosh-Smith, ISBN-13: 978-0330418799, Literary Landscapes from the Modern Middle East, Reza Aslan, ISBN 978-0-393-34077-8
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150
MWF 3-3:50P--FERRARA

WLIT 257-01: MODERN BLACK LITERATURE (LA, OW3)
COURSE SUMMARY: The study of Black American Literature written since 1950, using fiction, essays, poetry,
and biography (or autobiography) to illustrate the development and influence of contemporary Black writers.
FORMAT: TBA
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITE: COMP 100 or ALS 100; SoS
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: This course is cross-listed with ALS 257.
MW 2-2:50PM--KARAGEORGOS

WLIT 283-01: HOMER (LA)
COURSE SUMMARY: A study and close reading of Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey. Topics to be discussed include the warrior ethic, heroic friendship, oral vs. literate poetry, the social function of epic and its historicity, myth and epic, and the changing nature of heroism. We will also consider the importance of the Homeric tradition in the ancient and the modern world.
TEXTS: TBA
PREREQUISITES: COMP 100; LITR 100 or LITR 150
MWF 1-1:50PM - YATSUHASHI