Courses

 
 


Geology
    Meteorology   Oceanography  Earth Science     

 

Courses in Geology (GEOL)

GEOL 115 - Science of Natural Disasters

3 s.h.

Course provides an overview of natural disasters, such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, floods, tsunamis, mass movement, meteorite impact, and severe weather (including hurricanes and longer term climate change). Students will learn about the geological and meteorological processes responsible for producing these disasters through the use of various national and international data sources, as well as local and national case studies. Laboratories will provide for experiences in the application of the scientific method. In addition, this course will demonstrate how science can influence personal, societal, and governmental decisions.

 

GEOL 120 - Introduction to Geology

3 s.h.

Introduction to geological principles;the development of the earth's surface; the nature and effects of changes on the earth's surface; the origin and recognition of minerals and rocks; field and laboratory study of minerals, rocks, topographic maps. Laboratories frequently taught by graduate teaching assistants.,LA, NL2

GEOL 150 - Introduction to Forensic Geology

3 s.h.

Geologic materials provide important evidence in many criminal cases. This course will introduce students to the nature of geologic evidence, scientific protocols for the collection and examination of this evidence and selected techniques for identification of geologic materials. Students will develop an understanding of the geologic processes and contexts which form various geologic materials. With a firm grounding in the scientific basis for the use of geologic materials as evidence, students will apply this knowledge in a variety of case studies and representative scenarios. The laboratory portion of the course emphasizes recognition of minerals, rocks, soils, microfossils and man-made materials of geologic origin. Analyses of case studies, laboratory and project reports emphasize scientific reasoning and enhancement of writing skills., LA, CPA, NL2, WS2

 

GEOL 182 Water and the Blue Planet

3 s.h.

Water and the Blue Planet offers a holistic exploration of the science of water and its value to human society. Beginning with the unique properties of water that make it an essential ingredient for life, we investigate the movement of water above and below the Earth’s surface, the geologic formations that store water, the role of water in shaping landscapes, the hazards poised to society by drought and flood events, and the origin and effects of contemporary water shortages. Through hands-on lab activities, lectures, readings, and class discussions, students will learn how to evaluate water issues using the scientific method, how to protect and manage water resources to meet the needs of current and future generations, and how to communicate this knowledge to others.,LA, NL2

 

GEOL 201 - Environmental Geology

3 s.h.

A study of the practical aspects of geology that relate natural processes to man's environment; topics include Environmental Impact Statements, soil properties, ground stability, erosion controls, seismic hazards, solid waste disposal, and surface runoff and flooding.,LA, IE, TQ) Prerequisite: GEOL 120.

GEOL 220 - Historical Geology

4 s.h.

An overview of Earth's history, including accounts of changes in life through time, combined with an exploration of the techniques that are used to read and interpret geologic history. Laboratory and field exercises illustrate events in Earth's history, introduce techniques for reading geologic history, and provide opportunities for students to engage in geologic inquiry. Writing in the discipline is emphasized through laboratory reports, field trip reports, and research papers.( LA)  Prerequisite: GEOL 120

GEOL 230 - Energy Resources and the Environment

3 s.h.

This course provides an overview of the basic geologic,engineering, economic, and environmental factors controlling the availability and use of energy resources. Topics willinclude traditional energy resources (e.g. fossil fuels, uranium, and hydropower) and alternative energy resources (e.g. hydrogen fuel cells, wind, solar, geothermal, and tidal), as well as the mineral resources used to store, convert, and transport energy (e.g. batteries, engines, and electrical wiring). The course will emphasize the environmental consequences of the development and utilization of each resource, and the long-range sustainability of each resource. (LA, CPA)  Cross-Listed as ENVS 230.   Prerequisite: GEOL 120 or GEOL 115 or GEOL 150 or GEOL 182

GEOL 242 - Mineralogy 

4 s.h.

The study of minerals, their physical and chemical properties, classification, origin, and geologic occurrence; basic principles of optical mineralogy, crystallography and crystal chemistry. Processes of formation on minerals and their assemblages in specific tectonic settings are emphasized. Mineral identification in hand specimen and in thin section is utilized in laboratory. (LA, CPA)  Prerequisites: GEOL 120, or GEOL 115, or GEOL 150 or GEOL 182 and CHEM 111

GEOL 275 Geologic Data And Analysis 


4 s.h.

An examination of field and remote sensing techniques for gathering spatially distributed and oriented geologic data and common techniques for the preparation, analysis and presentation of these data. Brunton compasses, handheld GPS units and surveying tools will be utilized in collection of field data. Construction of GIS maps, using a variety of bases (e.g., topographic maps, aerial photos, satellite images, etc.) and geologic interpretation of mapped data will be a central focus of laboratory activities. Prerequisite: GEOL 220

GEOL 282 - Introduction to Hydrology

3 s.h.

Investigation of the hydrologic cycle, with emphasis on the flow of surface and ground water; geologic aspects of fluid flow and water supply; hydrologic problems, including pollution, water quality, economics, and water law. Includes independent laboratory work in open-channel and ground-water flow. (LA) Prerequisites: GEOL 120.

 

GEOL 299 - Independent Study in Geology

1-6 s.h.

Individual studies under faculty supervision. Admission by consent of department chair and instructor involved.,LA) Prerequisites: SoS and prior course(s) in GEOL.

GEOL 305 - Mineral Resources and the Environment

3 s.h.

An overview of the basic geologic, engineering, economic, and environmental factors controlling the availability of mineral resources.
Topics will include metallic and non- metallic ores, energy resources, construction and industrial minerals. Examination of the environmental consequences of exploration and development of mineral deposits. Discussion of global mineral reserves and resources. Offered alternate fall semesters. Intended clientele: undergraduate environmental science, geology, water resources, and secondary education earth science majors. (LA)
Cross-Listed as: ENVS 305.  Prerequisite: GEOL 242 or ESCI 215.

 

GEOL 314 - Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology

4 s.h.

The formation of Earth’s most common crustal rocks is explored from both descriptive and theoretical perspectives. Laboratory emphasizes recognition of rock textures and composition in hand samples and thin sections and the interpretation of processes of formation of these features. Physical and chemical processes of rock formation are a major focus of this course.  (LA) Prerequisite: GEOL 242.

 

GEOL 321 - Paleontology

4 s.h.

Fossils are a fundamental component of the rock record and provide the only direct evidence of past life on Earth. Fossils can help solve many geologic and biologic problems of interest, such as the dating of events in the geologic record, interpretation of depositional environments, paleogeography, climate change, the nature of mass extinction, and the history of biodiversity, at a temporal perspective unavailable when studying modern systems. In this course students will learn how to address questions and solve problems related to these topics through lab activities involving hypothesis testing, interactive lectures, presentations, projects, and discussions of the scientific literature.

Prerequisite: Geol 220 or Biol 181

GEOL 330 - Structural Geology

4 s.h.

An introduction to common structural featuresfolds, faults, foliations, lineations, unconformities, geologic contactstheir geometry and origin. Examination of basic concepts of stress and strain; laboratory application of basic geometric techniques used in structural analysis, including orthographic and stereographic projection, construction of cross-sections, and interpretation of structure from geological maps. (LA) Prerequisites: GEOL 220, 222; PHYS103-104 or 203-204 suggested, but not required.

GEOL 331 - Introduction to Engineering Geology

3 s.h.

An introduction to the application of geological principles to geotechnical problems such as slope stability, behaviors of foundations in soil and rock, site selection and characterization for engineering works, and resource extraction. Prerequisites: GEOL 220 and PHYS 103 or 203.

GEOL 333 - Geology of Rocky Mountain Regions

3 s.h.

Multi-week summer field trip instruction and project work; consideration of geologic principles and concepts of rock formation, mountain building, geologic history, and landform interpretation. Travel and camping costs shared by students.,LA) rerequisites: GEOL 120 and permission of instructor. Corequisite: BIOL 333.

GEOL 338 - Coastal Geology in Northeastern North America

3 s.h.

A study of the major geological and ecological processes that have created various coastal environments. How these processes are affected by natural and human forces to modify the environments. Expected length of course: about three weeks. Travel and camping costs are shared by students. Prerequisite: Successful completion of 3 s.h. of college-level eology and permission of instructor. Corequisite: BIOL 338.

GEOL 360 - Sedimentary Geology

4 s.h.

rinciples of sedimentary geology, including stratigraphy and sedimentology. Identification, classification, and correlation of rock units. Also includes use of fossils in interpretation, geophysical methods of correlation, the concepts of facies, basin analysis, interpretation of depositional environments and history.(LA) rerequisites: GEOL 220, 222.

GEOL 370 - Geomorphology

3 s.h.

The study of surface processes and landforms, their origin and development, systems in equilibrium, effects of climate, and underlying rock structures.(LA) Prerequisite: GEOL 220.

GEOL 374 - Glaciology and Glacial Geology

3 s.h.

The study of glaciers, their formation, movement, and physical characteristics; the effects of glaciation on a regional scale, with attention to erosional and depositional features in northeastern U.S. Depositional landforms, and their environments of accumulation and stratigraphic characteristics, are emphasized.,LA, C) rerequisite: GEOL 370.

GEOL 375 Fluvial Geomorphology

3 s.h.

Stream flow, flow frequency, river hydraulics, stream development, sediment transport and storage, channel shape and stability, and landforms associated with rivers are covered. Applications of fluvial principles to river management and stream restoration are emphasized.  The course will meet for two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory activities per week. The course will be taught every even Spring. (LA)  Prerequisites: GEOL 120 and GEOL 220 and GEOL 370

GEOL 380 - Environmental Geophysics

3 s.h.

The application of physical principles to the investigation of the earth. Field work includes the use of the magnetometer, gravimeter, seismometer, and resistivity unit.(LA) Prerequisites: GEOL 120, MTH 173, PHYS 103 or 203.

GEOL 384 - Watershed Management

3 s.h.

Techniques for measurement and analysis of the components of the hydrologic cycle, with application to land use, environmental geology, and water supply. Topics include water-budget studies, hydrograph analysis, flood prediction, land-use and water-supply management, and legal and economic aspects of watershed management.(LA) Prerequisite: GEOL 382.

GEOL 386 - The Geochemistry of Natural Waters

3 s.h.

Chemical aspects of the hydrologic cycle, with emphasis on the interaction of surface and ground water with their geologic environment. Topics include interpretation of dissolved components in water, their sources, equilibria, interactions, and their effect on water quality. Laboratories and a term project involve water sampling, analysis, and interpretation.(LA) Prerequisites: JrS, GEOL 120 and CHEM 112.

GEOL 388 - Applied Hydrology

3 s.h.

Use of quantitative techniques to solve problems in water supply, water management, and hydrologic aspects of geology. Emphasis is on measurement and interpretation of hydrologic variables in ground and surface water. Topics include the prediction of aquifer and well yield, numerical and analog flow models, open-channel hydraulics, pipe flow, and water power.(LA) Prerequisites: GEOL 382 and MATH 173.

GEOL 389 - Groundwater Modeling

3 s.h.

An introduction to numerical and computer methods in groundwater hydrology. Course topics include finite-difference and finite-element techniques, use of professional-level software, field and laboratory methods for obtaining the data needed for aquifer analysis, interpretation of models, how to avoid misinterpreting them, and how to present the data in written and oral form. Field work includes surveying, water-well inventories, geologic interpretation, and pumping tests. Laboratory work includes interpretation of geologic maps and cross sections, computer modeling of various aquifer types, and graphical presentation of results. (LA) Prerequisites: GEOL 382 and MATH 173.

GEOL 390 Geoscience Research Techniques

3 s.h.

The choice and design of research projects are examined in lecture and seminar formats. Techniques employed in geoscience research, including searching and evaluating the primary literature, collecting field data, sampling design and techniques and laboratory analysis of samples are explored in preparation for ESCI 398: Senior Thesis. Scientific writing skills are developed through literature review and preparation of a formal thesis proposal. (LA)  Prerequisites: JrS, 15 s.h. of Geoscience courses.

 

GEOL 394 - Special Topics in Geology

1-3 s.h.

Selected topics of current geological interest not found in other courses. Subject matter varies each time course is offered, reflecting new developments in the field and changing interests of students and staff. Intended for geology majors.,LA) Prerequisites: JrS and prior courses in GEOL.

GEOL 397 - Internship in Geology

1-15 s.h.

Students are placed with an appropriate organization or agency for applied work experience. Requirements and credits vary with individual internships. Prerequisite: passage of CWE.

GEOL 398 - Seminar in Undergraduate Research

1 s.h.

Seminar discussion of ongoing undergraduate research projects. Peer review and commentary on research progress on a weekly basis. Seminar participants will be required to share the results of their research with the department in a public forum. Enrollment by permission of instructor. Prerequisites: 1) Declared major in Earth Sciences Department. 2) Students must be engaged in research under the supervision of a faculty mentor mentors need not be the same as the course instructor). Students who enroll in this seminar may also be eligible for independent study credit in association with their research projects.

GEOL 399 - Independent Study in Geology

1-6 s.h.

Individual studies under faculty supervision. Admission by consent of department chair and instructor involved.,LA) Prerequisites: JrS and prior course(s) in GEOL.


Courses in Meteorology (METR)

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METR 110 - Introduction to Meteorology

The physical processes of the atmosphere as they produce weather phenomena; weather elements, condensation and precipitation processes, air masses, fronts, winds, circulation systems, severe storms; interpretation of weather maps; laboratory experience. (LA, NL2)

METR 180 - Lightning and Thunderstorms

An introductory course for both non-science and science-oriented students who wish to learn about thunderstorms and their associated weather, including lightning, tornadoes, hail, and flash floods. The characteristics of thunderstorms are presented using charts, graphs, and satellite pictures. Open to meteorology majors, but is not part of the major curriculum.  LA, N2)

METR 205 - The Atmospheric Environment

Environmental issues relating to the atmosphere featuring lectures and discussions on topics recently reported in the news. Two 75-minute lectures per week on Greenhouse warming, acid rain, air pollution, drought, and Ozone depletion.,LA). Prerequisites: METR 110 or ENVS 101.

METR 212 - Introduction to Climatology

The nature of different types of climates and the mechanisms producing them. Topics include the atmosphere's energy and hydrologic cycles, global circulations, air masses, monsoons, lake effects, climate classification, and climatic change. Writing in the discipline is empasized.,LA) Prerequisite: METR 110.

METR 290 - Computer and Data Analysis in Meteorology

Application of computers to problems in meteorology. Topics selected from the following: managing meteorological data, generating alogarithms for thermodynamic variables, developing numerical and statistical procedures for weather prediction, modeling and simulation of atmospheric behavior.) Prerequisites: METR 110.

METR 299 - Independent Study in Meteorology

Individual studies under faculty supervision. Admission by consent of department chair and instructor involved.,LA) rerequisites: SoS and prior course(s) in METR.

METR 340 - Physical Meteorology

Fundamental physical principles applied to the atmosphere, including thermodynamics of dry and moist air; hydrostatic equilibrium and stability; radiation.,LA) Prerequisites: METR 110, PHYS 203 an MATH 174.

METR 350 - Atmospheric Dynamics

The study of atmospheric motions in terms of fluid flow concepts, including advection, divergence, vorticity, and circulation. Atmospheric motions are also studied as solutions to the primitive equations. Applications to weather patterns are emphasized.) Prerequisites: METR 340 and MATH 276.Corequisite: METR 360.

METR 351 - Research Methods in Dynamics 

A continuation of METR 350 with further applications of the basic equations to atmospheric motions. Relations between temperature and the wind field, fluid flow theorems, pressure tendency, surfaces of discontinuity, wave motions, and numerical weather prediction.) Prerequisite: METR 350.Corequisite: METR 361.

METR 360 - Weather Analysis and Forecasting I

Synoptic mechanisms as applied to daily weather forecasting. Fundamentals of surface and upper air processes, cyclone formation, and jet stream effects; the use of forecast and diagnostic weather maps. Laboratories involve coding, plotting, and analyzing meteorological data, constructing charts, and forecasting.,LA) Prerequisite: METR 340.Corequisite: METR 350.

METR 361 - Weather Analysis and Forecasting II

Principles given in METR 360 are applied to forecasting of severe weather conditions and use of satellite and radar observations. The construction of computer forecast models is studied for identification of systematic errors. Also covered are lake effect and broadcast meteorology. Laboratories cover specialized forecast techniques and media weather presentation.,LA) Prerequisite: METR 360. Corequisite: METR 351.

METR 375 - Mesoscale Meteorology

This course focuses on atmospheric processes that occur in the mesoscale using both a qualitative and quantitative approach. Topics include severe storm analysis, topographical effects, local circulations, phenomena associated with fronts and the evolution and morphology of hurricanes.

METR 380 - Atmospheric Radiative Transfer

Intended for meteorology majors.  The physical processes of absorption and scattering of solar radiation and absorption and emission of terrestrial radiation will be applied to the atmosphere.  Further study of these processes as applied to remote sensing systems will follow.  Finally, the computational aspects of radiative processes as applied in climate change and general circulation models will be covered.

METR 385 - Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere

Intended for meteorology majors, this course will familiarize students with current atmospheric remote sensing technology and theory. Included are satellite images, wind profiler data, lightning detection and radar, including Doppler Radar Theory and image interpretation. This is a non-lab course, but exercises using current and archived images will be performed. Juniors and Seniors should take this course.,LA) Prerequisite: METR 360.

METR 392 - Senior Seminar in Meteorology

Intended as a capstone course for Meteorology majors.  Review recent developments in science, procedure, forecasting, and policy in the field of meteorology with class presentations and discussion.

METR 394 - Special Topics in Meteorology

Selected topics of current meteorological interest not found in other courses. Subject matter varies each time course is offered, reflecting new developments in the field and changing interests of students and staff. Intended for meteorology majors.,LA) Prerequisites: JrS and prior course(s) in METR.

METR 397 - Internship in Meteorology

Students are placed with an appropriate organization or agency for applied work experience. Requirements and credits vary with individual internships. Prerequisite: passage of CWE.

METR 399 - Independent Study in Meteorology

Individual studies under faculty supervision. Admission by consent of department chair and instructor involved.,LA) Prerequisites: JrS and prior course(s) in METR.


Courses in Oceanography (OCEA)

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OCEA 210 - General Oceanography

A broad survey of our oceans, including general bottom topography and geology; chemistry salts, nutrients, pollutants; physics (waves, currents, tides); meteorological effects (heat budget, global circulation, climates); and biology (environments, food pyramids, marine adaptations). (LA)
Prerequisite: ESCI 100 or GEOL 120 or 115, 150, 182 or METR 110.

Courses in Earth Science

ESCI 100 - Introduction to the Earth

3 s.h.

An introduction to the earth sciences; concepts developed in astronomy, geology, geophysics, meteorology, and oceanography. Lecture only. Credit cannot be applied toward science requirement in any science major in Liberal Arts or Secondary Education. Students who have had high school earth science should consider other introductory earth science classes.,LA, N2)

ESCI 200 - Investigations in Earth and Planetary Science

3 s.h.

An exploration of science as inquiry, focusing on the unifying concepts and processes of science as applied to planet Earth. The specific Earch Science content from the K-4 and 5-8 levels of the National Science Education Standards NRC 1996) will be rigorously and comprehensively explored. Laboratory activities will model science as inquiry, with students engaged in a variety of directed and open-ended investigations of selected Earth and planetary science phenomena and topics. This course is intended primarily for Elementary Education majors, but is open to all students. Content and instruction are consistent with the NSES, NSTA Standards and New York's MST Learning Standards. Prerequisite: SoS,LA, NL2)

ESCI 214 Principles of Soil Science

3 s.h.

Introduction to the principles of soil science to gain an understanding of soils as natural resources and integral components of the terrestrial environment. Focus on fundamental physical, chemical and biological properties of soils and processes governing formation, development and differentiation. Labs will focus on practical experiences in soil classification and analyses. A 2-day weekend field trip is mandatory.

ESCI 215 Earth Materials

3 s.h.

This course provides an overview of the physical and chemical properties,
origins, and geologic settings of the major categories of earth materials: minerals, rocks, and geofluids. It includes development of hands-on skills in mineral and rock identification and textural analysis at hand-specimen scale. It is intended for liberal arts Earth Science, Adolescent Education., LA

ESCI 257 Global Climate Change

3 s.h

This course is an introduction to the scientific evidence for human-induced climate change, the natural variability of our climate system against which changes are assessed, and the impacts on the natural world and the predicted response of Earth’s ecosystems. It also focuses on the economic and policy proposals and debates about how humanity needs to respond. At the end of the course, students will present a research symposium on current issues in climate change, impacts and adaptations and efforts to mitigate human influence. 

ESCI 290 - Waste Management

3 s.h.

An introduction to the basic scientific, technical, and regulatory aspects of waste management. Includes an overview of all categories of waste options available to manage various wastes and environmental issues tied to waste management. Writing in the discipline is emphasized.,LA) Cross-listed as ENVS 290.

ESCI 294 - Special Topics in Earth Science

1-3 s.h.

Selected topics of current geological interest not found in other courses. Subject matter will vary each time the course is offered, reflecting new developments in the field and changing interests of the students and staff. Intended for students majoring in any of the Earth Sciences disciplines or in the Environmental Sciences.,LA) Prerequisites: SoS, prior courses in Earth Sciences or Environmental Sciences.

ESCI 295 - Teaching Assistantship in Earth Science

1-2 s.h.

Provides college-level experience as an assistant to the teaching faculty. Student assistants will serve directly under faculty supervision, with responsibilities such as tutoring, as well as assistance in laboratory classes, review sessions, field trips, laboratory set-up, and administration of classroom functions e.g., taking attendance, setting up AV facilities). The teaching assistantship may be repeated as ESCI 395, but with a 3-credit maximum combined total for both courses. Credit can be applied toward earth science elective categories. Prerequisites: JrS or SrS, major in an Earth Sciences field, minimum GPA 2.5, permission of instructor and chair.

ESCI 299 - Independent Study in Earth Science

1-6 s.h.

Individual studies under faculty supervision. Admission by consent of department chair and instructor involved.,LA) Prerequisites: SoS and prior course(s) in earth sciencs.

ESCI 315 - Laboratory Techniques in Earth Science

2 s.h.

The selection, preparation, maintenance, and proper use of laboratory equipment and supplies in earth science; application of technologies in the earth science laboratory, practice in developing demonstrations and presentation of topics; planning of inquiry-based laboratory exercises. Corequisite: SCIN 315.Prerequisites: JrS and 6 s.h. in approved earth sciences.

ESCI 323 Global Biogeochemistry

4 s.h.

Introduction to the study of the chemical, physical, biological and geological processes and reactions that govern the composition of the natural environment. Focus on cycles of matter and energy that transport Earth’s components in time and space. Concepts from Atmospheric Sciences, Biology, Ecology, Chemistry, Geology and Soil Science. Lecture and lab weekly. Labs will focus on student presentation and discussion of case studies. Cross-Listed as ENVS 323. Prerequisite: GEOL 386.

 

ESCI 394 - Special Topics in Earth Science

1-4 s.h.

Selected topics in areas of Earth Science in which recent advances have occurred and are not covered adequately in other courses. Subject matter is taught by one or more Earth Science faculty members and varies in content. Intended for Earth Science majors of SoS or higher.,LA)

ESCI 395 - Teaching Assistantship in Earth Science

1-2 s.h.

Provides college-level experience as an assistant to the teaching faculty. Student assistants will serve directly under faculty supervision, with responsibilities such as tutoring, as well as assistance in laboratory classes, review sessions, field trips, laboratory set-up, and administration of classroom functions e.g., taking attendance, setting up AV facilities). There is a 3-credit maximum combined total for ESCI 295 and ESCI 395. Credit can be applied toward earth science elective categories. Prerequisites: JrS or SrS, major in an Earth Sciences fied, minimum GPA 2.5, permission of instructor and chair, ESCI 295.

ESCI 396 - Seminar in Environmental Earth Science

1-4 s.h.

Designed to familiarize majors in the Earth Sciences disciplines including Environmental Earth Science, Earth Science, Geology, Meteorology, Oceanography, and Water Resources) with current issues and developments in their field by reading, discussion, written reports, and oral presentations with active involvement by all participants.,LA) Prerequisites: enrollment by consent of department chair ad instructor involved. Passing grade on CWE.

ESCI 397 - Internship in Environmental Earth Sciences

1-15 s.h.

Students are placed with an appropriate organization or agency for applied work experience. Requirements and credits vary with individual internships. Prerequisite: passing grade on CWE.

ESCI 398 - Senior Thesis in Earth Sciences

2-4 s.h.

Individual research under faculty supervision in disciplines of environmental sciences, geology, water resources, meteorology, or oceanography. Enrollment by consent of department chair and instructor involved. A thesis is likely to require more than one semester to complete.,LA) rerequisites: SrS, submission and acceptance of a formal thesis proposal during the semester or summer prior to enrollment, and a minimum 3.2 GPA in the major.

ESCI 399 - Independent Study in Earth Science

1-6 s.h.

Individual studies under faculty supervision. Admission by consent of department chair and instructor involved.,LA) Prerequisites: JrS and prior courses in earth science.

 

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