SUNY Oneonta

 

 
 

Program Assessment

 
 
  • 2012-2013 Program Assessment Checklist

  • 2011-2012 Program Assessment Checklist

  • Click to download the Chemistry Program Assessment Plan


    SUNY College at Oneonta-Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry
    Adopted May 9, 2011
    (contact the department chair for information regarding data gathered via the plan)

    Program Goal:
    Each student will demonstrate the ability to function as a working chemist and engage in scientific problem solving based on a comprehensive understanding of fundamental chemical concepts.
    Student Learning Outcomes:
    The following are specific goals for students majoring in chemistry, the study of the composition of matter and the changes it undergoes. The relationship of each goal to American Chemical Society guidelines is also included (Undergraduate Professional Education in Chemistry: ACS Guidelines and Evaluation Procedures for Bachelor's Degree Programs, American Chemical Society Committee on Professional Training, 2008).
    Table 1- Student Learning Outcomes


    #

    Goal

    Relevant ACS Guidelines

    1

    Students will demonstrate an understanding of chemical elements and inorganic compounds, their properties, reactions and uses.

    5.2, 5.3, 5.4, 5.5

    2

    Students will demonstrate an understanding of organic compounds, their properties, reactions and uses.

    5.3, 5.4, 5.5

    3

    Students will demonstrate an understanding of what controls chemical stability and reactivity, reaction kinetics and how to detect and analyze chemical reactions.

    5.2, 5.3, 5.4, 5.5

    4

    Students will learn and practice basic laboratory safety and chemical hygiene procedures.

    5.2, 5.5, 7.3

    5

    Students will exhibit a working knowledge of classical and modern analytical techniques and instrumentation, and understand their uses and limitations.

    4.2, 5.2, 5.5, 7.1, 7.2

    6

    Students will gain experience in the use of computers for chemical simulation and computation, data acquisition, and data analysis.

    4.2, 4.3, 5.4, 5.5, 7.1

    7

    Students will demonstrate knowledge of the models chemists use to understand matter and energy at the atomic, molecular and macromolecular dimensions.

    4.3, 5.2, 5.3, 5.4, 5.5, 7.2

    8

    Students will exhibit an understanding of the process of science as inquiry, including the role of collaboration and the evolving nature of scientific knowledge as it applies to chemistry.

    4.4, 5.4, 5.5, 7.2, 7.5

    9

    Students will demonstrate competence in analytical thinking and critical analysis of chemical literature.

    5.3, 5.4, 7.1, 7.2

    10

    Students will demonstrate effective oral and written communication.

    7.1, 7.2, 7.4

  • Table 2 Curriculum Map - Click for Larger Image

  • Assessment Plan:
    Assessment of student learning outcomes will be done in the Chemistry and Biochemistry department's capstone course, Senior Seminar (CHEM 398). Effective as of the 2012-2013 academic year, this two-credit course will be offered in the spring semester, since most of our majors complete their degree program at this time. Thus, students will have completed the majority of the program requirements before learning outcomes are assessed.
    Table 3- Three-year schedule for assessment of learning outcomes


    Year 1

    Outcomes 2, 6, and 9 (organic, computation, analytical thinking and critical analysis of chemical literature)

    Year 2

    Outcomes 1, 4, 5, and 8 (inorganic, safety, analytical chemistry and instrumentation, scientific inquiry and collaboration)

    Year 3

    Outcomes 3, 7, and 10 (control of stability/reactivity, understanding of models, oral and written communication)

    Learning outcomes will be evaluated on the three-year schedule presented in Table 3. Assessments will consist of various tasks, which may include the following: experiment design, group projects, literature review and analysis, oral presentations, poster presentations, problem sets, and quizzes/exams. At least two faculty members will design each task and create the guidelines for evaluation of student work. Faculty members whose area of expertise best fits the outcome being evaluated will design the corresponding task (see the directory in Table 4, following page). In order to account for staffing changes, this directory will be updated on a yearly basis at the beginning of the fall semester. There are currently no plans to assess student perceptions of the program, although our response to initial rounds of SLO assessment may include assessment of student perceptions.
    The senior seminar instructor will compile and aggregate assessment data. A written report on the assessment of each outcome in that year's schedule will be provided to the department. The report will include both strengths and weaknesses revealed by the assessment. After discussion of assessment outcomes at a regular department meeting, any recommendations for changes to department curricula or objectives will be recorded in the department minutes. The department chair will be responsible for ensuring that recommended changes be enacted.

    Table 4- Faculty Expertise Mapped to Student Learning Outcomes: 2011-2012


    #

    Student Learning Outcome

    Faculty with Expertise

    1

    Students will demonstrate an understanding of chemical elements and inorganic compounds, their properties, reactions and uses.

    Schaumloffel, Thomas-Smith, Vining,

    2

    Students will demonstrate an understanding of organic compounds, their properties, reactions and uses.

    Armstrong, Bennett, Bishop

    3

    Students will demonstrate an understanding of what controls chemical stability and reactivity, reaction kinetics and how to detect and analyze chemical reactions.

    Chiang, Gallagher, Green

    4

    Students will learn and practice basic laboratory safety and chemical hygiene procedures.

    Bishop, Schaumloffel, Thomas-Smith, Vining,

    5

    Students will exhibit a working knowledge of classical and modern analytical techniques and instrumentation, and understand their uses and limitations.

    Bennett, Schaumloffel, Thomas-Smith

    6

    Students will gain experience in the use of computers for chemical simulation and computation, data acquisition, and data analysis.

    Bennett, Chiang, Gallagher, Schaumloffel, Thomas-Smith

    7

    Students will demonstrate knowledge of the models chemists use to understand matter and energy at the atomic, molecular and macromolecular dimensions.

    Chiang, Gallagher, Vining

    8

    Students will exhibit an understanding of the process of science as inquiry, including the role of collaboration and the evolving nature of scientific knowledge as it applies to chemistry.

    All department faculty members (The senior seminar instructor and 1-2 other individuals of his/her choice will design the specific assessment measures for a given year.)

    9

    Students will demonstrate competence in analytical thinking and critical analysis of chemical literature.

    10

    Students will demonstrate effective oral and written communication.

    ACS guideline Section 4 relates to infrastructure, Section 5 to curriculum, and Section 7 to the development of student skills.