Biology Course Description

 
 

By Course Number

Below are a listing of all courses available at the College of Oneonta Biology Department. Not all courses are offered every semester and the Registrar's office should be contacted for availability. The courses listed below are in order of course number.

Link to Graduate Courses (500 and 600 level).

BIOL 100 Modern Biology

BIOL 101 Plant Biology

BIOL 123 Introduction to Evolution

BIOL 180 General Biology I

BIOL 184 Introduction to Aquatic Biology

BIOL 194 Special Topics

BIOL 196 Directed Research I

BIOL 199 Independent Study in Biology

BIOL 200 General Biology II

BIOL 201 General Biology III

BIOL 202 Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology

BIOL 203 Elementary Microbiology

BIOL 204 Genome Project Implications

BIOL 205 Human Anatomy and Physiology I

BIOL 206 Human Anatomy and Physiology II

BIOL 207 Biology of Cancer

BIOL 212 Genetics

BIOL 216 Evolution

BIOL 220 Economic Botany

BIOL 231 Physiology of Exercise

BIOL 232 Plant Anatomy

BIOL 236 Vascular Plants Systematics

BIOL 238 Natural History of Woody Plants

BIOL 244 A Natural History of Insects

BIOL 250 Natural History of Vertebrates

BIOL 252 Ornithology

BIOL 259 Marine Biology

BIOL 265 Evolution of Biology

BIOL 282 Ecology

BIOL 284 Wetland Science

BIOL 294 Special Topics

BIOL 295 Teaching Assistantship

BIOL 296 Directed Research II

BIOL 298 Undergraduate Seminar

BIOL 299 Independent Study in Biology

BIOL 311 Human Genetics

BIOL 312 DNA Laboratory

BIOL 315 Laboratory Techniques in Biology

BIOL 317 Biological Literacy

BIOL 320 Field Botany

BIOL 321 Tropical Biology Field Course

BIOL 333 Ecology of Rocky Mountain Regions

BIOL 338 Coastal Ecology in Northeastern North America

BIOL 340 Molecular Biology

BIOL 342 Invertebrate Zoology

BIOL 346 Parasitology

BIOL 350 Immunology

BIOL 351 Biology of Fish

BIOL 356 Animal Behavior

BIOL 362 Microbiology

BIOL 367 Aquatic Pollution

BIOL 369 Methods in Population Genetics

BIOL 370 General Physiology

BIOL 373 Plant Growth and Development

BIOL 380 Cell Biology

BIOL 381 Plant Ecology

BIOL 383 Wetlands & Delineation

BIOL 384 Aquatic Invertebrate Ecology

BIOL 385 Limnology

BIOL 386 Seminar in Conservation Biology

BIOL 387 Field Parasitology

BIOL 388 Stream Ecology

BIOL 394 Special Topics

BIOL 395 Teaching Assistantship

BIOL 396 Directed Research III

BIOL 397 Internship in Biology

BIOL 398 Undergraduate Seminar

BIOL 399 Independent Study in Biology

INTD 214 Aggression in Man and Animals

Notes

BIOL 100 Modern Biology 3 s.h.

Acquaints students with fundamental biological concepts and illustrates
the application of these principles to everyday life. Emphasizes
the relationship of human biology to evolution, the environment,
health and biotechnology. This course is for non-majors. Lecture
and laboratory.(LA, NL2)
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BIOL 101 Plant Biology 3 s.h.

Develops biological principles through study of plants. Topics include
plant structure, classification, growth, reproduction, systematics, and
diversity. The laboratory uses microscopic techniques to examine
plant anatomy and other modern techniques to study basic plant
physiology, systematics, and diversity. No major field credit for
biology majors.
(LA, N, T)

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BIOL 123 Introduction to Evolution 3 s.h.
This course will introduce the student to the processes and mechanisms
that cause evolutionary change. Topics covered will include:
the historical development of the theory of evolution; the process of
evolution through natural selection, adaptation and fitness; evolution
of plant and animal diversity, including human evolution; and
modern controversial issues associated with evolution. No major
field credit for biology major. (LA, N2)

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BIOL 180 General Biology I 4 s.h.
This is the first course in a three-semester introductory sequence.
Topics to be covered include scientific methodology, macro- and
microevolution, behavior, ecology, biodiversity and conservation,
Medelian genetics and microorganisms. Recommended only for
Biology majors or students who will continue studies in biologyrelated
or health-related disciplines. Lecture and Laboratory.
(LA, NL2)

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BIOL 184 Introduction to Aquatic Biology 3 s.h.

The ecology and general biology of freshwater environments, with
emphasis on benthic invertebrates and life histories of aquatic species.
Usually for high school students. (LA)
Prerequisite: NYS Regents Biology or equivalent.
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BIOL 194 Special Topics 1-4 s.h.

BIOL 194 Special Topics 1-4 s.h.
Experiences of variable length and subject matter offered on- or
off-campus, or at the Biological Field Station. Costs shared by
students. (LA)
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
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BIOL 196 Directed Research 1 s.h.

Directed research and training with faculty supervision to develop,
carry out and report on a module of research. Intended for students
with no prior experience in research. Students may work as part of
a team with other students at various academic levels on campus, in
the field, or at the Biological Field Station. Experiences may include
research methods, data collection, exposure to field or laboratory
instrumentation and the development of communication skills.
Directed research at the Biological Field Station is competitive and
typically conducted for 10 weeks in the summer, 36 hours per week.
Sponsored research may include a stipend or other monetary award.
No major field credit for biology majors.

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BIOL 199 Independent Study in Biology 1-6 s.h.

BIOL 199 Independent Study in Biology 1-6 s.h.
Under the guidance of faculty members, students pursue projects
that do not fit within the framework of regular course offerings.
Open to students doing work at the freshman level. Applicability
of LA credit determined when project is identified.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
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BIOL 200 General Biology II 4 s.h.

Covers structure and function of plants, especially flowering plants,
including anatomy, morphology, physiology, evolution, and life histories.
Also studies the major groups of animals emphasizing “type”
animals in each phylum. Classical principles are presented in a case
history approach. Representatives of the major phyla are studied
using both the microscope and dissection techniques. Lecture and
laboratory. (LA)
Prerequisite: BIOL 180 or ENVS 101.
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BIOL 201 General Biology III 4 s.h.

Lecture provides an introduction to biological models and their
roles in carrying out cell functions. Key cellular processes such as
respiration, photosynthesis, assembly of proteins, and cell division
are presented. The laboratory uses modern techniques to study
enzyme action, to grow and observe living cells, and to analyze cell
structures. (LA)
Prerequisite: BIOL 200.
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BIOL 202 Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology 3 s.h.

This lecture course is designed to introduce students to the structure,
organization, and functioning of the human organism. Some common
diseases and injuries will be described. Recent brain research
and its impact on child development will be discussed. No major
field credit for Biology majors. (LA)
Prerequisite: BIOL 100.

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BIOL 203 Elementary Microbiology 3 s.h.

Designed for non-biology majors. Discussion of bacterial cell
structure, bacterial biochemistry, bacterial genetics, viral replication
cycles, microbial ecology, eukaryotic microbial life cycles, and
vertebrate host defense mechanisms. Laboratory emphasizes bacterial
culturing, staining, and biochemical analysis. No major field credit
for biology majors. (LA)
Prerequisites: BIOL 100 and CHEM 111.
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BIOL 204 Genome Project Implications 3 s.h.
Examination of the ethical, legal, social, and moral implications of
the Human Genome Project. Topics include eugenics, genetic counseling,
forensics, gene therapy, and genetically modified organisms.
Lecture/discussion format utilizing outside readings, case studies,
films, and debates. Offered annually. (LA)
Prerequisite: BIOL 180.

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BIOL 205 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4 s.h.

This course provides an introduction to the anatomy and physiology
of the human body. The integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous,
and endocrine systems are studied during lecture and laboratory
sessions. Designed for students in health professions, but open to
others. To receive credit for BIOL 205 in the major field, the sequel
course BIOL 206 must also be taken. (LA)
Prerequisite: BIOL 200 and CHEM 111.
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BIOL 206 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4 s.h.

BIOL 206 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4 s.h.
This course is a continuation of BIOL 205. The cardiovascular, immune,
respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems are
covered in lecture and laboratory sessions. Designed for students in
health professions, but open to others. (LA)
Prerequisite: BIOL 205.
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BIOL 207 Biology of Cancer 3 s.h.
Examination of the environmental causes of cancer, the underlying
genetic and cellular changes that lead to a cancer diagnosis, and new
strategies for treatments. (LA)
Prerequisite: BIOL 100.
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BIOL 212 Genetics 4 s.h.

Broad coverage of genetics from the classical period through recent
molecular genetics; discussion of nature, transmission, arrangement,
and function of genetic material. Recombinant DNA technology.
Laboratories require out-of-class time. (LA)
Prerequisite: BIOL 201.
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BIOL 216 Evolution 3 s.h.
Fundamentals of organic evolution, emphasizing natural selection,
competition, speciation, variation, genetics, and human evolution.
Prerequisites: BIOL 200. (LA)
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BIOL 220 Economic Botany 3 s.h.

Study of plants that are economically important to people, including
plants that are sources of food, fibers, medicines, gums, insecticides,
etc. Preparation of term paper and one weekend field trip
required. (LA)
Prerequisite: BIOL 101 or BIOL 200.
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BIOL 231 Physiology of Excercise 3 s.h.
An introduction to how the anatomy and physiology of the human
body are changed by exercise. The effects of acute and chronic physical
activity on the metabolism of the body, and the muscular, nervous,
cardiovascular, and respitory systems will be covered. Responses and
adaptations to temperature extremes, hypobaric, hyperbaric, and
microgravity environments will be included. Includes laboratory.
Offered spring only.
Prerequisite: BIOL 202 or BIOL 205

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BIOL 232 Plant Anatomy 3 s.h.
Examines cell types, tissue systems, and the comparative anatomy
of plant organs with emphasis on Angiosperm anatomy. Includes
laboratory and research projects. Offered spring semester. (LA)
Prerequisite: BIOL 200.

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BIOL 236 Vascular Plant Systematics 4 s.h.

Identification and classification of vascular plants emphasizing family characteristics. Major Pteridophyte, Gymnosperm, and Angiosperm families are studied in lecture and laboratory formats.
(LA)
Prerequisite - BIOL 105.
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BIOL 238 Natural History of Woody Plants 3 s.h.
A course to explore the identification, ecology and cultural aspects
of trees and shrubs. Growth habit, structure and function of wood,
reproduction, environmental relationships, and some human uses
will be studied. Laboratories will emphasize identification of regional
species. One weekend field trip may be required. (LA)
Prerequisite: BIOL 200.
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BIOL 244 A Natural History of Insects 4 s.h.

A biology of insects including their natural history, anatomy, and
functional morphology. Classification and ecology of forms found
locally. Preparation of collections; field and laboratory experiences;
term paper required. (LA)
Prerequisite: 6 s.h. of BIOL.
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BIOL 250 Natural History of Vertebrates 3 s.h.

The biology of vertebrate animals, including evolution, classification,
and behavior of all major classes. Laboratories stress structural features,
while field trips emphasize ecology, behavior, and identification
of local forms. Three mandatory all-day Saturday field trips. (LA)
Prerequisite: BIOL 200.
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BIOL 252 Ornithology 3 s.h.
Lectures provide an introduction to the scientific study of birds,
covering everything from anatomy and physiology through evolution,
classification and behavior. Indoor and outdoor labs will emphasize
adaptive morphology as well as identification, ecology and natural
history of local species. Students are required to attend a weekend
field trip and also two Sunday excursions.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200

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BIOL 259 Marine Biology 3 s.h.

The ecology and general biology of the marine biota. Stresses life
histories and trophic relationships, adaptations for marine life, and
limitations imposed by marine environments. (LA)
Prerequisite: BIOL 200 or OCEA 210.
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BIOL 265 Evolution of Biology 3 s.h.
A brief look at how the study of biology has changed over time,
from prehistoric man to the 21st century. Emphasis will be given to
developments in techniques, instruments, thought processes and
information sharing. Students will research individual projects and
complete a series of writing assignments. (LA, WS2)
Prerequisite: BIOL 200.

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BIOL 282 Ecology 4 s.h.

Interrelations between organisms and their environments at the
population, community, and ecosystem levels; laboratory and field
exercises cover population dynamics, productivity, and community
structure in aquatic and terrestrial environments. (LA)
Prerequisites: BIOL 200.
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BIOL 284 Wetland Science 4 s.h.
Introduction to wetland science. Focus on wetland history, use and
classification. Introduces wetland definitions and their unique properties
and functions. Focus on understanding the wetland environment;
hydrology, soils, biological adaptations. Lecture and lab per week.
Labs will emphasize practical experiences in understanding wetland
functional properties. A 2-day weekend field trip is mandatory.
Cross-Listed as ENVS 284.
Prerequisites: ENVS 101 or GEOL 182.
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BIOL 294 Special Topics 1-4 s.h.

This course gives students the opportunity to study in depth advanced
and special topics in the field of biology. Topics and instructors will
be announced prior to registration. (LA)
Prerequisites: SoS and BIOL 200.
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BIOL 295 Teaching Assistantship 3 s.h.

BIOL 295 Teaching Assistantship 1 s.h.
Provides college-level experience in teaching, laboratory design, and
preparation in a 100-level Biology course. Students works directly
under a laboratory instructor of the course. Activities may include
laboratory exercise presentations, setting up and dismantling of lab
materials, and tutoring. Credit for BIOL 295 may not be applied
toward the requirements for the Biology major or minor. Graded
on pass/fail basis only.
Prerequisites: CWE 1, one SUNY Oneonta biology course and
meet minimum requirements stipulated on the campus teaching
assistantship application.
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BIOL 296 Directed Research II 1 s.h.
Directed research and training with faculty supervision to develop,
carry out and report on a module of research. Intended for students
with little prior experience in research, but who have had a year of
college-level sciences. Students may work as part of a team with
other students at various academic levels on campus, in the field, or
at the Biological Field Station. Experiences may include research
methods, project proposals or grant development, data collection,
exposure to field or laboratory instrumentation and the development
of communication skills. Directed research at the Biological Field
Station is competitive and typically conducted for 10 weeks in the
summer, 36 hours per week. Sponsored research may include a stipend
or other monetary award. No major field credit for biology majors.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200.

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BIOL 298 Undergraduate Seminar 1-4 s.h.

BIOL 298 Undergraduate Seminar 1-4 s.h.
Reports, discussions, lectures, and library research on current topics
in specific fields of science. Cannot apply more than 2 s.h. of seminar
to biology elective requirement. (LA)
Prerequisites: 3 s.h. BIOL and permission of instructor.
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BIOL 299 Independent Study in Biology 1-6 s.h.
Under the guidance of faculty members, students pursue projects
that do not fit within the framework of regular biology course offerings.
Open to students at the upper undergraduate and graduate
levels. Cannot apply more than 3 s.h. to biology elective requirement.
Applicability of LA credit determined when project is identified.
Prerequisites: advanced standing and departmental permission.
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BIOL 311 Human Genetics 3 s.h.

Biological basis for human heredity. Course will examine the transmission
of traits in human lineages (pedigree analysis), the molecular
basis for genetic disease (molecular genetics), chromosomal defects
(cytogenetics), and genetic variation in populations (population
genetics). Current topics such as the human genome project, cloning
and stem cell research, DNA forensics, and gene therapy will
be discussed. (LA)
Prerequisite: BIOL 212.
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BIOL 312 DNA Laboratory 3 s.h.
Introduction to DNA laboratory methods applicable to the study
of gene structure and function, forensic analysis, genetic testing,
bioinformatics, genome analysis and nanobiology. Course will
review DNA chemistry and highlight topics of interest featuring
DNA. Project-based labs will provide experience with DNA
sequencing, DNA analysis software and reporter gene detection.
Offered alternate years.
Prerequisite: BIOL 212.
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BIOL 315 Lab Techniques in Biology 2 s.h.
The selection, preparation, maintenance, and proper use of laboratory
equipment and supplies in biology; application of technologies in
the biology laboratory, practice in developing demonstrations and
presentation of topics; planning of inquiry-based laboratory exercises.
Field trip may be required in which students share the costs.
Corequisite: SCIN 315.

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BIOL317 Biological Literacy 3 s.h.
An intensive Scientific Literacy course designed to better prepare
students for comprehending, critically analyzing, and writing papers
for the Biological Sciences. Students will be required to read papers
from a variety of subfields within biology, learn about the common
elements and pitfalls. Students will also practice crafting journalstyle
papers to better familiarize themselves with the format. This
course is reading and writing intensive. (LA, WS2)
Prerequisite: BIOL 200.
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BIOL 320 Field Botany 3 s.h.
Botanical field techniques, the vegetation of North America, and
the flora of Upstate New York. Terminology of description, use
of taxonomic keys, techniques of specimen preservation, field
recognition of plant taxa and communities and controlling ecological
factors, economic and wildlife significance of dominant taxa,
principles of classification and nomenclature. Two weekend field
trips required. Two hours of lecture and three hours lab per week.
Lab format will include individual or small group projects including
a plant collection. (LA)
Prerequisites: BIOL 200, and 3 s.h. of 200-level BIOL.

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BIOL 321 Tropical Biology Field Course 3 s.h.
An intensive and exciting learning experience based at a field station
in a Latin American tropical rain forest. Covers ecology, conservation
and natural history of tropical plants and animals. Includes
rain forest hikes, group and independent field research projects and
evening lectures. Students must be physically fit, enthusiastic about
wildlife and of junior standing. Assessment is based on a written
examination, scientific report writing and oral presentations. Students
must cover cost of flight and room and board.
Prerequisites: JrS and BIOL 200.

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BIOL 333 Ecology of Rocky Mountain Regions 3 s.h.

Three-four week field trip instruction and project work; consideration
of ecological principles and concepts of ecosystem functioning in
major life zones of the region, including identification of major plant
and animal components in each. Costs shared by students.
Prerequisites: 3 s.h. BIOL and permission of the instructors.
Corequisite: GEOL 333.
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BIOL 338 Coastal Ecology in Northeastern North America 3 s.h.

A three- to four-week study of the eastern seaboard’s terrestrial and
marine flora and fauna. Examines the interaction of physical and
chemical processes with these organisms in estuaries, rocky intideral
zones, sandy shores, tidal marshes, barrier dunes, and maritime
forests. Journal and report required. (LA)
Prerequisites: one 3 s.h. BIOL course, and minimum of 9 s.h. in
Science, and permission of instructor.
Corequisite: GEOL 338, 3 s.h.
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BIOL 340 Molecular Biology 4 s.h.

Discussion of the organization and expression of genes in prokaryotes
and eukaryotes, with emphasis on the mechanisms of transcription,
RNA processing and translation. Laboratory emphasizes nucleic
acid isolation and analysis. (LA)
Prerequisite: BIOL 201.
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BIOL 342 Invertebrate Zoology 4 s.h.
The classification, evolution, anatomy and functional morphology of
invertebrate phyla; natural history of forms found locally. Emphasizes
laboratory experiences with preserved and living specimens and dissections.
Field trips to a variety of habitats will be offered. Students
will be strongly encouraged to attend the one or two overnight field
trips that will be offered. Writing assignments required. (LA)
Prerequisite: BIOL 200.

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BIOL 346 Parasitology 4 s.h.
This course will focus on the biology, life cycles, and identification
of protozoan and metazoan parasites of humans and other animals.
Emphasis will be placed on groups of particular medical and/or
economic importance, and on species parasitizing wildlife locally.
Field trip(s) included. (LA)
Prerequisite: BIOL 200.

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BIOL 350 Immunology 3 s.h.

This course will examine the mammalian immunological defense
system. Topics covered include origin and development of the humoral
and cellular immune responses, normal immune responses to
pathogens, and health problems associated with over-reaction and
under-reaction of the immune system. (LA)
Prerequisite: BIOL 201.
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BIOL 351 Biology of Fish 3 s.h.
The major groups of fishes are covered with an emphasis on freshwater
species. General biology, natural history, distribution, systematics,
reproduction, evolution, ecology, and economic importance of fish
are covered in lecture, field, and laboratory formats. Handling and
collection of live fish and use of preserved fish will be necessary.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200.

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BIOL 356 Animal Behavior 4 s.h.

Introduction to zoological study of animal behavior. Topics include
communication, behavior, social organization, and human ethology.
Behavioral observations are emphasized in the laboratory. (LA)
Prerequisites: BIOL 200 and one (200-level) BIOL lab course.

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BIOL 362 Microbiology 4 s. h.

Discussion of bacterial cell structure, bacterial biochemistry, bacterial
genetics, viral replication cycles, microbial ecology, eukaryotic microbial
life cycles, and vertebrate host defense mechanisms. Laboratory
emphasizes bacterial culturing, staining, and biochemical analysis.
Prerequisite: BIOL 201.

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BIOL 367 Aquatic Pollution 3 s.h.

A study of the major pollutants in the environment, with major
emphasis on water pollution. Laboratory provides practical experience
in pollution analysis. (LA)
Prerequisites: CHEM 112, and BIOL 200.
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BIOL 369 Methods in Population Genetics 4 s.h.
Through lecture, case studies, and hands-on laboratory experience,
students will learn to design and perform experiments in population
genetics. Factors favoring specific choice of organism, study
question, molecular marker(s), laboratory techniques and analysis
methods will be discussed. In the laboratory, students will perform
all aspects of a population genetics study.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200.

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BIOL 370 General Physiology 3 s.h.

Basic functional features of living matter, including energy transformations,
excitability, transmission, and response in tissue, and
mechanics of movement. Includes laboratory. (LA)
Prerequisites: BIOL 200 and CHEM 221 or CHEM 226.
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BIOL 373 Plant Growth and Development 3 s.h.

Study of the growth and development of higher plants, emphasizing
the influence of plant growth hormones and plant tissue culture.
Laboratory covers plant tissue culture techniques. (LA)
Prerequisites: BIOL 200 and CHEM 221 or CHEM 226.
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BIOL 380 Cell Biology 3 s.h.

The general biology of eukaryotic cells is studied. Emphasis is on the
ultrastructure, function, metabolism, and controlling mechanism in
these cells. Lecture and laboratory experiences are included. (LA)
Prerequisite: BIOL 201.
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BIOL 381 Plant Ecology 3 s.h.

The interaction of plants with their environments, emphasizing terrestrial
and wetland plant communities. Analyses of regional plant
communities are made using a variety of sampling methods. One
weekend field trip required. (LA)
Prerequisite: BIOL 282.
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BIOL 383 Wetlands & Delineation 4 s.h.

Introduction to wetlands environments. Focus on understanding
concepts of wetlands and methods for identifying, describing,
classifying and delineating wetlands in the USA using State and
Federal criteria. Use of key indicators to focus on soils, hydrology
and vegetation to gain understanding of wetland development and
their significance in the natural world. Lecture and lab weekly. Labs
will emphasize wetland identification and classification. (LA)
Cross-Listed as ENVS 383.
Prerequisites: BIOL 282 or ENVS 284 or GEOL 282, JrS.
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BIOL 384 Aquatic Invertebrate Ecology 4 s.h.

The ecology and general biology of the freshwater biota with emphasis
on benthic invertebrates and life histories of aquatic species. Includes
some weekend field trips. Offered spring semester, odd years.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200.
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BIOL 385 Limnology 3 s.h.

The physical, chemical, and biological attributes of freshwater environments;
laboratory practice and field instruction in limnological
methodology. One Saturday field trip required. (LA)
Prerequisite: BIOL 282 or GEOL 282.
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BIOL 386 Seminar in Conservation Biology 4 s.h.

A discussion of current research and issues relating to the conservation
of biodiversity, covering such topics as patterns of diversity and rarity,
causes of extinction, population genetics, habitat fragmentation and
the practice of conservation biology. Students will be required to give
oral presentations and write a review paper about current topics.
Prerequisites: BIOL 282 or ENVS 101 and 201.
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BIOL 387 Field Parasitology 4 s.h.
The biology, ecology, and life cycles of animal parasites. The course
will focus on parasites of vertebrates and invertebrates encountered
during local field trips to aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Students
will be exposed to methods of collection, preservation, and identification
of animal parasites. Each student will independently prepare
a parasite specimen collection. Field Parasitology will meet 4 days
a week for 3 weeks during summers at the Biological Field Station
in Cooperstown.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200.

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BIOL 388 Stream Ecology 4 s.h.

Ecology and function of streams and rivers, including biological,
chemical, and physical features, with emphasis on current concepts
in stream ecology. Quantitative measurement of stream biota and
physical features during field and laboratory investigations. (LA)
Prerequisite: BIOL 282 or GEOL 282.
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BIOL 394 Special Topics 1-4 s.h.

This course gives students the opportunity to study in depth advanced
and special topics in the field of biology. Topics and instructors will
be announced prior to registration. (LA)
Prerequisite: JrS and BIOL 200.
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BIOL 395 Teaching Assistantship 3 s.h.

BIOL 395 Teaching Assistantship 1-3 s.h.
Provides college-level experience in teaching, laboratory design and
preparation in an upper level Biology course. Student works directly
under the instructor(s) of the course selected for the experience, and
may be assigned special readings or teaching projects related to the
particular subject. Depending on relevancy, a student may expect
to teach selected topics, tutor, set up and dismantle lab materials,
or work in the greenhouse, animal room, prep room, or outdoors
as agreed upon at the beginning of the semester by the student and
instructor. Credit for BIOL 395 may not be applied toward the
requirements for the Biology major or minor. Graded on pass/fail
basis only.
Prerequisites: CWE 1, two SUNY Oneonta biology courses and
meet minimum requirements stipulated on the campus teaching
assistantship application.
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BIOL 396 Directed Research III 1 s.h.
Directed research and training with faculty supervision to develop,
carry out and report on a module of research. Intended for students
with some prior exposure to research. Students may work independently
or as part of a team with other students at various academic
levels on campus, in the field, or at the Biological Field Station.
Experiences may include research methods, project proposals or
grant development, data collection, exposure to field or laboratory
instrumentation and the development of communication skills.
Directed research at the Biological Field Station is competitive and
typically conducted for 10 weeks in the summer, 36 hours per week.
Sponsored research may include a stipend or other monetary award.
No major credit for biology majors.
Prerequisites: BIOL 200, JrS.

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BIOL 397 Internship in Biology1-15 s.h.

Practical experience with an appropriate organization or agency.
Requirements and credits vary with the specific internship.
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BIOL 398 Undergraduate Seminar 1-4 s. h.

See description under BIOL 298. (LA)
Prerequisites: JrS,
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BIOL 399 Independent Study in Biology 1-6 s.h.

See description under BIOL 299.
Prerequisites: JrS and permission of department.
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INTD 214 Aggression in Man and Animals 3 s.h.

The study of the concepts of aggression as developed in the fields
of anthropology, biology, and psychology. A major emphasis of the
course is the integration of concepts from these areas, resulting in a
more complete, broader understanding of aggression. Topics discussed
include evolution of aggression, effects of natural selection, warfare,
modeling, ritualization, physiology, socialization of violence, effects
on social structure, case studies.
Prerequisite: an introductory BIOL, ANTH, or PSYC course.
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