BFS Locations

Main Laboratory
5838 State Hwy 80
Cooperstown, NY 13326
Phone: 607-547-8778
Fax: 607-547-5114

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THAYER FARM COMPLEX
Lakeside Farm &
Upland Interpretive Center

7027 State Hwy 80
Springfield, NY
(physical address)

Thayer Boathouse
7016 State Hwy 80
Springfield, NY

Rum Hill
Thurston Hill Rd.
Springfield, NY

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Goodyear Swamp Sanctuary
7290 State Hwy 80
Springfield, NY

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Greenwoods Conservancy
824 Zachow Rd.
Hartwick, NY 13348

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Upper Research Site
Averill Rd.
Cooperstown, NY

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News & Events

 
 

Recent Publications

May 1, 2017: Planning is underway for 50th Anniversary special events! Stay tuned for more information.

April 25, 2017: The 49th Annual Report of the Biological Field Station is now complete - print copies are available at the BFS Main Laboratory. The full report will be available online soon.

March 24, 2017: Dr. Florian Reyda, Professor of Biology, was awarded the Susan Sutton Smith Faculty Prize for Academic Axcellence and delivered the 2017 Susan Smith Lecture titled, “Parasites, Evolution and Us,” on Tuesday, April 11 at Morris Conference Center. Created to recognize faculty achievement outside the classroom, the Susan Sutton Smith Faculty Prize for Academic Excellence is named in memory of the late SUNY Oneonta professor of English.  Dr. Reyda is the twenty-third recipient of this prize.  This event and the student awards presented are made possible by the generous gifts of SUNY Oneonta Alumni to the 2016-2017 Fund for Oneonta.  (See the original SUNY Oneonta announcement here)

February 10, 2017: BFS faculty have been awarded a National Science Foundation grant in the amount of $193,459 for the project entitled "RUI: Acquisition of Tools for an Ecosystem-Based Approach to Fisheries and Aquatic Resource Research, Education, and Managment". Congratulations to Pincipal Investigator (PI) Dan Stich and co-PIs Kiyoko Yokota, Florian Reyda, and Willard Harman. The grant will fund the purchase of a variety of field research equipment, including an electrofishing boat and sampling gear for fisheries research and algal community evaluation, and an autonomous lake monitoring buoy with a weather station. See the full annoucement from SUNY Oneonta here.

Faculty Highlights:

Dr. Dan Stich, CLM. Dan joined the SUNY Oneonta Biology Department and Biological Field Station during Fall 2015. Before joining the faculty at SUNY Oneonta, Dan earned a B.T at SUNY Cobleskill in Fisheries and Aquaculture, M.S. at Virginia Tech in Fisheries and Wildlife, and a Ph.D. at The University of Maine in Wildlife Ecology. His interests range in breadth from basic physiology of individual organisms to how individual traits can result in population-level trends and patterns across landscapes, and how trends in these various levels of biological organization influence natural resource management and decision making. Dan’s research uses information from field and laboratory studies, along with modern quantitative techniques and computer-based modeling, to understand complex problems faced by natural resource managers.

Dr. Kiyoko Yokota, CLM. Dr. Yokota started her appointment with the SUNY Oneonta Biology Department and the Biological Filed Station in Fall 2013.  She earned her BS in Biology with ecology emphasis and a minor in Environmental Studies at Saint Cloud State University in Minnesota and Ph.D. in Ecology, Evolution and Behavior at University of Minnesota.  She worked as an environmental consultant within a civil engineering firm in Tokyo, Japan, and her assignments included environmental impact assessment for proposed dam sites, water quality management projects for existing dams, and habitat restoration projects for lakes and wetlands.  She was trained as a limnologist with a specialization in phytoplankton population dynamics and received the Croasdale Fellowship from the Phycological Society of America in 2003.  Kiyoko, with collaboration with the BFS staff and interns, plans to soon complete the first round of phytoplankton community characterization for Otsego Lake as well as to start experiments with laboratory cultures of locally important algae, such as those forming harmful algal blooms (HABs).  In addition to serving as a member of the Lake Management graduate faculty, she also mentors several undergraduate students with their research projects, including investigation of mercury bioaccumulation in fish (with assistance from NYSDEC, Syracuse University, and BFS’s own Dr. Reyda), survey of plankton community in an Alaskan glacial lake, and study of benthic diatoms in a stream.  She is certified as a Certified Lake Manager (CLM) by the North American Lake Management Society (NALMS) and currently serves as the Technical Advisor for the Otsego Lake Association.